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Author (up) Davoudian, N.
Title Background lighting clutters: how do they affect visual saliency of urban objects? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation
Volume 5 Issue 1-2 Pages 95-103
Keywords Vision
Abstract The current study aims to create some general guidance for designers to better understand the impact of background lighting in their design and as a result minimize its effect on the visual saliency of urban objects. There are few studies about how lighting clutters can affect and decrease the visual saliency of illuminated urban objects at night. Lack of information in this area has resulted in increasing luminance to be recognized as one of the main tools to enhance the saliency of urban objects at night. To address this matter a study was performed to investigate the effect of proximity of lighting clutters on visual saliency of urban objects. A forced choice pair comparison method was employed, in which two test images of an urban object in different conditions of luminance contrast and proximity of light patterns were compared. Test participants reported in which image the target appeared more salient. Results show there is a progressive increase in saliency value by increasing the gap between the target and the background lighting when the luminance contrast of the target is three or higher. However, the critical area around the object with the highest effect lies between 0.5° and 1° visual angle. Removing light patterns beyond that point creates negligible effect. The findings of this study could inform development of future models of visual recognition in the road environment, models which can address the important effects of environmental context in addition to photometric variables (luminance and contrast) that are the only factors considered in traditional models of ‘Visibility Level.’
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2165-0349 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2527
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Author (up) Davoudian, N.; Raynham, P.; Barrett, E.
Title Disability glare: A study in simulated road lighting conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 46 Issue 6 Pages 695-705
Keywords Vision
Abstract Disability glare is associated with veiling luminance caused by light from bright sources being scattered within the eyes of observers, thereby reducing retinal luminance contrast. This study compares the reduction in observers’ performance in the presence of glare with veiling luminance in the eye, calculated using a non-subjective method. A total of 42 observers performed a target detection task in the presence of a glare source in conditions similar to street lighting at night. Luminance contrast thresholds were measured for each observer under different levels of glare. Results show that, while veiling luminance has a significant effect on the performance of observers, its effect is lower than expected from contrast loss. Furthermore, the performance of observers over the age of 50 is unaffected by increasing the glare level.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2526
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Author (up) de Jong, M.; Lamers, K.P.; Eugster, M.; Ouyang, J.Q.; Da Silva, A.; Mateman, A.C.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.
Title Effects of experimental light at night on extra-pair paternity in a songbird Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 441-448
Keywords animals
Abstract Light pollution is increasing worldwide and significantly affects animal behavior. In birds, these effects include advancement of morning activity and onset of dawn song, which may affect extra-pair paternity. Advanced dawn song of males may stimulate females to engage in extra-pair copulations, and the earlier activity onset may affect the males' mate guarding behavior. Earlier work showed an effect of light at night on extra-pair behavior, but this was in an area with other anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we present a two-year experimental study on effects of light at night on extra-pair paternity of great tits (Parus major). Previously dark natural areas were illuminated with white, red, and green LED lamps and compared to a dark control. In 2014, the proportion of extra-pair young in broods increased with distance to the red and white lamps (i.e., at lower light intensities), but decreased with distance to the poles in the dark control. In 2013, we found no effects on the proportion of extra-pair young. The total number of offspring sired by a male was unaffected by artificial light at night in both years, suggesting that potential changes in female fidelity in pairs breeding close to white and red light did not translate into fitness benefits for the males of these pairs. Artificial light at night might disrupt the natural patterns of extra-pair paternity, possibly negates potential benefits of extra-pair copulations and thus could alter sexual selection processes in wild birds.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29952126 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1953
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Author (up) de Meester, J.; Storch, T.
Title Optimized Performance Parameters for Nighttime Multispectral Satellite Imagery to Analyze Lightings in Urban Areas Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 20 Issue 11 Pages
Keywords Instrumentation; Remote Sensing; high spatial resolution; lighting parameter; lighting type classification; multispectral band optimization; nighttime remote sensing; satellite image simulation; urban area
Abstract Contrary to its daytime counterpart, nighttime visible and near infrared (VIS/NIR) satellite imagery is limited in both spectral and spatial resolution. Nevertheless, the relevance of such systems is unquestioned with applications to, e.g., examine urban areas, derive light pollution, and estimate energy consumption. To determine optimal spectral bands together with required radiometric and spatial resolution, at-sensor radiances are simulated based on combinations of lamp spectra with typical luminances according to lighting standards, surface reflectances, and radiative transfers for the consideration of atmospheric effects. Various band combinations are evaluated for their ability to differentiate between lighting types and to estimate the important lighting parameters: efficacy to produce visible light, percentage of emissions attributable to the blue part of the spectrum, and assessment of the perceived color of radiation sources. The selected bands are located in the green, blue, yellow-orange, near infrared, and red parts of the spectrum and include one panchromatic band. However, these nighttime bands tailored to artificial light emissions differ significantly from the typical daytime bands focusing on surface reflectances. Compared to existing or proposed nighttime or daytime satellites, the recommended characteristics improve, e.g., classification of lighting types by >10%. The simulations illustrate the feasible improvements in nocturnal VIS/NIR remote sensing which will lead to advanced applications.
Address German Aerospace Center (DLR), Earth Observation Center (EOC), Munchener Str. 20, 82234 Wessling, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32532117 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3006
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Author (up) Deal, S.
Title Striking a Balance Between Starry Skies and Urban Illumination Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Water Log Abbreviated Journal
Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Planning; Ecology; Skyglow; Commentary
Abstract For countless centuries, people have looked up at the night sky in awe and wonder. However, the starry night skies have been increasingly subsumed by ambient light from cities. Many urban areas across the world are over illuminated, leaving city dwellers unable to take in the natural day-night pattern of the skies. This disruption is not merely a setback for stargazers; excessive lighting from city streets can have an adverse impact on wildlife and human welfare. Sea turtle hatchlings, which instinctively crawl towards the night sky to reach the safety of the ocean, may be enticed by the stronger

glow of nearby streetlights. Artificial lights also steer migratory bird species off course and interfere with their ability to detect ideal conditions for nesting.

1 Overly bright lighting in residential areas can disrupt human sleeping

habits as well. These impacts associated with excess lighting

show that cities have an important role to play in regulating

lighting sources
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2944
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