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Author (up) Delhey, K.; Peters, A.
Title Implications for conservation of anthropogenic impacts on visual communication and camouflage Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol
Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 30-39
Keywords Conservation
Abstract Anthropogenic environmental impacts can disrupt the sensory environment of animals and affect important processes from mate choice to predator avoidance. Currently these effects are best understood for auditory and chemo-sensory modalities and recent reviews highlight their importance for conservation. Here we summarise how anthropogenic changes to the visual environment (ambient light, transmission, backgrounds) affect visual communication and camouflage, and highlight implications for conservation. These implications are particularly evident for disrupted camouflage due to its tight links with survival while the conservation importance of impaired visual communication is less well-documented. Such effects can be potentially severe when they affect critical processes such as pollination or species recognition. However, when impaired mate choice does not lead to hybridization, the conservation consequences are less clear. We suggest that the demographic effects of human impacts on visual communication and camouflage will be particularly strong when: (a) human-induced modifications to the visual environment are evolutionary novel, that is, very different from natural variation, (b) affected species and populations have low levels of intraspecific (genotypic and phenotypic) variation and low levels of behavioural, sensory or physiological plasticity and (c) the processes affected are directly related to survival (camouflage), species recognition, or number of offspring produced, rather than offspring quality or attractiveness. The evidence summarized here suggests that anthropogenic effects on the visual environment might be of similar conservation concerns as those on other sensory modalities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address 25 Rainforest Walk, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, 3800, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27604521 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1525
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Author (up) Deng, J., Che, T., Xiao, C., Wang, S., Dai, L., & Meerzhan, A.
Title Suitability Analysis of Ski Areas in China: An Integrated Study Based on Natural and Socioeconomic Conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Cryosphere Abbreviated Journal The Cryosphere
Volume 13 Issue Pages 2149–2167
Keywords Remote Sensing; China; Skiing; winter sports; GIS; Asia
Abstract The successful bidding of the 2022 Winter Olympics (Beijing 2022, officially known as the XXIV Olympic Winter Games) has greatly stimulated Chinese enthusiasm to participate in winter sports. Consequently, the Chinese ski industry is rapidly booming driven by enormous market demand and government support. However, investing in ski area at an unreasonable location will cause problems both from economic perspective (in terms of operation and management) as well as geographical concerns (such as environmental degradation). To evaluate the suitability of a ski area based on scientific 20 metrics has since become a prerequisite to the sustainable development of ski industry. In this study, we evaluate the locational suitability of ski areas in China by integrating their natural and socioeconomic conditions using linear weighted method based on geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis combined with remote sensing, online and field survey data. Key indexes for evaluating the natural suitability include snow cover, air temperature, topographic conditions, groundwater, and vegetation, whereas socioeconomic suitability is evaluated based on economic conditions, accessibility of transportation, 25 distance to tourist attractions, and distance to cities. As such, an integrated metrics considering both natural and socioeconomic suitability is defined to be a threshold and used to identify the suitability of a candidate region for ski area development. The results show that 92% of existing ski areas are located in areas with an integrated index greater than 0.5. In contrary, a ski area is considered to be a dismal prospect when the locational integrated index is less than 0.5. Finally, corresponding development strategies for decision-makers are proposed based on the multi-criteria metrics, which will be extended to incorporate potential influences from future climate change and socioeconomic development.
Address Heihe Remote Sensing Experimental Research Station, Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing of Gansu Province, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, China; chetao(at)lzb.ac.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Copernicus Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2522
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Author (up) Deng, K.; Zhu, B.-C.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, Q.-H.; Wang, T.-L.; Wang, J.-C.; Cui, J.-G.
Title Mate choice decisions of female serrate-legged small treefrogs are affected by ambient light under natural, but not enhanced artificial nocturnal light conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behavioural Processes
Volume in press Issue Pages 103997
Keywords Animals; frogs; amphibians; serrate-legged small treefrogs; Kurixalus odontotarsus
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread anthropogenic stimulus that can significantly alter nocturnal animals’ behavior, from migration to foraging to vocal communication. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the mate choice decisions of female serrate-legged small treefrogs (Kurixalus odontotarsus) were influenced by ambient light intensity. Standard two-speaker phonotaxis tests were conducted in a sound attenuating chamber. We set four light conditions (I-IV, from low to high) based on a range of light intensities from the maximum natural light at night (i.e., full moon) to that of the actual calling sites, which had artificial light. Contrary to our prediction, female frogs showed a preference for calls on the bright side in treatment I when they were exposed to identical stimuli. However, females preferred longer calls on the dim side to shorter calls on the bright side in this treatment. In addition, there were no significant effects of choice side, light treatment or their interaction on leave time or choice time. Our results suggest that females are more attracted to mates in bright light under natural nocturnal light conditions, but the preference for longer calls is not altered in serrate-legged small treefrogs.
Address Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2730
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Author (up) Depner, C.M.; Melanson, E.L.; McHill, A.W.; Wright, K.P.J.
Title Mistimed food intake and sleep alters 24-hour time-of-day patterns of the human plasma proteome Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 115 Issue 23 Pages E5390-E5399
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Proteomics holds great promise for understanding human physiology, developing health biomarkers, and precision medicine. However, how much the plasma proteome varies with time of day and is regulated by the master circadian suprachiasmatic nucleus brain clock, assessed here by the melatonin rhythm, is largely unknown. Here, we assessed 24-h time-of-day patterns of human plasma proteins in six healthy men during daytime food intake and nighttime sleep in phase with the endogenous circadian clock (i.e., circadian alignment) versus daytime sleep and nighttime food intake out of phase with the endogenous circadian clock (i.e., circadian misalignment induced by simulated nightshift work). We identified 24-h time-of-day patterns in 573 of 1,129 proteins analyzed, with 30 proteins showing strong regulation by the circadian cycle. Relative to circadian alignment, the average abundance and/or 24-h time-of-day patterns of 127 proteins were altered during circadian misalignment. Altered proteins were associated with biological pathways involved in immune function, metabolism, and cancer. Of the 30 circadian-regulated proteins, the majority peaked between 1400 hours and 2100 hours, and these 30 proteins were associated with basic pathways involved in extracellular matrix organization, tyrosine kinase signaling, and signaling by receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2. Furthermore, circadian misalignment altered multiple proteins known to regulate glucose homeostasis and/or energy metabolism, with implications for altered metabolic physiology. Our findings demonstrate the circadian clock, the behavioral wake-sleep/food intake-fasting cycle, and interactions between these processes regulate 24-h time-of-day patterns of human plasma proteins and help identify mechanisms of circadian misalignment that may contribute to metabolic dysregulation.
Address Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29784788 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1916
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Author (up) Deppe, L.; Rowley, O.; Rowe, L.K.; Shi, N.; McArthur, N.; Gooday, O.; Goldstien, S.J.
Title Investigation of fallout events in Hutton’s shearwaters (Puffinus huttoni) associated with artificial lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Notornis Abbreviated Journal
Volume 64 Issue 4 Pages 181-191
Keywords Animals
Abstract The risk of disorientation by artificial lights and subsequent ‘fallout’ has become a widely recognised issue for nocturnal procellariiform species. Using data from community-based rescue campaigns and systematic research, we assessed the characteristics of fallout events observed in fledglings of the threatened New Zealand endemic Hutton’s shearwater (Puffinus huttoni) or Kaikōura tītī. Despite strong annual variation in observed fallout numbers, the proportion of annually produced fledglings collected as ‘fallout birds’ remained below 1% each year. Among those, more than 80% survived due to community rescue efforts. Fallout was found to increase significantly during new moon, while weather effects remained inconclusive. Most fallout occurred within brightly lit areas of Kaikōura township, particularly along its coastal roads. High light source densities and high wattage lights appeared to be influential in some areas but could only partly explain the spatial distribution of fallout at this small scale.
Address
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2102
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