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Author (up) Cabrera-Barona, P.F.; Bayón, M.; Durán, G.; Bonilla, A.; Mejía, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Generating and Mapping Amazonian Urban Regions Using a Geospatial Approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi  
  Volume 9 Issue 7 Pages 453  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (1) background: Urban representations of the Amazon are urgently needed in order tobetter understand the complexity of urban processes in this area of the World. So far, limited workthat represents Amazonian urban regions has been carried out. (2) methods: Our study area is theEcuadorian Amazon. We performed a K-means algorithm using six urban indicators: Urban fractaldimension, number of paved streets, urban radiant intensity (luminosity), and distances to theclosest new deforested areas, to oil pollution sources, and to mining pollution sources. We alsocarried out fieldwork to qualitatively validate our geospatial and statistical analyses. (3) results:We generated six Amazonian urban regions representing different urban configurations and processesof major cities, small cities, and emerging urban zones. The Amazonian urban regions generatedrepresent the urban systems of the Ecuadorian Amazon at a general scale, and correspond to theurban realities at a local scale. (4) conclusions: An Amazonian urban region is understood as a set ofurban zones that are dispersed and share common urban characteristics such a similar distance tooil pollution sources or similar urban radiant intensity. Our regionalization model represents thecomplexity of the Amazonian urban systems, and the applied methodology could be transferred toother Amazonian countries.  
  Address  
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  ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3115  
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Author (up) Cabrera-Cruz, S.A.; Cohen, E.B.; Smolinsky, J.A.; Buler, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night is Related to Broad-Scale Stopover Distributions of Nocturnally Migrating Landbirds along the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 12 Issue 3 Pages 395  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The distributions of birds during migratory stopovers are influenced by a hierarchy of factors. For example, in temperate regions, migrants are concentrated near areas of bright artificial light at night (ALAN) and also the coastlines of large water bodies at broad spatial scales. However, less is known about what drives broad-scale stopover distributions in the tropics. We quantified seasonal densities of nocturnally migrating landbirds during spring and fall of 2011–2015, using two weather radars on the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico (Sabancuy and Cancun). We tested the influence of environmental predictors in explaining broad-scale bird stopover densities. We predicted higher densities in areas (1) closer to the coast in the fall and farther away in spring and (2) closer to bright ALAN and with lower ALAN intensity in both seasons. We found that birds were more concentrated near the coastline in the fall and away from it in spring around Cancun but not Sabancuy. Counter to our expectations, we detected increased bird densities with increased distance from lights in spring around Sabancuy, and in both seasons around Cancun, suggesting avoidance of bright areas during those seasons. This is the first evidence of broad-scale bird avoidance of bright areas during stopover.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3004  
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Author (up) Cabrera-Cruz, S.A.; Smolinsky, J.A.; McCarthy, K.P.; Buler, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urban areas affect flight altitudes of nocturnally migrating birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol  
  Volume 88 Issue 12 Pages 1873-1887  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; Aeroecology; bird migration; flight altitude; light pollution; radar; urbanization  
  Abstract 1.Urban areas affect terrestrial ecological processes and local weather, but we know little about their effect on aerial ecological processes. 2.Here, we identify urban from non-urban areas based on the intensity of artificial light at night (ALAN) in the landscape, and, along with weather covariates, evaluate the effect of urbanization on flight altitudes of nocturnally migrating birds. 3.Birds are attracted to ALAN, hence we predicted that altitudes would be lower over urban than over non-urban areas. However, other factors associated with urbanization may also affect flight altitudes. For example, surface temperature and terrain roughness are higher in urban areas, increasing air turbulence, height of the boundary layer, and affecting local winds. 4.We used data from nine weather surveillance radars in the eastern US to estimate altitudes at five quantiles of the vertical distribution of birds migrating at night over urban and non-urban areas during five consecutive spring and autumn migration seasons. We fit generalized linear mixed models by season for each of the five quantiles of bird flight altitude and their differences between urban and non-urban areas. 5.After controlling for other environmental variables and contrary to our prediction, we found that birds generally fly higher over urban areas compared to rural areas in spring, and marginally higher at the mid layers of the vertical distribution in autumn. We also identified a small interaction effect between urbanization and crosswind speed, and between urbanization and surface air temperature, on flight altitudes. We also found that the difference in flight altitudes of nocturnally migrating birds between urban and non-urban areas varied among radars and seasons, but were consistently higher over urban areas throughout the years sampled. 6.Our results suggest that the effects of urbanization on wildlife extend into the aerosphere, and are complex, stressing the need of understanding the influence of anthropogenic factors on airspace habitat. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology, University of Delaware, Delaware, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31330569 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2604  
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Author (up) Cai, W.; Yue, J.; Dai, Q.; Hao, L.; Lin, Y.; Shi, W.; Huang, Y.; Wei, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of room surface reflectance on corneal illuminance and rule-of-thumb equations for circadian lighting design Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment  
  Volume 141 Issue Pages 288-297  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Recently, corneal illuminance attracts much attention because it is closely related to important functions of indoor lighting. Especially, applying circadian light in the built environment places a challenging requirement on indirect corneal illuminance. In this work, rule-of-thumb equations are proposed to guide circadian lighting design: (i) for artificial lighting, Ecor,avg (i) = (Φ/C1) · ρ/(1−ρ′), where Ecor,avg (i) is the average indirect corneal illuminance at standing or sitting positions, Φ is the initial flux from luminaires, C1 is a constant comparable to the total room surface area, ρ is the reflectance of the surface where the first reflection occurs, and ρ′ is the area-weighted average of surface reflectance; and (ii) for daylighting, Ecor,avg (i) = C2 · WWR · ρ/(1−ρ′), where C2 is a constant, and WWR represents the window-to-wall ratio.

The equations above are validated by comparing against numerical simulation data obtained with the Radiance software. For artificial lighting simulation, various combinations of room surface reflectance, initial light distribution, and WWR are investigated; and for daylighting simulation, different combinations of surface reflectance, WWR, and geographic location are analyzed. The good fits to simulation data indicate that the proposed simple equations can provide reasonably accurate results for quick feedback at the field. It is also demonstrated that room surface reflectance has a dominant impact on indirect corneal illuminance. The approach of improving surface reflectance is more favorable than increasing luminaire flux or expanding window area, and therefore should be the recommended approach to achieve quality and efficient circadian lighting.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1929  
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Author (up) Calvo-Sanz, J.A.; Tapia-Ayuga, C.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blue light emission spectra of popular mobile devices: The extent of user protection against melatonin suppression by built-in screen technology and light filtering software systems Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Measurements; Blue light; blue light emission; light control software; mobile devices; screen technology  
  Abstract Blue light, with wavelengths shorter than 440-450 nm, is the most energetic radiation of the visible spectrum for the human eye, and its possible multiple effects on the human nervous and other systems have become a line of research by many investigators. The use of mobile devices whose screens emit various amounts of blue light is common nowadays. This study evaluated the efficiency of the blue light screen and control software technologies of eight different mobile devices. Emitted screen spectra of the different mobile devices according to different conditions of blue light emission software control were obtained using a spectrograph, and the derived spectra were compared with the melatonin suppression action spectrum. The amount of blue light emission and predicted melatonin suppression varied according to the unique software control and screen technology of each device. AMOLED screen technology, compared with other screen technologies, achieved better control of blue light emission. The effect of blue light filters depends on the screen technology; however, the melatonin suppression index of mobile devices is not reduced sufficiently by the use of blue light-attenuating software.  
  Address Departamento De Fisica De La Atmosfera Y Astrofisica, Universidad Complutense De Madrid , Madrid, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32649241 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3048  
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