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Author (up) Daneshmandi, M.; Neiseh, F.; SadeghiShermeh, M.; Ebadi, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of eye mask on sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Caring Sciences Abbreviated Journal J Caring Sci  
  Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 135-143  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Sleep is one of the basic human needs and sleep deprivation causes nu-merous adverse effects on the human body and mind. Due to reduced sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome, this study was carried out to determine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome. METHODS: In this two-group controlled clinical trial, sixty patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units of Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran in 2010 were selected by purposeful sampling method and randomly allocated to two groups of case and control. In the case group, in the second night stay, the intervention of eye mask was done per night and by using the Petersburg's sleep quality index; sleep quality was evaluated during and at the end of hospitalization. Then data were analyzed by paired t-test, independent t-test, Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficient and SPSS software version 19. RESULTS: Total sleep quality score of the case group was significantly decreased after intervention (4.86 +/- 1.88) from before intervention (10.46 +/- 4.09) (p < 0.000). In addi-tion, total score of sleep quality after intervention in the case group (4.86 +/- 1.88) was significant different from the control group (8.43 +/- 1.97) (p < 0.005). CONCLUSION: Using eye mask, as an economical and uncomplicated method, can improve sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in the coronary care units and can be used as an alternative method of treatment instead of drug therapy.  
  Address PhD ,Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2251-9920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25276688; PMCID:PMC4161075 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2252  
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Author (up) Datta, S.; Samanta, D.; Tiwary, B.; Chaudhuri, A.G.; Chakrabarti, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sex and estrous cycle dependent changes in locomotor activity, anxiety and memory performance in aged mice after exposure of light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 365 Issue Pages 198-209  
  Keywords Animals; mouse models; locomotor activities  
  Abstract Light-at-night (LAN) can affect mammalian behaviour. But, the effects of LAN on aged rodents remain undefined yet. In the present investigation, aged Swiss Albino mice, habituated in regular light-dark cycle, were exposed to bright-light-pulse (1-hr) at night on the day of study followed by experimentations for assessment of locomotor activities in the open field, anxiety in the elevated plus maze and short-term memory for novel object recognition (NOR) in the habituated field. Under without-bright-light exposure, (a) aged proestrous females showed greater locomotor activities and less anxiety than in aged diestrous females, (b) aged males showed locomotor activities and anxiety level similar to aged diestrous females and aged proestrous females respectively and (c) all animals failed to retain in object discrimination memory. LAN exposure exhibited the continual failure of such retention of memory while animals showed free and spontaneous exploration with thigmotactic behaviour having no object bias and/or phobia, but time stay in objects by animals altered variably among sexes and stages of estrous cycle. Overall, the LAN caused (a) diminution in locomotor activities, rise in anxiety and failure of memory for recognition of both familiar and novel objects in aged proestrous females, (b) hyperlocomotor activities and reduction in anxiety in both males and diestrous females with the failure of memory for recognition of novel objects only in aged males while diestrous females showed enhanced exploration time to both objects during NOR. Thus, nocturnal behaviour of aged mice varies with sex and estrous cycle and light acts differentially on them.  
  Address University of Calcutta, Department of Physiology, 92, APC Road, Kolkata, 700009, West Bengal, India. Electronic address: ncphysiolcu@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30853396 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2259  
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Author (up) Daugaard, S.; Markvart, J.; Bonde, J.P.; Christoffersen, J.; Garde, A.H.; Hansen, A.M.; Schlunssen, V.; Vestergaard, J.M.; Vistisen, H.T.; Kolstad, H.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Exposure during Days with Night, Outdoor, and Indoor Work Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Annals of Work Exposures and Health Abbreviated Journal Ann Work Expo Health  
  Volume 63 Issue 6 Pages 651–665  
  Keywords Human Health; Shift work; melatonin suppression; mood disorders  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess light exposure during days with indoor, outdoor, and night work and days off work. METHODS: Light intensity was continuously recorded for 7 days across the year among indoor (n = 170), outdoor (n = 151), and night workers (n = 188) in Denmark (55-56 degrees N) equipped with a personal light recorder. White light intensity, duration above 80, 1000, and 2500 lux, and proportion of red, green, and blue light was depicted by time of the day and season for work days and days off work. RESULTS: Indoor workers' average light exposure only intermittently exceeded 1000 lux during daytime working hours in summer and never in winter. During daytime working hours, most outdoor workers exceeded 2500 lux in summer and 1000 lux in winter. Night workers spent on average 10-50 min >80 lux when working night shifts. During days off work, indoor and night workers were exposed to higher light intensities than during work days and few differences were seen between indoor, outdoor, and night workers. The spectral composition of light was similar for indoor, outdoor, and night workers during days at and off work. CONCLUSION: The night workers of this study were during night hours on average exposed for a limited time to light intensities expected to suppress melatonin. The indoor workers were exposed to light levels during daylight hours that may reduce general well-being and mood, especially in winter. Outdoor workers were during summer daylight hours exposed to light levels comparable to those used for the treatment of depression.  
  Address Department of Occupational Medicine, Danish Ramazinni Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, 8200 Aarhus, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2398-7308 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30865270 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2268  
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Author (up) Dautovich, N.D.; Schreiber, D.R.; Imel, J.L.; Tighe, C.A.; Shoji, K.D.; Cyrus, J.; Bryant, N.; Lisech, A.; O'Brien, C.; Dzierzewski, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A systematic review of the amount and timing of light in association with objective and subjective sleep outcomes in community-dwelling adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sleep Health Abbreviated Journal Sleep Health  
  Volume 5 Issue 1 Pages 31–48  
  Keywords Human Health; Review; light timing; Sleep  
  Abstract Light is considered the dominant environmental cue, or zeitgeber, influencing the sleep-wake cycle. Despite recognizing the importance of light for our well-being, less is known about the specific conditions under which light is optimally associated with better sleep. Therefore, a systematic review was conducted to examine the association between the amount and timing of light exposure in relation to sleep outcomes in healthy, community-dwelling adults. A systematic search was conducted of four databases from database inception to June 2016. In total, 45 studies met the review eligibility criteria with generally high study quality excepting for the specification of eligibility criteria and the justification of sample size. The majority of studies involved experimental manipulation of light (n = 32) vs observational designs (n = 13). Broad trends emerged suggesting that (1) bright light (>1000 lux) has positive implications for objectively assessed sleep outcomes compared to dim (<100 lux) and moderate light (100-1000 lux) and (2) bright light (>1000 lux) has positive implications for subjectively assessed sleep outcomes compared to moderate light (100-1000 lux). Effects due to the amount of light are moderated by the timing of light exposure such that, for objectively assessed sleep outcomes, brighter morning and evening light exposure are consistent with a shift in the timing of the sleep period to earlier and later in the day, respectively. For subjectively assessed sleep outcomes, brighter light delivered in the morning was associated with self-reported sleep improvements and brighter evening light exposure was associated with worse self-reported sleep.  
  Address Psychology Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, 800 W Franklin St, Room 203, PO Box 842018, Richmond, VA 23284-2018 USA; ndautovich(at)vcu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher National Sleep Foundation Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2352-7218 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2050  
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Author (up) David, A.; Smet, K.A.G.; Whitehead, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Methods for Assessing Quantity and Quality of Illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Annual Review of Vision Science Abbreviated Journal Annu Rev Vis Sci  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 479-502  
  Keywords Vision; Review; Photometry; Colorimetry  
  Abstract Human vision provides useful information about the shape and color of the objects around us. It works well in many, but not all, lighting conditions. Since the advent of human-made light sources, it has been important to understand how illumination affects vision quality, but this has been surprisingly difficult. The widespread introduction of solid-state light emitters has increased the urgency of this problem. Experts still debate how lighting can best enable high-quality vision-a key issue since about one-fifth of global electrical power production is used to make light. Photometry, the measurement of the visual quantity of light, is well established, yet significant uncertainties remain. Colorimetry, the measurement of color, has achieved good reproducibility, but researchers still struggle to understand how illumination can best enable high-quality color vision. Fortunately, in recent years, considerable progress has been made. Here, we summarize the current understanding and discuss key areas for future study.  
  Address Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1, Canada; email: lorne.whitehead@ubc.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2374-4642 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31226013 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2576  
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