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Author (up) Dhaliwal, S.S.; Keller, J.; Le, H.-N.; Lewin, D.S.
Title Sleep Disturbance among Pregnant Women: The Influence of Environmental and Contextual Factors Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal
Volume 42 Issue Supplement_1 Pages A270-A271
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Introduction

Disrupted sleep during pregnancy affects nearly 85% of women. This can contribute to psychological distress and antenatal depression. The aims of the current project were to test whether (a) poorer subjective sleep quality contributed to greater depression and anxiety symptoms, and (b) contextual factors predicted clinically significant sleep disturbance after adjusting for socioeconomic status (SES).

Methods

In a mixed-methods study, 418 pregnant women (age: M=32.4 years; gestation: M=28.4 weeks, SD=8.4 weeks; 58% Black) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), measures of pregnancy-related physiological factors, and provided details about their sleep environment. They also rated perinatal depression, anxiety, and SES (Hollingshead and MacArthur Ladder). Sixty-two women completed these measures again later in pregnancy (gestation M = 34.2 weeks). A subset of seven women underwent actigraphy (9-nights) during their third trimester. Logistic regressions adjusted for age, BMI, race, sleep disordered breathing, and gestational week.

Results

Subjective sleep quality was significantly poorer among Black women and those with higher BMI. Physiological factors (i.e., restless leg syndrome, nocturnal urination, and acid reflux) explained subjective sleep disturbance after accounting for gestational week (ps<.01). Among women with history of psychopathology (n=221), sleep disturbance was significantly related to anxiety and depression symptoms (ps<.01), with greater sleep disturbance (PSQI score >5) predicting clinically significant antenatal depression (B = .38, p<.05). However, those who rated their social standing as higher reported lower sleep disturbance throughout pregnancy, even after adjusting for mood and anxiety (B= .86, SE =.41; p<.05). There was a dose-response positive association between sleep disturbance and depression severity among Black women only (B = .89; p<.05). Among lower SES Black women, environmental factors (greater ambient noise and light pollution) partially mediated this effect (B= .45, SE =.17; p<.01).

Conclusion

Sociocontextual factors may explain sleep disturbance severity among low-income pregnant Black women, above and beyond traditional metrics of SES. Higher subjective SES may be protective against sleep disturbance and psychiatric distress. Assessments of sleep during pregnancy should account for physiological considerations and environmental disruptions, alongside mood and anxiety.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2323
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Author (up) Dias, K.S.; Dosso, E.S.; Hall, A.S.; Schuch, A.P.; Tozetti, A.M.
Title Ecological light pollution affects anuran calling season, daily calling period, and sensitivity to light in natural Brazilian wetlands Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Science of Nature Abbreviated Journal Sci Nat
Volume 106 Issue 7-8 Pages 46
Keywords Animals
Abstract Ecological light pollution alters an environment's light cycle, potentially affecting photoperiod-controlled behavior. Anurans, for example, generally breed nocturnally, and the influence of light pollution on their natural history may therefore be especially strong. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by measuring male calling behavior of anuran communities in natural wetlands in southern Brazil exposed or not exposed to street lights. We recorded seasonal and diel calling activity and calling response to a light pulse. The peak calling season differed between continuously lit and unlit locations with most species in illuminated wetlands shortening their calling season and calling earlier in the year. In unlit breeding sites, Boana pulchella, Pseudis minuta, and Pseudopaludicola falcipes confined their calling activity to well-defined hours of the night, but in continuously lit areas, these species called more continuously through the night. A 2-minute light pulse inhibited calling, but only in unlit wetlands. After a light pulse, frogs quickly resumed calling-suggesting acclimatization to brief artificial light exposure. Our field experiment presents a convincing example of ecological light pollution showing that artificial light alters the seasonal and diel calling time of some South American wetland anurans. It also documents their acclimatization to brief lighting when being continuously exposed to light.
Address Laboratorio de Ecologia de Vertebrados Terrestres, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos – UNISINOS, Campus Sao Leopoldo, Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, 93020-190, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-1042 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31280391 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2560
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Author (up) Dick, R.
Title The Biological Basis for the Canadian Guideline for Outdoor Lighting 1. General Scotobiology Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Abbreviated Journal
Volume 114 Issue 3 Pages 122-126
Keywords Biology; Ecology
Abstract The subject of limiting outdoor lighting seems straightforward- it saves electricity and reduces glare, but society has a predilection for activity at night that requires more than natural light. This extends beyond urban areas. “Cottage country” is well lit along the shoreline, and even campgrounds filled with amateur astronomers have lots of unshielded lights. Although these tend to be red, they still undermine our night vision (Dick, 2016) and change the nocturnal ambience. The main problem of whether outdoor lighting is good or bad depends on who is judge. Is there a less equivocal way to assess or define acceptable outdoor lighting, especially in rural areas? Must rural lighting follow “Best Practices” for cities? This is the first in a series of papers that will discuss the science behind the ecological impacts of artificial (anthropogenic) light at night. It will propose rational solutions to reduce these impacts and will define the characteristics of artificial light that minimize these disruptions that we call lighting with “low-ecological impact.” Although taking an ecological approach to outdoor lighting is unusual, we have observed that if the nocturnal environment is preserved for wildlife, it is usually sufficient for astronomy. Although it is understood that observatories may require a curfew during the three weeks centred on the new Moon. This first paper will set the stage for this somewhat unorthodox exploration into light.
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2945
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Author (up) Dickerson, A.L.; Hall, M.L.; Jones, T.M.
Title The effect of variation in moonlight on nocturnal song of a diurnal bird species Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 74 Issue 9 Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract The lunar cycle is known to affect the behaviour of strictly nocturnal species, but for diurnal species that are periodically active during the night, this has been less investigated. Nocturnal bird song is relatively common in diurnal species, yet research on this behaviour accounts for little of the research on avian vocalisations. This is surprising given that diurnal species are adapted for bright environments and therefore may be particularly sensitive to change in the lunar cycles. We used automated bioacoustic recorders and automatic song detection software to measure nocturnal song rate in a diurnal bird where both sexes sing, the willie wagtail (Rhipidura leucophrys). We deployed recorders at eight locations across four naturally dark sites resulting in 457 h of nocturnal audio. We confirmed anecdotal evidence suggesting that willie wagtails are prolific nocturnal singers during the breeding season and demonstrate that while both male and females sing during the day, nocturnal song is largely sung by males. Moreover, we show that nocturnal song increased with lunar illumination, contrasting with previous research on other diurnal species that sing at night. Our data allow us to hypothesise possible functions for nocturnal song in this species, such as territory defence or mate attraction.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3084
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Author (up) Dickinson, L.G.; Boselly, S.E.; Burgmann, W.S.
Title Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) – User's Guide Type Report
Year 1974 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume ADA007678 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The capabilities of the spacecraft, sensors, and data processor for the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program are described. Many meteorological and geophysical uses of these data are examined, and examples used to illustrate the capabilities of the system to tailor the imagery for a large variety of present and future users.
Address AIR WEATHER SERVICE SCOTT AFB IL
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2387
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