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Author Lowden, A.; Ozturk, G.; Reynolds, A.; Bjorvatn, B.
Title Working Time Society consensus statements: Evidence based interventions using light to improve circadian adaptation to working hours Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Industrial Health Abbreviated Journal Ind Health
Volume 57 Issue 2 Pages 213-227
Keywords Human Health; Review; Occupational Health; circadian adaptation; Shift work
Abstract Interventions and strategies to improve health through the management of circadian (re)adaptation have been explored in the field, and in both human and animal laboratory manipulations of shiftwork. As part of an initiative by the Working Time Society (WTS) and International Committee on Occupational Health (ICOH), this review summarises the literature on the management of circadian (re)adaption using bright light treatment. Recommendations to maximise circadian adaptation are summarised for practitioners based on a variety of shiftwork schedules. In slowly rotating night shift schedules bright light appears most suitable when used in connection with the first three night shifts. These interventions are improved when combined with orange glasses (to block blue-green light exposure) for the commute home. Non-shifting strategies involve a lower dosage of light at night and promoting natural daylight exposure during the day (also recommended for day shifts) in acordance with the phase and amplitude response curves to light in humans.
Address Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0019-8366 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30700675 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2208
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Author Tauc, M.J.; Fristrup, K.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Shaw, J.A.
Title Field demonstration of a wing-beat modulation lidar for the 3D mapping of flying insects Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication OSA Continuum Abbreviated Journal OSA Continuum
Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 332
Keywords Instrumentation; Animals
Abstract We describe a wing-beat modulation lidar system designed for the 3D mapping of flying insects in ecological or entomological studies. To better understand the signals from this instrument, we analyzed simulated signals to identify how they were affected by various imperfections, such as variations in the spacing and amplitude of each individual wing-beat reflection. In addition, a radiometric model was used to estimate signal-to-noise ratio to gain insight into the relationships between the optical system design and insect parameters (e.g., wing size, reflectivity, or diffusivity).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2578-7519 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2209
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Author Wallace, H. D.
Title Electric Lighting Policy in the Federal Government, 1880-2016 Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords History; Policy; Lighting
Abstract Federal policies have targeted electric lighting since the 1880s with varying success. This dissertation examines the history of those policies to understand policy makers’ intent and how their decisions affected the course of events. This qualitative study poses three research questions: How have changes in lamp efficacy affected policy development? How and why have federal policies targeted electric lighting? How have private sector actors adapted public policy to further their own goals? The analysis uses an interdisciplinary approach taking advantage of overlapping methodologies drawn from policy and political sciences, economics, and the history of technology. The concepts of path dependency, context, and actor networks are especially important. Adoption of electric lighting spurred the construction of complex and capital intensive infrastructures now considered indispensable, and lighting always consumed a significant fraction of US electric power. Engineers and scientists created many lamps over the decades, in part to meet a growing demand for energy efficient products. Invention and diffusion of those lamps occurred amid changing standards and definitions of efficiency, shifting relations between network actors, and the development of path dependencies that constrained efforts to affect change. Federal actors typically used lighting policy to conserve resources, promote national security, or to symbolically emphasize the onset of a national crisis. The study shows that after an initial introductory phase, lighting-specific policies developed during two distinct periods. The earlier period consisted of intermittent, crisis-driven federal interventions of mixed success. The later period featured a sustained engagement between public and private sectors wherein incremental adjustments achieved policy goals. A time of transition occurred between the two main periods during which technical, economic, and political contexts changed, while several core social values remained constant. In both early and later periods, private sector actors used policy opportunities to further commercial goals, a practice that public sector actors in the later period used to promote policy acceptance. Recently enacted energy standards removing ordinary incandescent lamps in favor of high efficiency lamps mark the end of the later period. Apparent success means that policy makers should reconsider how they use lighting to achieve future goals.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis
Publisher University of Maryland Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2210
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Author Zheng, Q.; Weng, Q.; Wang, K.
Title Developing a new cross-sensor calibration model for DMSP-OLS and Suomi-NPP VIIRS night-light imageries Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing
Volume 153 Issue Pages 36-47
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Night-time light (NTL) data provides a great opportunity to monitor human activities and settlements. Currently, global-scale NTL data are acquired by two satellite sensors, i.e., DMSP-OLS and VIIRS, but the data collected by the satellites are not compatible. To address this issue, we proposed a method for generating long-term and consistent NTL data. First, a logistic model was employed to estimate and smooth the missing DMSP-OLS data. Second, the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram technique was used to statistically examine the presence of seasonality of monthly VIIRS time series. The seasonal effect, noisy and unstable observations in VIIRS were eliminated by the BFAST time-series decomposition algorithm. Then, we proposed a residuals corrected geographically weighted regression model (GWRc) to generate DMSP-like VIIRS data. A consistent NTL time series from 1996 to 2017 was formed by combining the DMSP-OLS and synthetic DMSP-like VIIRS data. Our assessment shows that the proposed GWRc model outperformed existing methods (e.g., power function model), yielding a lower regression RMSE (6.36), a significantly improved pixel-level NTL intensity consistency (SNDI = 82.73, R2 = 0.986) and provided more coherent results when used for urban area extraction. The proposed method can be used to extend NTL time series, and in conjunction with the upcoming yearly VIIRS data and Black Marble daily VIIRS data, it is possible to support long-term NTL-based studies such as monitoring light pollution in ecosystems, and mapping human activities.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0924-2716 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2361
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Author Manriquez, P.H.; Jara, M.E.; Diaz, M.I.; Quijon, P.A.; Widdicombe, S.; Pulgar, J.; Manriquez, K.; Quintanilla-Ahumada, D.; Duarte, C.
Title Artificial light pollution influences behavioral and physiological traits in a keystone predator species, Concholepas concholepas Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 661 Issue Pages 543-552
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is an increasing global problem that, despite being widely recognized in terrestrial systems, has been studied much less in marine habitats. In this study we investigated the effect of ALAN on behavioral and physiological traits of Concholepas concholepas, an important keystone species of the south-eastern Pacific coast. We used juveniles collected in intertidal habitats that had not previously been exposed to ALAN. In the laboratory we exposed them to two treatments: darkness and white LED (Lighting Emitting Diodes) to test for the impacts of ALAN on prey-searching behavior, self-righting time and metabolism. In the field, the distribution of juveniles was observed during daylight-hours to determine whether C. concholepas preferred shaded or illuminated microhabitats. Moreover, we compared the abundance of juveniles collected during day- and night-time hours. The laboratory experiments demonstrated that juveniles of C. concholepas seek out and choose their prey more efficiently in darkened areas. White LED illuminated conditions increased righting times and metabolism. Field surveys indicated that, during daylight hours, juveniles were more abundant in shaded micro-habitats than in illuminated ones. However, during darkness hours, individuals were not seen to aggregate in any particular microhabitats. We conclude that the exposure to ALAN might disrupt important behavioral and physiological traits of small juveniles in this species which, as a mechanism to avoid visual predators, are mainly active at night. It follows that ALAN in coastal areas might modify the entire community structure of intertidal habitats by altering the behavior of this keystone species.
Address Departamento de Ecologia y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30682607 Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2213
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