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Author (up) Bullock, B.; McGlashan, E.M.; Burns, A.C.; Lu, B.S.; Cain, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Traits related to bipolar disorder are associated with an increased post-illumination pupil response Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Psychiatry Research Abbreviated Journal Psychiatry Res  
  Volume 278 Issue Pages 35-41  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Mood states in bipolar disorder appear to be closely linked to changes in sleep and circadian function. It has been suggested that hypersensitivity of the circadian system to light may be a trait vulnerability for bipolar disorder. Healthy persons with emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder also appear to exhibit problems with circadian rhythms, which may be associated with individual differences in light sensitivity. This study investigated the melanopsin-driven post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) in relation to emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder (measured with the General Behavior Inventory) in a non-clinical group (n=61). An increased PIPR was associated with increased bipolar disorder-related traits. Specifically, the hypomania scale of the General Behavior Inventory was associated with an increased post-blue PIPR. Further, both the full hypomania and shortened '7 Up' scales were significantly predicted by PIPR, after age, sex and depressive traits were controlled. These findings suggest that increased sensitivity to light may be a risk factor for mood problems in the general population, and support the idea that hypersensitivity to light is a trait vulnerability for, rather than symptom of, bipolar disorder.  
  Address School of Psychological Sciences and Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: sean.cain@monash.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-1781 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31136914 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2510  
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Discussion of “Closed-Course Human Factors Evaluation of Marking and Marker Visibility” by Barrette and Pike Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record  
  Volume 2673 Issue 10 Pages 850-851  
  Keywords Commentary; Vision  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2774  
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.; Bierman, A.; Rea, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating the Blue-Light Hazard from Solid State Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics : JOSE Abbreviated Journal Int J Occup Saf Ergon  
  Volume 25 Issue 2 Pages 311-320  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose New light sources including light emitting diodes (LEDs) have elicited questions about retinal damage, including the blue-light hazard. Some organizations have recommended avoiding using LEDs with correlated color temperatures (CCTs) exceeding 3000 K, since they tend to produce greater short-wavelength energy. This paper provides quantitative comparisons among light sources and use cases as they affect blue-light hazard. Methods The spectral radiant power characteristics of incandescent, fluorescent, LED and daylight sources were evaluated in terms of blue-light hazard using standard procedures for phakic, aphakic and pseudophakic eyes. Results Under most use cases, LEDs do not exhibit greater risk for blue-light hazard than other sources (e.g., incandescent). Because they generally produce little-to-no ultraviolet energy, LEDs often present less risk to aphakic eyes. Conclusions LEDs present no special concerns for blue-light hazard over some other common sources in typical use cases because photophobic responses limit exposure to bright sources. Where photophobic responses might not occur (e.g., eye surgery patients or premature infants) or where individuals suppress these responses (e.g., stage actors), caution is necessary. Evidence remains inconsistent regarding the risk of human retinal damage from long-term exposures to light insufficient to reach acute blue-light hazard thresholds.  
  Address a Lighting Research Center , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute , US  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1080-3548 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28876164 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1720  
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Author (up) Bumgarner, J.R.; Walker, W.H. 2nd; Liu, J.A.; Walton, J.C.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night exposure induces cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in male mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Allodynia; Hyperalgesia; Light at Night; Neuroinflammation; Opioid; Pain  
  Abstract The growing presence of artificial lighting across the globe presents a number of challenges to human and ecological health despite its societal benefits. Exposure to artificial light at night, a seemingly innocuous aspect of modern life, disrupts behavior and physiological functions. Specifically, light at night induces neuroinflammation, which is implicated in neuropathic and nociceptive pain states, including hyperalgesia and allodynia. Because of its influence on neuroinflammation, we investigated the effects of dim light at night exposure on pain responsiveness in male mice. In this study, mice exposed to four days of dim (5 lux) light at night exhibited cold hyperalgesia. Further, after 28 days of exposure, mice exhibited both cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. No heat/hot hyperalgesia was observed in this experiment. Altered nociception in mice exposed to dim light at night was concurrent with upregulated interleukin-6 and nerve growth factor mRNA expression in the medulla and elevated mu-opioid receptor mRNA expression in the periaqueductal gray region of the brain. The current results support the relationship between disrupted circadian rhythms and altered pain sensitivity. In summary, we observed that dim light at night induces cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, potentially through elevated central neuroinflammation and dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506 United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32201267 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2864  
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Author (up) Bunning, E.; Moser, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Interference of moonlight with the photoperiodic measurement of time by plants, and their adaptive reaction Type Journal Article
  Year 1969 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 62 Issue 4 Pages 1018-1022  
  Keywords Plants; Moonlight  
  Abstract Threshold values of photoperiodic time-measurements correspond approximately to moonlight intensities. Experiments with Glycine and Euglena reveal that this is also the threshold value for synchronization of the circadian cycle. Saturation of this reaction is reached with 10 lx in 12:12 hr light-dark cycles. Thus, moonlight might disturb time measurement.In Glycine, Arachis, and Trifolium the intensity of the light coming from the moon to the upper surface of the leaf is reduced by circadian leaf movement to values between 5 and 20 per cent (or even less than 5 per cent) of full-moon light intensity. Such a reduction eliminates the disturbing effects of moonlight. This finding indicates that leaf movements have an adaptive value of the kind that Darwin sought to identify. It also indicates that the behavior of the upper leaf epidermis as a “sense organ for light”(13) has an adaptive value.In the short-day plants Perilla ocymoides and Chenopodium amaranticolor, a specific photoperiodic phenomenon was found that counteracts the disturbing effect of moonlight. Here light intensities similar to those of moonlight, introduced during the night, promote flowering instead of inhibiting it.  
  Address Institute Of Biology, University Of Tubingen, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16591742; PMCID:PMC223607 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3035  
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