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Author Zhang, X.; Yang, W.; Liang, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, S.
Title Intensity dependent disruptive effects of light at night on activation of the HPG axis of tree sparrows (Passer montanus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 249 Issue Pages 904-909
Keywords Animals; Birds; hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis; HPG axis; wild tree sparrow; Passer montanus; endocrine
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become increasingly recognized as a disruptor of the reproductive endocrine process and behavior of wild birds. However, there is no evidence that ALAN directly disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and no information on the effects of different ALAN intensities on birds. We experimentally tested whether ALAN affects reproductive endocrine activation in the HPG axis of birds, and whether this effect is related to the intensity of ALAN, in wild tree sparrows (Passer montanus). Forty-eight adult female birds were randomly assigned to four groups. They were first exposed to a short light photoperiod (8 h light and 16 h dark per day) for 20 days, then exposed to a long light photoperiod (16 h light and 8 h dark per day) to initiate the reproductive endocrine process. During these two kinds of photoperiod treatments, the four groups of birds were exposed to 0, 85, 150, and 300 lux light in the dark phase (night) respectively. The expression of the reproductive endocrine activation related TSH-β, Dio2 and GnRH-I gene was significantly higher in birds exposed to 85 lux light at night, and significantly lower in birds exposed to 150 and 300 lux, relative to the 0 lux control. The birds exposed to 85 lux had higher peak values of plasma LH and estradiol concentration and reached the peak earlier than birds exposed to 0, 150, or 300 lux did. The lower gene expression of birds exposed to 150 and 300 lux reduced their peak LH and estradiol values, but did not delay the timing of these peaks compared to the control group. These results reveal that low intensity ALAN accelerates the activation of the reproductive endocrine process in the HPG axis, whereas high intensity ALAN retards it.
Address College of Life and Environment Science, Minzu University of China, Beijing, 100081, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2281
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Author Mohamad, Y.; Haim, A.; Elsalam, Z.A.
Title Altered metabolic and hormonal responses in male rats exposed to acute bright light-at-night associated with global DNA hypo-methylation Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology
Volume 194 Issue Pages 107-118
Keywords Animals; mouse models
Abstract The association between light pollution and disruption of daily rhythms, metabolic and hormonal disorders, as well as cancer progression is well-recognized. These adverse effects could be due to nocturnal melatonin suppression. The signaling pathway by which light pollution affects metabolism and endocrine responses is unclear. We studied the effects of artificial light at night (ALAN1) on body mass, food and water intake, daily rhythms of body temperature, serum glucose and insulin in male rats. Daily rhythms of urine production and urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-SMT2), as well as global DNA methylation in pancreas and liver tissues were also assessed. Mass gain was higher in ALAN rats compared with controls. Food intake, water consumption, glucose, insulin, and 6-SMT levels markedly lessened in response to ALAN. Conversely, urine production and body temperature were elevated in ALAN rats compared with controls. Significant 24-h rhythms were detected for all variables that were altered in mesor, amplitude, and acrophase occurrences under ALAN conditions. DNA hypo-methylation was detected in ALAN pancreatic tissue compared with controls, but not in hepatic tissue. Overall, ALAN affects metabolic and hormonal physiology in different levels in which flexible crosstalk between melatonin and both epigenetics and metabolic levels expressed as body temperature rhythm, is suggested to mediate the environmental exposure at the molecular level and subsequently physiology is altered. The flexibility of epigenetic modifications provides a potential therapeutic target for rectifying ALAN adverse effects by epigenetic markers such as melatonin and behavioral lifestyle interventions for confining ALAN exposures as much as possible.
Address Department of Human Biology, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa 3498838, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-1344 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2282
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Author Rodríguez, A.; Arcos, J.M.; Bretagnolle, V.; Dias, M.P.; Holmes, N.D.; Louzao, M.; Provencher, J.; Raine, A.F.; Ramírez, F.; Rodríguez, B.; Ronconi, R.A.; Taylor, R.S.; Bonnaud, E.; Borrelle, S.B.; Cortés, V.; Descamps, S.; Friesen, V.L.; Genovart, M.; Hedd, A.; Hodum, P.; Humphries, G.R.W.; Le Corre, M.; Lebarbenchon, C.; Martin, R.; Melvin, E.F.; Montevecchi, W.A.; Pinet, P.; Pollet, I.L.; Ramos, R.; Russell, J.C.; Ryan, P.G.; Sanz-Aguilar, A.; Spatz, D.R.; Travers, M.; Votier, S.C.; Wanless, R.M.; Woehler, E.; Chiaradia, A.
Title Future Directions in Conservation Research on Petrels and Shearwaters Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 6 Issue Pages 94
Keywords Animals; Birds; Seabirds; Petrels; Shearwaters; Review
Abstract Shearwaters and petrels (hereafter petrels) are highly adapted seabirds that occur across all the world’s oceans. Petrels are a threatened seabird group comprising 124 species. They have bet-hedging life histories typified by extended chick rearing periods, low fecundity, high adult survival, strong philopatry, monogamy and long-term mate fidelity and are thus vulnerable to change. Anthropogenic alterations on land and at sea have led to a poor conservation status of many petrels with 52 (42%) threatened species based on IUCN criteria and 65 (52%) suffering population declines. Some species are well-studied, even being used as bioindicators of ocean health, yet for others there are major knowledge gaps regarding their breeding grounds, migratory areas or other key aspects of their biology and ecology. We assembled 38 petrel conservation researchers to summarize information regarding the most important threats according to the IUCN Red List of threatened species to identify knowledge gaps that must be filled to improve conservation and management of petrels. We highlight research advances on the main threats for petrels (invasive species at breeding grounds, bycatch, overfishing, light pollution, climate change, and pollution). We propose an ambitious goal to reverse at least some of these six main threats, through active efforts such as restoring island habitats (e.g., invasive species removal, control and prevention), improving policies and regulations at global and regional levels, and engaging local communities in conservation efforts.
Address Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD) Seville, Spain
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2283
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Author Kim, K.‐N.; Sin, U.‐C.; Jo, Y.‐C.; Huang, Z.‐J.; Hassan, A.; Huang, Q.‐Y.; Lei, C.‐L.
Title Influence of green light at night on Juvenile hormone in the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Physiological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Entomol.
Volume 44 Issue 3-4 Pages 245-251
Keywords Animals; armyworm; Mythimna separata; Insects; Asia; green light
Abstract The oriental armyworm Mythimna separata is an agricultural insect pest in Eastern Asia. Mythimna separata moths have a high phototactic response to green (520 nm) light. The biological characteristics of insects living under light of a specific wavelength at night can change and, accordingly, Juvenile hormone (JH) levels may be influenced by this light. The present study evaluates changes in the total JH levels at different developmental stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of M. separata reared under green light with different exposure periods at night (or dark period). The results show that, when the exposure time per day of the green light at night is extended, the JH levels in the final‐instar larvae (22 days) and older age pupae (8 days) are significantly reduced, and the JH levels in earlier age pupae (4 days) and adults (3, 6 and 9 days) are significantly increased, compared with groups not exposed to green light. Additionally, the JH level of male moths significantly differs from that of the female moths. We suggest that the JH level of M. separata insects could be regulated by the green light at night (or dark period). The findings of the present study will help to explain the relationship between the light environment and biological characteristics in nocturnal moths.
Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China; ioir(at)mail.hzau.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-6962 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2596
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Author Horton, K.G.; Nilsson, C.; Van Doren, B.M.; La Sorte, F.A.; Dokter, A.M.; Farnsworth, A.
Title Bright lights in the big cities: migratory birds’ exposure to artificial light Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Front Ecol Environ
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 209-214
Keywords Animals; Birds; migratory birds
Abstract Many species of migratory birds have evolved the ability to migrate at night, and the recent and rapid expansion of artificial light at night has markedly altered the nighttime sky through which they travel. Migrating birds regularly pass through heavily illuminated landscapes, and bright lights affect avian orientation. But risks to migrating birds from artificial light are not spatially or temporally uniform, representing a challenge for mitigating potential hazards and developing action plans to catalog risks at continental scales. We leveraged over two decades of remote‐sensing data collected by weather surveillance radar and satellite‐based sensors to identify locations and times of year when the highest numbers of migrating birds are exposed to light pollution in the contiguous US. Our continental‐scale quantification of light exposure provides a novel opportunity for dynamic and targeted conservation strategies to address the hazards posed by light pollution to nocturnally migrating birds.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2285
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