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Author (up) BjÖRnberg, T.K.S.; Wilbur, K.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Copepod Phototaxis And Vertical Migration Influenced By Xanthene Dyes Type Journal Article
  Year 1968 Publication The Biological Bulletin Abbreviated Journal The Biological Bulletin  
  Volume 134 Issue 3 Pages 398-410  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract 1. Phototaxis of the copepods Paracalanus crassirostris, Calanopia americana, and Acartia lillijeborgi has been measured by determining the percentage of a population moving toward or away from a point source of light per unit time. Quantitative differences in positive phototaxis were found between the species. Photopositive responses differed during the day and night in Acartia but not in Paracalanus and Calanopia.

2. Rhodamine B (8.4 x 10-6 M) brought about the following effects: (a) Locomotor activity was reversibly inhibited in all species. (b) Photopositive responses were increased in Calanopia and Acartia but decreased in Paracalanus. (c) The difference between day and night responses to a point source of light was abolished in Acartia and induced in Calanopia. (d) Somersaulting was induced in Paracalanus but not in the other species.

3. Pyronine B (8.4 x 10-6 M) also decreased locomotor activity. Fluorescein sodium (1.1 x 10-5 M and 1.1 x 10-4 M) was without significant effect.

4. Paracalanus, Calanopia, and Acartia exhibited characteristically distinct diurnal migratory cycles in vertical cylinders, which correlated well with behavior in natural waters. Calanopia and Acartia migrated to the bottom in the daylight whereas Paracalanus and young forms of Acartia were widely distributed vertically during daylight. Specimens of Calanopia and Acartia kept in the dark did not migrate.

5. The effects of rhodamine B (8.4 x 10-6 M) on vertical migration depended upon species, developmental stage, and time of day. In general, rhodamine increased the concentration of animals at the surface at night and at the bottom in daylight. Fluorescein sodium (1.1 x 10-5 M and 1.1 x 10-4 M) had little effect on vertical migration.

6. The effectiveness of rhodamine B and pyronine B is probably related to the presence of diethylamine groups lacking in fluorescein.
 
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3185 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2469  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Blagonravov, M.L.; Bryk, A.A.; Medvedeva, E.V.; Goryachev, V.A.; Chibisov, S.M.; Kurlaeva, A.O.; Agafonov, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Structure of Rhythms of Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Excretion of Electrolytes, and Secretion of Melatonin in Normotensive and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Maintained under Conditions of Prolonged Daylight Duration Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bull Exp Biol Med  
  Volume 168 Issue 1 Pages 18-23  
  Keywords Animals; arterial hypertension; biological rhythms; excessive exposure to light; melatonin  
  Abstract We studied the structure of rhythms of BP, HR (by telemetric monitoring), electrolyte excretion (by capillary electrophoresis), and products of epiphyseal melatonin (by the urinary concentration of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin measured by ELISA) in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive SHR rats maintained at 16/8 h and 20/4 h light-dark regimes. In Wister-Kyoto rats exposed to prolonged daylight, we observed changes in the amplitude, rhythm power (% of rhythm), and range of oscillations of systolic BP; HR mezor decreased. In SHR rats, mezor of HR also decreased, but other parameters of rhythms remained unchanged. Changes in electrolyte excretion were opposite in normo- and hypertensive rats. Under conditions of 20/4 h light-dark regime, daytime melatonin production tended to increase in normotensive rats and significantly increased in SHR rats. At the same time, nighttime melatonin production did not change in both normotensive and hypertensive animals. As the secretion of melatonin has similar features in animals of both lines, we can say that the epiphyseal component of the “biological clock” is not the only component of the functional system that determines the response of the studied rhythms to an increase in the duration of light exposure.  
  Address V. A. Frolov Department of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Institute for Medicine, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow, Russia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-4888 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31741240 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2755  
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Author (up) Blood, W.H. openurl 
  Title What is street lighting? Type Journal Article
  Year 1907 Publication Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages 633-644  
  Keywords Lighting; History  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2742  
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Author (up) Blundell, E.; Schaffer, V.; Moyle, B.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dark sky tourism and the sustainability of regional tourism destinations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Tourism Recreation Research Abbreviated Journal Tourism Recreation Research  
  Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 549-556  
  Keywords Skyglow; Dark sky tourism  
  Abstract Destinations across the globe face severe and potentially irreversible consequences from tourism growth and development. Contemporary approaches such as reducing access or site closures have been identified to increase demand, potentially exacerbating negative impacts. Despite acknowledgement of the impacts of tourism, limited studies have considered the ‘night sky’ as a tourism destination, nor the implications for regional sustainability. Consequently, the aim of this research is to explore the intersection between Dark sky tourism (DST) and sustainability within regional tourism. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the Murweh Shire, in outback Australia. The analysis revealed sustainability, ethics and education as critical to achieving sustainable DST in a regional setting. A core contribution of this research is a conceptual model for sustainable DST. Future research is required to further explore ethics as a critical, yet often neglected, component of sustainable tourism.  
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  ISSN 0250-8281 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3216  
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Author (up) Bolliger, J. Hennet, T., Wermelinger, B., Blum, S., Haller, J. & Obrist, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Low impact of two LED colors on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity in a peri‑urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Insect Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artifcial light at night (ALAN) is an important driver of change in ecological environments of the 21th century. We investigated the impact on nocturnal insect abundance and bat activity of two LED light colors (warm-white 2700 K, cold-white

6500 K) in a peri-urban environment. Bat activity (predominantly Pipistrellus pipistrellus) was largely driven by prey availability (insects), while insect abundance was responsive to nightly weather conditions (precipitation, temperature). Thus, both insects and bats were not diferentially responsive to cold-white or warm-white LEDs. These fndings are largely in contrast with literature, particularly for insects. However, as most published experiments on ALAN were conducted in areas that were lit solely for the purpose of the experiment, we would like to bring forward that (1) adaptation to environmental constraints may play a role in peri-urban environments that have been exposed to ALAN for many decades; or (2) impacts of cold-white LEDs on nocturnal insects may be lower than expected, because nocturnal insects adapted to low-light conditions may be put of by cold white light sources (6500 K).
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2957  
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