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Author (up) Aubé, M.; Franchomme-Fossé, L.; Robert-Staehler, P.; Houle, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution modeling and detection in a heterogeneous environment: toward a night time aerosol optical depth retrieval method. Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Proceedings of SPIE 2005 -- Volume 5890, San Diego, California, USA. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5890 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow; aerosol optical depth;  remote sensing; light pollution; artificial skyglow  
  Abstract Tracking the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is of particular importance in monitoring aerosol contributions to global radiative forcing. Until now, the two standard techniques used for retrieving AOD were; (i) sun photometry, and (ii) satellite based approaches, such as based DDV (Dense Dark Vegetation) inversion algorithms. These methods are only available for use during daylight time since they are based on direct or indirect observation of sunlight. Few attempts have been made to measure AOD behaviour at night. One such method uses spectrally ­ calibrated stars as reference targets but the number of available stars is limited. This is especially true for urban sites where artificial lighting hides most  of these stars. In this research, we  attempt  to provide an alternate method, one  which exploits artificial sky glow or light pollution. This methodology links a 3D light pollution model with in situ light pollution measurements. The basic idea is to adjust an AOD value into the model in order to fit measured light pollution. This method requires an accurate model that includes spatial heterogeneity in lighting angular geometry, in lighting spectral dependence, in ground spectral reflectance and in topography. This model, named ILLUMINA, computes 1st and 2nd order molecular and aerosol scattering, as well as aerosol absorption. These model features represent major improvements to previous light pollution models. Therefore, new possibilities for light pollution studies will arise, many of which are of particular interest to the astronomical community. In this paper we will present a first sensitive study applied to the ILLUMINA model.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 554  
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Author (up) Aubé, M.; Kocifaj, M.; Zamorano, J.; Solano Lamphar, H.A.; Sanchez de Miguel, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The spectral amplification effect of clouds to the night sky radiance in Madrid Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 181 Issue Pages 11-23  
  Keywords Skyglow; Madrid; Spain; Europe; artificial light at night; light pollution; clouds; amplification  
  Abstract Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) may have various environmental impacts ranging from compromising the visibility of astronomical objects to the perturbation of circadian cycles in animals and humans. In the past much research has been carried out to study the impact of ALAN on the radiance of the night sky during clear sky conditions. This was mainly justified by the need for a better understanding of the behavior of ALAN propagation into the environment in order to protect world-class astronomical facilities. More recently, alongside to the threat to the natural starry sky, many issues have emerged from the biological science community. It has been shown that, nearby or inside cities, the presence of cloud cover generally acts as an amplifier for artificial sky radiance while clouds behave as attenuators for remote observers. In this paper we show the spectral behavior of the zenith sky radiance amplification factor exerted by clouds inside a city. We compare in-situ measurements made with the spectrometer SAND-4 with a numerical model applied to the specific geographical context of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in Spain.  
  Address Cégep de Sherbrooke, 475 rue du Cégep, Sherbrooke, Canada J1E 4K1; aubema(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1351  
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Author (up) Aubé, M.; Marseille, C.; Farkouh, A.; Dufour, A.; Simoneau, A.; Zamorano, J.; Roby, J.; Tapia, C. url  doi
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  Title Mapping the Melatonin Suppression, Star Light and Induced Photosynthesis Indices with the LANcube Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 12 Issue 23 Pages 3954  
  Keywords Instrumentation; artificial light at night; intrusive light; direct light pollution; radiometry; multispectral; multiangular; Melatonin Suppression Index; Star Light Index; spectroscopy; measurement; synthetic photometry  
  Abstract Increased exposure to artificial light at night can affect human health including disruption of melatonin production and circadian rhythms which can extend to increased risks of hormonal cancers and other serious diseases. In addition, multiple negative impacts on fauna and flora are well documented, and it is a matter of fact that artificial light at night is a nuisance for ground-based astronomy. These impacts are frequently linked to the colour of the light or more specifically to its spectral content. Artificial light at night is often mapped by using spaceborne sensors, but most of them are panchromatic and thus insensitive to the colour. In this paper, we suggest a method that allows high-resolution mapping of the artificial light at night by using ground-based measurements with the LANcube system. The newly developed device separates the light detected in four bands (Red, Green, Blue and Clear) and provides this information for six faces of a cube. We found relationships between the LANcube’s colour ratios and (1) the Melatonin Suppression Index, (2) the StarLight Index and (3) the Induced Photosynthesis Index. We show how such relationships combined with data acquisition from a LANcube positioned on the top of a car can be used to produce spectral indices maps of a whole city in a few hours.  
  Address Cégep de Sherbrooke, Département de Géomatique Appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1E 4K1, Canada; martin.aube ( at ) cegepsherbrooke.qc.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3304  
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Author (up) Aubé, M.; Simoneau, A.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Díaz-Castro, J.; Serra-Ricart, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Restoring the night sky darkness at Observatorio del Teide: First application of the model Illumina version 2 Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 497 Issue 3 Pages 2501-2516  
  Keywords Skyglow; Teide Observatory; Tenerife; Spain; modeling; Illumina; numerical methods  
  Abstract The propagation of artificial light into real environments is complex. To perform its numerical modelling with accuracy, one must consider hyperspectral properties of the lighting devices and their geographic positions, the hyperspectral properties of the ground reflectance, the size and distribution of small-scale obstacles, the blocking effect of topography, the lamps angular photometry and the atmospheric transfer function (aerosols and molecules). A detailed radiative transfer model can be used to evaluate how a particular change in the lighting infrastructure may affect the sky radiance. In this paper, we use the new version (v2) of the Illumina model to evaluate a night sky restoration plan for the Teide Observatory located on the island of Tenerife, Spain. In the past decades, the sky darkness was severely degraded by growing light pollution on the Tenerife Island. In this work, we use the contribution maps giving the effect of each pixel of the territory to the artificial sky radiance. We exploit the hyperspectral capabilities of Illumina v2 and show how the contribution maps can be integrated over regions or municipalities according to the Johnson–Cousins photometric bands spectral sensitivities. The sky brightness reductions per municipality after a complete shutdown and a conversion to light-emitting diodes are calculated in the Johnson–Cousins B, V, R bands. We found that the conversion of the lighting infrastructure of Tenerife with LED (1800 and 2700 K), according to the conversion strategy in force, would result in a zenith V-band sky brightness reduction of ≈0.3 mag arcsec−2.  
  Address Département de physique, Cégep de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, 475 rue du Cégep, Sherbrooke, Québec J1E 4K1, Canada; martin.aube ( at ) cegepsherbrooke.qc.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3406  
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Author (up) Aubé, M.; Simoneau, A.; Wainscoat, R.; Nelson, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modeling the effects of phosphor converted LED lighting to the night sky of the Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 478 Issue 2 Pages 1776-1783  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The goal of this study is to evaluate the current level of light pollution in the night sky at the Haleakala Observatory on the island of Maui in Hawaii. This is accomplished with a numerical model that was tested in the first International Dark Sky Reserve located in Mont-Mégantic National Park in Canada. The model uses ground data on the artificial light sources present in the region of study, geographical data, and remotely sensed data for: 1) the nightly upward radiance; 2) the terrain elevation; and, 3) the ground spectral reflectance of the region. The results of the model give a measure of the current state of the sky spectral radiance at the Haleakala Observatory. Then, using the current state as a reference point, multiple light conversion plans are elaborated and evaluated using the model. We can thus estimate the expected impact of each conversion plan on the night sky radiance spectrum. A complete conversion to white (LEDs) with (CCT) of 4000K and 3000K are contrasted with a conversion using (PC) amber (LEDs). We include recommendations concerning the street lamps to be used in sensitive areas like the cities of Kahului and Kihei and suggest best lighting practices related to the color of lamps used at night.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1907  
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