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Author Ruchin, A.B.
Title Effect of illumination on fish and amphibian: development, growth, physiological and biochemical processes Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Reviews in Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Rev. Aquacult.
Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 567-600
Keywords Review; Animals
Abstract Being one of the main environmental factors, the light factor influences many aspects of animal life. Photoperiod, light intensity (illumination) and wavelength are the primary periodic factors. There is a review that discusses the role of illumination on various life processes of aquatic anamnia vertebrates (fish and amphibians). The effect of light on the development, growth, respiration, consumption and efficiency of food conversion, hormone release, reproduction and behaviour of fish and amphibians has been studied. Illumination influences differently a significant number of physiological and biochemical processes and reactions of anamnia vertebrates at various development stages. The obtained results show that the nature of exposure to light is species‐specific and corresponds to the ecological niche of species. Illumination influences both positively and negatively the development, growth and other physiological processes of fish and amphibians. Illumination plays a special role during the first feeding of fish in the environment and aquaculture. There are positive and negative behavioural responses of fish to light. However, it is not always possible to distinguish fish species with only a negative or only a positive reaction to light. The quality of the reaction can be influenced by the stage of development of eggs or larvae, age characteristics, feeding status, season, time, the physiological state of fish, morbidity, etc. A promising area of research is the study of the influence of light on the hormonal status of the body and reproduction of fish. Also, the light pollution and its influence on the physiology of anamnia vertebrates are important.
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ISSN 1753-5123 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3262
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Author Timothy, C. A.; Emmanuel, O.
Title Phototactic Response of Two Spotted Cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus De Geer) to Electric Bulb Light Colours and Types Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Agricultural Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 66-72
Keywords Animals
Abstract This study examined the phototactic response of two spotted cricket (G. bimaculatus) to incandescent and LED bulb light of different colours. Light traps fitted with 25 Watts incandescent bulbs and 3 Watts Light Emitting Diode (LED) of different colours (red, yellow, green, blue and white) were used. Also included was a control trap. The traps were operated from 1800hr to 2400hr. G. bimaculatus collected were counted and the data subjected to variance analysis. Student Newman Keul’s test was used to separate significantly different means at 5% level of probability. Relationship between light intensity and insect density was assessed by correlation and linear regression analysis. Results indicated that LED had higher mean intensity despite lower wattage and that, Blue colour had the highest mean intensity (736.80 Lux) among the LEDs and white (1094.20 Lux) among the incandescent bulbs. Statistical analysis showed that differences in attractiveness among LED bulb colours were due to random variation (p = 0.17); however was significant (p < 0.001) among incandescent bulbs. Of the total G. bimaculatus collected attracted, 93.7% was by LED bulbs with blue LED bulb alone attracting 57.1%. Light intensity was positively and significantly correlated with density of G. bimaculatus attracted for both LED (r = 0.92, R2 = 84.4%) and incandescent (r = 0.96, R2 = 92.5%) bulbs. Higher attraction of G. bimaculatus to blue coloured LED bulbs could be attributed to preference and/or high light intensity. Blue LED bulbs of higher intensity can thus be used to manipulate G. bimaculatus for man’s benefit.
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Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3263
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Author Tatro, K.
Title Light Energy: Our Wasted Resource Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Consilience Abbreviated Journal
Volume 22 Issue Pages 65-72
Keywords Energy; Commentary
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a form of visual pollution and energy waste that is often overlooked. The International Dark Sky Association estimates that 30% of all lighting is strictly for the outdoors. Furthermore, 30% of all outdoor lighting is wasted, used (1) when not needed, or (2) pointing directly upwards. In 2017, the US wasted approximately 60 billion kilowatt hours (kWh), translating to a loss of more than $6.3 billion and CO2 emissions in excess of 23 billion pounds. ALAN has been linked to reduced production of melatonin, the body’s sleep-regulating hormone, which is associated with increased risk of hormonal cancers including breast and prostate cancer. In fact, the World Health Organization (WHO) now lists shift work as a type II risk for cancer. Light at night threatens migratory birds, a majority of which fly at night presumably using constellations as their guide. Light pollution paints the sky black, pushing astronomers to ever-shrinking dark zones suitable for studying the universe. In the most severely affected cities, only a handful of stars can be seen where once thousands dazzled gazers. Society’s overreliance on ALAN has resulted in energy waste, adverse health effects, and pervasive pollution contributing to climate change and concealing our starry night sky.
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Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3264
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Author Tang, C.; Sun, R.; Lian, Z.; Zhu, W.
Title PLSMS model for restoration of the details concealed by light sources in nighttime hazed image Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Signal, Image and Video Processing Abbreviated Journal SIViP
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract In the popular atmospheric scattering model applied to image dehazed, the scatter from the adjacent light sources on the camera sensor which has degraded the image quality is neglected, especially when some artificial light sources exist. Therefore, in the dehazing results, the light sources are always much brighter than those in the original image in order to enhance the majority details in the dark regions, which causes the details around the light sources to be obscured. We propose a novel image restoration model mainly based on point light source multiple scattering theory. An observed hazed image can be described as a linear combination of light being reflected from an imaged object itself and its multiple scattering component. The restoration quality of the artificial light sources and details around them may be improved by suppressing the multiple scattering which can be simulated by an APSF function. The key of our model is to find the appropriate APSF kernels by analysis and some experiments. Comparisons and evaluations of our restoration results with those from popular algorithms show that ours is better in details and colors recovery in dealing with light sources in nighttime hazed images.
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Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3265
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Author Elkins, C.; Van Iersel, M. W.
Title Supplemental Far-red Light-emitting Diode Light Increases Growth of Foxglove Seedlings Under Sole-source Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication HortTechnology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 30 Issue 5 Pages 564-569
Keywords Plants
Abstract Seedlings may be grown indoors where environmental conditions can be precisely controlled to ensure consistent and reliable production. The optimal spectrum for production under sole-source lighting is currently unknown. Far-red light (λ = 700–800 nm) typically is not a significant part of the spectrum of light-emitting diode (LED) grow lights. However, far-red light is photosynthetically active and can enhance leaf elongation, which may result in larger leaves and increased light interception. We hypothesized that adding far-red light to sole-source lighting would increase the growth of ‘Dalmatian Peach’ foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) seedlings grown under white LED lights, potentially shortening production times. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of far-red light intensities, ranging from 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1, on the growth and morphology of foxglove seedlings. Foxglove seedlings were grown in a growth chamber with a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 186 ± 6.4 μmol·m−2·s−1 and supplemental far-red light intensities ranging from 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1. As far-red light increased, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, plant height, and plant height/number of leaves increased by 38% (P = 0.004), 20% (P = 0.029), 38% (P = 0.025), and 34% (P = 0.024), respectively, while root weight fraction decreased 16% (P = 0.034). Although we expected supplemental far-red light to induce leaf and/or stem expansion, specific leaf area and compactness (two measures of morphology) were unaffected. Because a 37% increase in total photon flux density (PPFD plus far-red light) resulted in a 34.5% increase in total plant dry weight, the increased growth likely was due to increased photosynthesis rather than a shade-acclimation response. The growth response was linear across the 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1 range of far-fed light tested, so we were unable to determine a saturating far-red photon flux density.
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Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3266
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