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Author (up) Amichai, E.; Kronfeld-Schor, N.
Title Artificial Light at Night Promotes Activity Throughout the Night in Nesting Common Swifts (Apus apus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 11052
Keywords Animals
Abstract The use of artificial light at night (ALAN) is a rapidly expanding anthropogenic effect that transforms nightscapes throughout the world, causing light pollution that affects ecosystems in a myriad of ways. One of these is changing or shifting activity rhythms, largely synchronized by light cues. We used acoustic loggers to record and quantify activity patterns during the night of a diurnal bird – the common swift – in a nesting colony exposed to extremely intensive artificial illumination throughout the night at Jerusalem's Western Wall. We compared that to activity patterns at three other colonies exposed to none, medium, or medium-high ALAN. We found that in the lower-intensity ALAN colonies swifts ceased activity around sunset, later the more intense the lighting. At the Western Wall, however, swifts remained active throughout the night. This may have important implications for the birds' physiology, breeding cycle, and fitness, and may have cascading effects on their ecosystems.
Address School of Zoology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31363144 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2594
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Author (up) An, K.; Zhao, H.; Miao, Y.; Xu, Q.; Li, Y.-F.; Ma, Y.-Q.; Shi, Y.-M.; Shen, J.-W.; Meng, J.-J.; Yao, Y.-G.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, J.-T.; Bao, J.; Zhang, M.; Xue, T.
Title A circadian rhythm-gated subcortical pathway for nighttime-light-induced depressive-like behaviors in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Nature Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Besides generating vision, light modulates various physiological functions, including mood. While light therapy applied in the daytime is known to have anti-depressive properties, excessive light exposure at night has been reportedly associated with depressive symptoms. The neural mechanisms underlying this day-night difference in the effects of light are unknown. Using a light-at-night (LAN) paradigm in mice, we showed that LAN induced depressive-like behaviors without disturbing the circadian rhythm. This effect was mediated by a neural pathway from retinal melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells to the dorsal perihabenular nucleus (dpHb) to the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Importantly, the dpHb was gated by the circadian rhythm, being more excitable at night than during the day. This indicates that the ipRGC-->dpHb-->NAc pathway preferentially conducts light signals at night, thereby mediating LAN-induced depressive-like behaviors. These findings may be relevant when considering the mental health effects of the prevalent nighttime illumination in the industrial world.
Address Institute for Stem Cell and Regeneration, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. xuetian@ustc.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1097-6256 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32483349 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2978
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Author (up) Anand, A.; Kim, D.-H.
Title Pandemic Induced Changes in Economic Activity around African Protected Areas Captured through Night-Time Light Data Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 314
Keywords Economics; VIIRS; night-time lights; COVID-19; pandemic; protected areas; wildlife tourism
Abstract The importance of tourism for development is widely recognized. Travel restrictions imposed to contain the spread of COVID-19 have brought tourism to a halt. Tourism is one of the key sectors driving change in Africa and is based exclusively on natural assets, with wildlife being the main attraction. Economic activities, therefore, are clustered around conservation and protected areas. We used night-time light data as a proxy measure for economic activity to assess change due to the pandemic. Our analysis shows that overall, 75 percent of the 8427 protected areas saw a decrease in light intensity in varying degrees in all countries and across IUCN protected area categories, including in popular protected area destinations, indicating a reduction in tourism-related economic activities. As countries discuss COVID-19 recovery, the methods using spatially explicit data illustrated in this paper can assess the extent of change, inform decision-making, and prioritize recovery efforts.
Address Independent Evaluation Office, Global Environment Facility, Washington, DC 20006, USA; aanand2 ( at ) thegef.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3390
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Author (up) Anbalagan, M.; Dauchy, R.; Xiang, S.; Robling, A.; Blask, D.; Rowan, B.; Hill, S.
Title SAT-337 Disruption Of The Circadian Melatonin Signal By Dim Light At Night Promotes Bone-lytic Breast Cancer Metastases Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of the Endocrine Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 3 Issue Supplement_1 Pages
Keywords Human Health; Cancer; Breast cancer; melatonin; shift work; mouse models
Abstract Breast cancer metastasis to bone is a major source of morbidity and mortality in women with advanced metastatic breast cancer. Morbidity from metastasis to bone is compounded by the fact that they cannot be surgically removed and can only be treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Thus, there is critical need to develop new treatment strategies that kill bone metastatic tumors and reduce osteolytic lesions to improve patient quality of life and extend patient survival. Circadian rhythms are daily cycles of ~24 h that control many if not most physiologic processes and their disruption by exposure to light at night (LAN) or jet lag has been shown to be strongly associated with the development of cancer, particularly breast cancer. We have found that disruption of the anti-cancer circadian hormone melatonin (MLT) by light at night can significantly enhance the metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Our work supports the report of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that shift work is a “probable human carcinogen” and highlights the association between exposure to light at night and invasive breast cancer. We recently reported that human breast tumor xenografts grown in athymic nude female rats housed in a photoperiod of 12h light at day: 12h dim light at night (dLAN, 0.2 lux – blocks the nighttime circadian MLT signal), display resistance to doxorubicin (Dox). More importantly, tumor growth and drug resistance could be blocked by the administration of Dox in circadian alignment with nocturnal MLT during dLAN. Our recent preliminary studies show that poorly invasive ERα positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, when injected into the tibia (to mimic bone metastatic disease) of Foxn1nu athymic nude mice (which produce a strong circadian nighttime melatonin signal) housed in a dLAN photoperiod (suppressed nocturnal MLT production) developed full blown breast cancer tumors in bone (P<0.05) that are highly osteolytic (P<0.05). Moreover, patients with metastatic breast cancer are routinely treated with doxorubicin, which itself can promote bone damage. Our studies demonstrate that MLT slows the growth of metastatic breast cancer in bone but that the chrono-therapeutic use of doxorubicin in circadian alignment with melatonin in Foxn1nu mice with tibial breast tumors, reduced tumor growth in bone, reduced bone erosion, and promoted the formation of new bone. Successful use of this chronotherapeutic use of Dox and MLT in clinical trials increasing efficacy in preventing or suppressing breast cancer metastasis to bone while decreasing toxic side effects of doxorubicin would provide a revolutionary advancement in the treatment of bone metastatic breast cancer and decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer metastasis to bone.
Address Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2472-1972 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2433
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Author (up) Andrade-Núñez, M.J.; Aide, T.M.
Title The Socio-Economic and Environmental Variables Associated with Hotspots of Infrastructure Expansion in South America Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 116
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The built environment, defined as all human-made infrastructure, is increasing to fulfill the demand for human settlements, productive systems, mining, and industries. Due to the profound direct and indirect impacts that the built environment produces on natural ecosystems, it is considered a major driver of land change and biodiversity loss, and a major component of global environmental change. In South America, a global producer of minerals and agricultural commodities, and a region with many biodiversity hotspots, infrastructure expanded considerably between 2001 and 2011. This expansion occurred mainly in rural areas, towns, and sprawling suburban areas that were not previously developed. Herein, we characterized the areas of major infrastructure expansion between 2001 and 2011 in South America. We used nighttime light data, land use maps, and socio-economic and environmental variables to answer the following questions: (1) Where are the hotspots of infrastructure expansion located? and (2) What combination of socio-economic and environmental variables are associated with infrastructure expansion? Hotspots of infrastructure expansion encompass 70% (337,310 km2) of the total infrastructure expansion occurring between 2001 and 2011 across South America. Urban population and economic growth, mean elevation, and mean road density were the main variables associated with the hotspots, grouping them into eight clusters. Furthermore, within the hotspots, woody vegetation increased around various urban centers, and several areas showed a large increase in agriculture. Investments in large scale infrastructure projects, and the expansion and intensification of productive systems (e.g., agriculture and meat production) play a dominant role in the increase of infrastructure across South America. We expect that under the current trends of globalization and land changes, infrastructure will continue increasing and expanding into no-development areas and remote places. Therefore, to fully understand the direct and indirect impacts of land use change in natural ecosystems studies of infrastructure need to expand to areas beyond cities. This will provide better land management alternatives for the conservation of biodiversity as well as peri-urban areas across South America.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2798
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