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Author (up) Becker, A.; Whitfield, A.K.; Cowley, P.D.; Järnegren, J.; Naesje, T.F.; Crispo, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Potential effects of artificial light associated with anthropogenic infrastructure on the abundance and foraging behaviour of estuary-associated fishes Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol  
  Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 43-50  
  Keywords fish; biology; ecology  
  Abstract As a consequence of a positive phototaxic response, the findings of this study suggest that artificial light often associated with man-made structures has the potential to alter fish communities within urban estuarine ecosystems by creating optimal conditions for predators. Future coastal developments should consider the ecological implications of lighting on aquatic communities. We recommend that lighting be minimized around coastal infrastructure and the use of red lights, which have limited penetration though water, be considered.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 64  
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Author (up) Becker, D.J.; Singh, D.; Pan, Q.; Montoure, J.D.; Talbott, K.M.; Wanamaker, S.M.; Ketterson, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night amplifies seasonal relapse of haemosporidian parasites in a widespread songbird Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 287 Issue 1935 Pages 20201831  
  Keywords *Animal Migration; Animals; Breeding; Parasitemia; Parasites; Recurrence; Seasons; Songbirds/*parasitology; *Junco hyemalis; *avian malaria; *ecoimmunology; *generalized additive models; *photoperiod; *urbanization  
  Abstract Urban habitats can shape interactions between hosts and parasites by altering not only exposure rates but also within-host processes. Artificial light at night (ALAN) is common in urban environments, and chronic exposure can impair host immunity in ways that may increase infection. However, studies of causal links between this stressor, immunity, and infection dynamics are rare, particularly in migratory animals. Here, we experimentally tested how ALAN affects cellular immunity and haemosporidian parasite intensity across the annual cycle of migrant and resident subspecies of the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis). We monitored an experimental group exposed to light at night and a control group under natural light/dark cycles as they passed through short days simulating early spring to longer days simulating the breeding season, followed by autumn migration. Using generalized additive mixed models, we show that ALAN increased inflammation, and leucocyte counts were greatest in early spring and autumn. At the start of the experiment, few birds had active infections based on microscopy, but PCR revealed many birds had chronic infections. ALAN increased parasitaemia across the annual cycle, with strong peaks in spring and autumn that were largely absent in control birds. As birds were kept in indoor aviaries to prevent vector exposure, this increased parasitaemia indicates relapse of chronic infection during costly life-history stages (i.e. reproduction). Although the immunological and parasitological time series were in phase for control birds, cross-correlation analyses also revealed ALAN desynchronized leucocyte profiles and parasitaemia, which could suggest a general exaggerated inflammatory response. Our study shows how a common anthropogenic influence can shape within-host processes to affect infection dynamics.  
  Address Environmental Resilience Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA; danbeck ( at ) iu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32962545; PMCID:PMC7542808 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3368  
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Author (up) Bedrosian, T.A.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Timing of light exposure affects mood and brain circuits Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Translational Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Transl Psychiatry  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e1017  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Temporal organization of physiology is critical for human health. In the past, humans experienced predictable periods of daily light and dark driven by the solar day, which allowed for entrainment of intrinsic circadian rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycles. Since the adoption of electric light, however, pervasive exposure to nighttime lighting has blurred the boundaries of day and night, making it more difficult to synchronize biological processes. Many systems are under circadian control, including sleep-wake behavior, hormone secretion, cellular function and gene expression. Circadian disruption by nighttime light perturbs those processes and is associated with increasing incidence of certain cancers, metabolic dysfunction and mood disorders. This review focuses on the role of artificial light at night in mood regulation, including mechanisms through which aberrant light exposure affects the brain. Converging evidence suggests that circadian disruption alters the function of brain regions involved in emotion and mood regulation. This occurs through direct neural input from the clock or indirect effects, including altered neuroplasticity, neurotransmission and clock gene expression. Recently, the aberrant light exposure has been recognized for its health effects. This review summarizes the evidence linking aberrant light exposure to mood.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Group, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2158-3188 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28140399; PMCID:PMC5299389 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2446  
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Author (up) Beebe, W. openurl 
  Title Rediscovery of the Bermuda cahow Type Journal Article
  Year 1935 Publication Bulletin of the New York Zoological Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 38 Issue Pages 187-190  
  Keywords Animals  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2556  
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Author (up) Behera, S.K.; Mohanta, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Total An Investigation into Light Pollution as a Limiting factor for shift of Mass nesting ground at Rushikulya rookery Ganjam Odishas Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Marine Research and Reviews Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Illumination due to artificial lights on nesting beaches and from nearby place to nesting beaches is detrimental to sea turtles because it alters critical nocturnal behaviors specifically, their choice of nesting sites and their return path to the sea after nesting. Illuminations perplex the hatchlings to find sea after emerging. Numerous studies conducted in other countries have demonstrated that artificial lights negatively impact on turtles, both female adults as they come to and go from their home beach to lay eggs, and to turtle hatchlings as they seek out the way to the open ocean. In this study we correlated the mass nesting intensity of 5years (2012 to 2018) at Rushikulya mass nesting site to the illumination zone. Illumination due to light conditions on nesting beaches are complex, and measuring light pollution in a way that effectively captures the impacts to sea turtles is difficult. But increase in intensity of illumination on selective mass nesting beaches showed gradual reduction in intensity of preferred nesting site during the mass nesting event. A gradual shift of nesting preference was also observed more toward darker zone.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2104  
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