|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author (up) David, A.; Smet, K.A.G.; Whitehead, L.
Title Methods for Assessing Quantity and Quality of Illumination Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Annual Review of Vision Science Abbreviated Journal Annu Rev Vis Sci
Volume 5 Issue Pages 479-502
Keywords Vision; Review; Photometry; Colorimetry
Abstract Human vision provides useful information about the shape and color of the objects around us. It works well in many, but not all, lighting conditions. Since the advent of human-made light sources, it has been important to understand how illumination affects vision quality, but this has been surprisingly difficult. The widespread introduction of solid-state light emitters has increased the urgency of this problem. Experts still debate how lighting can best enable high-quality vision-a key issue since about one-fifth of global electrical power production is used to make light. Photometry, the measurement of the visual quantity of light, is well established, yet significant uncertainties remain. Colorimetry, the measurement of color, has achieved good reproducibility, but researchers still struggle to understand how illumination can best enable high-quality color vision. Fortunately, in recent years, considerable progress has been made. Here, we summarize the current understanding and discuss key areas for future study.
Address Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1, Canada; email: lorne.whitehead@ubc.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2374-4642 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31226013 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2576
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Davidovic, M.; Djokic, L.; Cabarkapa, A.; Kostic, M.
Title Warm white versus neutral white LED street lighting: Pedestrians' impressions Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume in press Issue Pages 147715351880429
Keywords Psychology; Security
Abstract The subjective impressions of pedestrians are necessary in order to decide on the appropriate colour of light to be used for street lighting. Therefore, a pilot project aimed to compare subjective evaluations of the sidewalk illumination under two street lighting installations, realised by LEDs of 3000 K (warm white) and 4000 K (neutral white), was recently conducted in Belgrade. Both installations had comparable sidewalk illuminances as well as other relevant photometric parameters. The evaluation was done through a questionnaire. A group of 139 (61 male and 78 female) respondents, all of them university students, was asked to grade both lighting installations for the sidewalk light intensity, the appearance of human faces, the colour of light and the colour rendering as well as the overall impression. According to the median values, the 3000 K LED installation was considered better than the 4000 K installation for all aspects assessed as well as the overall impression. Although the survey results convincingly showed a preference for 3000 K LEDs for this comparison, additional research is needed using a more representative sample of people and a wider range of locations before a definite conclusion can be reached.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2045
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Davies, T.W.; Bennie, J.; Cruse, D.; Blumgart, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Multiple night-time light-emitting diode lighting strategies impact grassland invertebrate assemblages Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 23 Issue 7 Pages 2641-2648
Keywords Ecology; grasslands; LED
Abstract White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are rapidly replacing conventional outdoor lighting technologies around the world. Despite rising concerns over their impact on the environment and human health, the flexibility of LEDs has been advocated as a means of mitigating the ecological impacts of globally widespread outdoor night-time lighting through spectral manipulation, dimming and switching lights off during periods of low demand. We conducted a three-year field experiment in which each of these lighting strategies was simulated in a previously artificial light naive grassland ecosystem. White LEDs both increased the total abundance and changed the assemblage composition of adult spiders and beetles. Dimming LEDs by 50% or manipulating their spectra to reduce ecologically damaging wavelengths partially reduced the number of commoner species affected from seven to four. A combination of dimming by 50% and switching lights off between midnight and 04:00 am showed the most promise for reducing the ecological costs of LEDs, but the abundances of two otherwise common species were still affected. The environmental consequences of using alternative lighting technologies are increasingly well established. These results suggest that while management strategies using LEDs can be an effective means of reducing the number of taxa affected, averting the ecological impacts of night-time lighting may ultimately require avoiding its use altogether.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28139040 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1634
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Davies, T.W.; Duffy, J.P.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title The nature, extent, and ecological implications of marine light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages 347-355
Keywords Ecology; light pollution; oceans; marine; ecology; ecosystem; Review
Abstract Despite centuries of use, artificial light at night has only recently been recognized as a cause for environmental concern. Its global extent and ongoing encroachment into naturally lit ecosystems has sparked scientific interest into the many ways in which it may negatively affect human health, societal attitudes, scientific endeavors, and biological processes. Yet, perhaps because sources of artificial light are largely land based, the potential for artificial light pollution to interfere with the biology of the ocean has not been explored in any detail. There is little information on how light pollution affects those species, behaviors, and interactions that are informed by the intensity, spectra, and periodicity of natural nighttime light in marine ecosystems. Here, we provide an overview of the extent of marine light pollution, discuss how it changes the physical environment, and explore its potential role in shaping marine ecosystems.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Cornwall, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 365
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Davies, T.W.; McKee, D.; Fishwick, J.; Tidau, S.; Smyth, T.
Title Biologically important artificial light at night on the seafloor Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 12545
Keywords Ecology; Skyglow; Remote Sensing
Abstract Accelerating coastal development is increasing the exposure of marine ecosystems to nighttime light pollution, but is anthropogenic light reaching the seafloor in sufficient quantities to have ecological impacts? Using a combination of mapping, and radiative transfer modelling utilising in situ measurements of optical seawater properties, we quantified artificial light exposure at the sea surface, beneath the sea surface, and at the sea floor of an urbanised temperate estuary bordered by an LED lit city. Up to 76% of the three-dimensional seafloor area was exposed to biologically important light pollution. Exposure to green wavelengths was highest, while exposure to red wavelengths was nominal. We conclude that light pollution from coastal cities is likely having deleterious impacts on seafloor ecosystems which provide vital ecosystem services. A comprehensive understanding of these impacts is urgently needed.
Address Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, Devon, Plymouth, PL1 3DH, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32719492; PMCID:PMC7385152 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3071
Permanent link to this record