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Author (up) Baekelandt, S.; Milla, S.; Cornet, V.; Flamion, E.; Ledore, Y.; Redivo, B.; Antipine, S.; Mandiki, S.N.M.; Houndji, A.; El Kertaoui, N.; Kestemont, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Seasonal simulated photoperiods influence melatonin release and immune markers of pike perch Sander lucioperca Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 2650  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Melatonin is considered as the time-keeping hormone acting on important physiological functions of teleosts. While the influence of melatonin on reproduction and development is well described, its potential role on immune functions has little been considered. In order to better define an immune modulation by the melatonin hormone, we hypothesized that natural variations of photoperiod and subsequent changes in melatonin release profile may act on immune status of pikeperch. Therefore, we investigated during 70 days the effects of two photoperiod regimes simulating the fall and spring in western Europe, on pikeperch physiological and immune responses. Samples were collected at 04:00 and 15:00 at days 1, 37 and 70. Growth, plasma melatonin levels, innate immune markers and expression of immune-relevant genes in head kidney tissue were assessed. While growth and stress level were not affected by the seasonal simulated photoperiods, nocturnal levels of plasma melatonin were photoperiod-dependent. Innate immune markers, including lysozyme, complement, peroxidase and phagocytic activities, were stimulated by the fall-simulated photoperiod and a significant correlation was made with plasma melatonin. In addition to bring the first evidence of changes in fish immunocompetence related to photoperiod, our results provide an additional indication supporting the immunomodulatory action of melatonin in teleosts.  
  Address Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), Institute of Life, Earth & Environment, University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, Namur, B-5000, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32060347; PMCID:PMC7021833 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2942  
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Author (up) Bagan, H.; Borjigin, H.; Yamagata, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing nighttime lights for mapping the urban areas of 50 cities across the globe Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science Abbreviated Journal Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science  
  Volume Issue Pages 2399808317752926  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Nighttime data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System have been widely used to map urban/built-up areas (hereafter referred to as “built-up area”), but to date there has not been a geographically comprehensive evaluation of the effectiveness of using nighttime lights data to map urban areas. We created accurate, convenient, and scalable grid cells based on Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System nighttime light pixels. We then calculated the density of Landsat-derived built-up areas within each grid cell. We explored the relationship between Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System nighttime lights data and the density of built-up areas to assess the utility of nighttime lights for mapping urban areas in 50 cities across the globe. We found that the brightness of nighttime lights was only in moderate agreement with the density of built-up areas; moreover, correlations between nighttime lights and Landsat-derived built-up areas were weak. Even in relatively sparsely populated urban regions (where the density of the built-up area is less than 20%), the highest correlation coefficient (R2) was only 0.4. Furthermore, nighttime lights showed lighted areas that extended beyond the area of large cities, and nighttime lights reduced the area of small cities. The results suggest that it is difficult to use the regression model to calibrate the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System nighttime lights to fit urban built up areas.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2399-8083 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1795  
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Author (up) Bagci, S.; Sabir, H.; Muller, A.; Reiter, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of altered photoperiod due to COVID-19 lockdown on pregnant women and their fetuses Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Covid-19; circadian disruption; fetus; lockdown; melatonin; pregnant Women  
  Abstract Maternal circadian rhythms provide highly important input into the entrainment and programming of fetal and newborn circadian rhythms. The light-dark cycle is an important regulator of the internal biological clock. Even though pregnant women spend a greater part of the day at home during the latter stages of pregnancy, natural light exposure is crucial for the fetus. The current recommended COVID-19 lockdown might dramatically alter normal environmental lighting conditions of pregnant women, resulting in exposure to extremely low levels of natural daylight and high-intensity artificial light sources during both day and night. This article summarizes the potential effects on pregnant woman and their fetuses due to prolonged exposure to altered photoperiod and as consequence altered circadian system, known as chronodisruption, that may result from the COVID-19 lockdown.  
  Address Department of Cell Systems and Anatomy, UT Health San Antonio , San Antonio, Texas, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32519912 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3007  
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Author (up) Bailey, F.; Sparks, C.P.; Seabrook, A.H.; Vignoles, W.A.; Trotter, A.P.; Gaster, L.; Cooper, W.R.; Shaw, C.M.; Morris, J.T.; Russell, C.N.; Edgcumbe, K.; Boot, H.L.P.; Dow, J.S.; Fedden, S.E.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Sexton, F.P.; Wilkinson, H.D.; Scott, E.K.; Hollis, E.P.; Pearce, S.L.; Frith, J.; Angus, H.W.; Cooper, A.G.; Moon, O.; Sells, F.; Crews, H.C.; Solomon, M.; Chattock, R.A.; Sumpner, W.E.; Augold, A.E.; Morcom, R.K.; Harrison, H.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Discussion on: “Street lighting by modern electric lamps” Type Journal Article
  Year 1911 Publication Journal of the Institution of Electrical Engineers Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 46 Issue 205 Pages 46-91  
  Keywords Lighting; Commentary  
  Abstract  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-0612 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2740  
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Author (up) Bailey, L.A.; Brigham, R.M.; Bohn, S.J.; Boyles, J.G.; Smit, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An experimental test of the allotonic frequency hypothesis to isolate the effects of light pollution on bat prey selection Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia  
  Volume 190 Issue 2 Pages 367–374  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; bats; moths; insects; mammals  
  Abstract Artificial lights may be altering interactions between bats and moth prey. According to the allotonic frequency hypothesis (AFH), eared moths are generally unavailable as prey for syntonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies between 20 and 50 kHz within the hearing range of eared moths) due to the moths' ability to detect syntonic bat echolocation. Syntonic bats therefore feed mainly on beetles, flies, true bugs, and non-eared moths. The AFH is expected to be violated around lights where eared moths are susceptible to exploitation by syntonic bats because moths' evasive strategies become less effective. The hypothesis has been tested to date almost exclusively in areas with permanent lighting, where the effects of lights on bat diets are confounded with other aspects of human habitat alteration. We undertook diet analysis in areas with short-term, localized artificial lighting to isolate the effects of artificial lighting and determine if syntonic and allotonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies outside the hearing range of eared moths) consumed more moths under conditions of artificial lights than in natural darkness. We found that syntonic bats increased their consumption of moth prey under experimentally lit conditions, likely owing to a reduction in the ability of eared moths to evade the bats. Eared moths may increase in diets of generalist syntonic bats foraging around artificial light sources, as opposed to allotonic species and syntonic species with a more specialized diet.  
  Address Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown, 6140, South Africa. b.smit@ru.ac.za  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31139944 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2511  
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