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Author (up) Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C. D.; Ziskin, D.; Longcore, T.; Rich, C. url  openurl
  Title 'When the lights stay on' – A novel approach to assessing human impact on the environment. Earth. Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Earthzine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ecology  
  Abstract A consequence of the explosive expansion of human civilization has been the global loss of biodiversity and changes to life-sustaining geophysical processes of Earth. The footprint of human occupation is uniquely visible from space in the form of artificial night lighting – ranging from the burning of the rainforest to massive offshore fisheries to omnipresent lights of cities, towns, and villages. This article describes a novel approach to assessing global human impact using satellite observed nighttime lights. The results provide reef managers and governments a first-pass screening tool for reef conservation projects. Sites requiring restoration and precautionary actions can be identified and assessed further in more focused investigations. We hope to create a mental picture for others to see and encourage participation in maintaining and restoring the natural world.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 569  
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Author (up) Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.D.; Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Safran, J.; Strong, A.E.; Eakin, C.M.; Baugh, K.E.; Tuttle, B.T.; Howard, A.T.; Erwin, E.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Geocarto International Abbreviated Journal Geocarto International  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 467-479  
  Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In this article, we present a satellite-based approach to gather information about the threat to coral reefs worldwide. Three chosen reef stressors – development, gas flaring and heavily lit fishing boat activity – are analysed using nighttime lights data derived from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) produced at the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, National Geophysical Data Center (NOAA/NGDC). Nighttime lights represent a direct threat to coral reef ecosystems and are an excellent proxy measure for associated human-caused stressors. A lights proximity index (LPI) is calculated, measuring the distance of coral reef sites to each of the stressors and incorporating the stressor's intensity. Colourized maps visualize the results on a global scale. Area rankings clarify the effects of artificial night lighting on coral reefs on a regional scale. The results should be very useful for reef managers and for state administrations to implement coral reef conservation projects and for the scientific world to conduct further research.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1010-6049 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3198  
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Author (up) Aubrecht, C.; Stojan-Dolar, M.; de Sherbinin, A.; Jaiteh, M.; Longcore, T.; Elvidge, C. url  openurl
  Title Lighting governance for protected areas and beyond – Identifying the urgent need for sustainable management of artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Earthzine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages e61460  
  Keywords Editorial  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 465  
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Author (up) Aulsebrook, A.E.; Connelly, F.; Johnsson, R.D.; Jones, T.M.; Mulder, R.A.; Hall, M.L.; Vyssotski, A.L.; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title White and Amber Light at Night Disrupt Sleep Physiology in Birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; anthropogenic; avian; blue light; circadian rhythms; electroencephalogram; light pollution; light spectra; sleep homeostasis; slow wave sleep; urbanization  
  Abstract Artificial light at night can disrupt sleep in humans [1-4] and other animals [5-10]. A key mechanism for light to affect sleep is via non-visual photoreceptors that are most sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light [11]. To minimize effects of artificial light on sleep, many electronic devices shift from white (blue-rich) to amber (blue-reduced) light in the evening. Switching outdoor lighting from white to amber might also benefit wildlife [12]. However, whether these two colors of light affect sleep similarly in different animals remains poorly understood. Here we show, by measuring brain activity, that both white and amber lighting disrupt sleep in birds but that the magnitude of these effects differs between species. When experimentally exposed to light at night at intensities typical of urban areas, domestic pigeons (Columba livia) and wild-caught Australian magpies (Cracticus tibicen tyrannica) slept less, favored non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep over REM sleep, slept less intensely, and had more fragmented sleep compared to when lights were switched off. In pigeons, these disruptive effects on sleep were similar for white and amber lighting. For magpies, however, amber light had less impact on sleep. Our results demonstrate that amber lighting can minimize sleep disruption in some birds but that this benefit may not be universal.  
  Address School of Life Sciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32707063 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3080  
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Author (up) Aulsebrook, A.E.; Johnsson, R.D.; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light, Sleep and Performance in Diurnal Birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 115-131  
  Keywords Review; Animals  
  Abstract Sleep has a multitude of benefits and is generally considered necessary for optimal performance. Disruption of sleep by extended photoperiods, moonlight and artificial light could therefore impair performance in humans and non-human animals alike. Here, we review the evidence for effects of light on sleep and subsequent performance in birds. There is accumulating evidence that exposure to natural and artificial sources of light regulates and suppresses sleep in diurnal birds. Sleep also benefits avian cognitive performance, including during early development. Nevertheless, multiple studies suggest that light can prolong wakefulness in birds without impairing performance. Although there is still limited research on this topic, these results raise intriguing questions about the adaptive value of sleep. Further research into the links between light, sleep and performance, including the underlying mechanisms and consequences for fitness, could shed new light on sleep evolution and urban ecology.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3328  
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