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Author Gardner, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The use and misuse of coloured light in the urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Optics & Laser Technology Abbreviated Journal Optics & Laser Technology  
  Volume 38 Issue 4-6 Pages 366-376  
  Keywords Planning; Society; Psychology  
  Abstract The last few years have seen a huge increase in the transfer of coloured architectural lighting, derived from entertainment and theatre, into the urban and exterior environment. Part of the reason for this is that in the last 15 yr or so, there have been a number of important introductions in coloured lighting technology. These have transformed lighting practice, and while their widespread introduction is seen by some as an enrichment of the urban fabric, others see it as presenting considerable dangers, in terms of aesthetics, perception and in terms of civic identity. Its negative effects on the urban environment have been termed ‘colour blight’.

In this paper, the range of coloured lighting technologies is surveyed and other causes for the increase in coloured lighting are also discussed, together with the problems and benefits involved. Finally, some tentative means are put forward for resolving the problems caused by ‘colour blight’. Current good practice is illustrated by the author's own experience, including his consultancy's participation in a number of urban lighting strategies in the UK and elsewhere. This work involves implementation of a comprehensive lighting plan for the historic city of York, as part of the Urban Lighting Group consortium of three lighting design practices.
 
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  ISSN 0030-3992 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2183  
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Author Barghini, A.; de Medeiros, B.A.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial lighting as a vector attractant and cause of disease diffusion Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 118 Issue 11 Pages 1503-1506  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Traditionally, epidemiologists have considered electrification to be a positive factor. In fact, electrification and plumbing are typical initiatives that represent the integration of an isolated population into modern society, ensuring the control of pathogens and promoting public health. Nonetheless, electrification is always accompanied by night lighting that attracts insect vectors and changes people's behavior. Although this may lead to new modes of infection and increased transmission of insect-borne diseases, epidemiologists rarely consider the role of night lighting in their surveys. OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the epidemiological evidence concerning the role of lighting in the spread of vector-borne diseases to encourage other researchers to consider it in future studies. DISCUSSION: We present three infectious vector-borne diseases-Chagas, leishmaniasis, and malaria-and discuss evidence that suggests that the use of artificial lighting results in behavioral changes among human populations and changes in the prevalence of vector species and in the modes of transmission. CONCLUSION: Despite a surprising lack of studies, existing evidence supports our hypothesis that artificial lighting leads to a higher risk of infection from vector-borne diseases. We believe that this is related not only to the simple attraction of traditional vectors to light sources but also to changes in the behavior of both humans and insects that result in new modes of disease transmission. Considering the ongoing expansion of night lighting in developing countries, additional research on this subject is urgently needed.  
  Address Laboratorio de Estudos Evolutivos Humanos, Departamento de Genetica e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brasil. barghini@iee.usp.br  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20675268; PMCID:PMC2974685 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2184  
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Author Caorsi, V.; Sprau, P.; Zollinger, S.A.; Brumm, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal resting behaviour in urban great tits and its relation to anthropogenic disturbance and microclimate Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 73 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The ecological novelty of urbanisation poses many challenges to animals. We investigated whether anthropogenic disturbance (artificial light at night and noise) and abiotic factors in cities (temperature and humidity) predict nocturnal activity and rest in free-living urban great tits (Parus major). Our study is the first to relate nocturnal rest in wild birds to levels of noise pollution during the night, an issue that has been shown to be particularly damaging to human health. Unlike previous work on nocturnal behaviour of urban birds, we considered the combined effect of anthropogenic disturbance and urban microclimate to acknowledge that the umwelt of an animal is composed of multiple environmental variables. Using infrared cameras, we observed the nocturnal resting behaviour as a proxy for sleep in 17 birds in nest boxes deployed across the city of Munich, Germany. Although we found marked differences in resting behaviour between individuals, this variation was not related to the measured environmental factors. This finding contrasts earlier studies that reported nocturnal resting behaviour of birds to vary with temperature and light exposure. Although we did not find evidence that urban environmental factors disrupt resting behaviour in great tits, their sleep might still be impaired by the anthropogenic disturbances. To elucidate this issue, further studies are necessary that, for instance, measure brain activity.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2185  
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Author Prayag, A.S.; Najjar, R.P.; Gronfier, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin suppression is exquisitely sensitive to light and primarily driven by melanopsin in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 66 Issue 4 Pages e12562  
  Keywords Human Health; melatonin suppression; melanopic illuminance  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Light elicits a range of non-visual responses in humans. Driven predominantly by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), but also by rods and/or cones, these responses include melatonin suppression. A sigmoidal relationship has been established between melatonin suppression and light intensity, however photoreceptoral involvement remains unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, we first modelled the relationships between alpha-opic illuminances and melatonin suppression using an extensive dataset by Brainard and colleagues. Our results show that 1) melatonin suppression is better predicted by melanopic illuminance compared to other alpha-opic illuminances, 2) melatonin suppression is predicted to occur at levels as low as ~1.5 melanopic lux (melanopsin-weighted irradiance 0.2 muW/cm(2)), 3) saturation occurs at 305 melanopic lux (melanopsin-weighted irradiance 36.6 muW/cm(2)). We then tested this melanopsin-weighted illuminance response model derived from Brainard and colleagues' data and show that it predicts equally well melatonin suppression data from our laboratory, although obtained using different intensities and exposure duration. DISCUSSION: Together, our findings suggest that melatonin suppression by monochromatic lights is predominantly driven by melanopsin, and that it can be initiated at extremely low melanopic lux levels in experimental conditions. This emphasizes the concern of the non-visual impacts of low light intensities in lighting design and light-emitting devices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Integrative Physiology of the Brain Arousal Systems, Waking team, Inserm UMRS 1028, CNRS UMR 5292, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, F-69000, Lyon, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30697806 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2186  
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Author Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Aubé, M.; Zamorano, J.; Cardiel, N.; Tapia, C.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Colour remote sensing of the impact of artificial light at night (I): The potential of the International Space Station and other DSLR-based platforms Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 224 Issue Pages 92-103  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Sensors on remote sensing satellites have provided useful tools for evaluation of the environmental impacts of nighttime artificial light pollution. However, due to their panchromatic nature, the data available from these sensors (VIIRS/DNB and DMSP/OLS) has a limited capacity accurately to assess this impact. Moreover, in some cases, recorded variations can be misleading. Until new satellite platforms and sensors are available, only nighttime images taken with DSLR cameras from the International Space Station (ISS), airplanes, balloons or other such platforms can provide the required information. Here we describe a theoretical approach using colour-colour diagrams to analyse images taken by astronauts on the ISS to estimate spatial and temporal variation in the spectrum of artificial lighting emissions. We then evaluate how this information can be used to determine effects on some key environmental indices: photopic vision, the Melatonin Suppression Index, the Star Light Index, the Induced Photosynthesis Index, production of NO2-NO radicals, energy efficiency and CO2 emissions, and Correlated Colour Temperature. Finally, we use the city of Milan as a worked example of the approach.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2189  
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