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Author Riveros, J.L.; Correa, L.M.; Schuler, G.
Title Daylight effect on melatonin secretion in adult female guanacos (Lama guanicoe) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Reproduction in Domestic Animals = Zuchthygiene Abbreviated Journal Reprod Domest Anim
Volume 52 Issue 6 Pages 1129-1132
Keywords Animals
Abstract The wild South American camelids developed a strategy of seasonal reproduction during spring and summer with singleton birth. The photoperiod is one of the factors that may modulate this seasonality where light would be translated into a hormonal signal. This study evaluated the influence of changes in daily light intensity on melatonin concentration in captive guanacos under a long-day photoperiod (16 hr light/8 hr dark; 33 '28'S). Mean melatonin concentration was 28.3 +/- 20.3 pg/ml, with a maximum of 52.14 +/- 17.19 pg/ml at 23:30 and minimum of 14.29 +/- 6.64 pg/ml at 08:30 (p < .001). There was a negative association between light intensity and melatonin concentration (r = -0.57; p < .001). The results indicate that guanacos respond to variation in daily environmental light with a hormonal response and point to a circannual rhythm as a function of the photoperiod.
Address Departamento de Ciencias Animales, Facultad de Agronomia e Ingenieria Forestal, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0936-6768 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition (down) Conference
Notes PMID:28731219 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1688
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Author Jechow, A.; Kolláth, Z.; Ribas, S.J.; Spoelstra, H.; Hölker, F.; Kyba, C.C.M.
Title Imaging and mapping the impact of clouds on skyglow with all-sky photometry Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages Article number 6741
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Artificial skyglow is constantly growing on a global scale, with potential ecological consequences ranging up to affecting biodiversity. To understand these consequences, worldwide mapping of skyglow for all weather conditions is urgently required. In particular, the amplification of skyglow by clouds needs to be studied, as clouds can extend the reach of skyglow into remote areas not affected by light pollution on clear nights. Here we use commercial digital single lens reflex cameras with fisheye lenses for all-sky photometry. We track the reach of skyglow from a peri-urban into a remote area on a clear and a partly cloudy night by performing transects from the Spanish town of Balaguer towards Montsec Astronomical Park. From one single all-sky image, we extract zenith luminance, horizontal and scalar illuminance. While zenith luminance reaches near-natural levels at 5&#8201;km distance from the town on the clear night, similar levels are only reached at 27&#8201;km on the partly cloudy night. Our results show the dramatic increase of the reach of skyglow even for moderate cloud coverage at this site. The powerful and easy-to-use method promises to be widely applicable for studies of ecological light pollution on a global scale also by non-specialists in photometry.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition (down) Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1691
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Author Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M.
Title Rigorous field experiments are essential to understand the genuine severity of light pollution and to identify possible solutions Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages 5024-5026
Keywords commentary; animals
Abstract Ouyang et al. (2017; hereafter O2017) claim to have offered evidence that light pollution affects the health of free-living great tits (Parus major). Since 2012, they illuminated forests with either white, green, red or no artificial light at night (ALAN; Figure 1). Individuals in the white light treatment showed an increase in nightly activity in March 2014, which was linked to changes in health and physiology from March to May 2014. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition (down) Conference
Notes PMID:28746741 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1695
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Author Rydell, J.; Eklöf, J.; Sánchez-Navarro, S.
Title Age of enlightenment: long-term effects of outdoor aesthetic lights on bats in churches Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.
Volume 4 Issue 8 Pages 161077
Keywords Animals
Abstract We surveyed 110 country churches in south-western Sweden for presence of brown long-eared bats Plecotus auritus in summer 2016 by visual inspection and/or evening emergence counts. Each church was also classified according to the presence and amount of aesthetic directional lights (flood-lights) aimed on its walls and tower from the outside. Sixty-one of the churches had previously been surveyed by one of us (J.R.) between 1980 and 1990, before lights were installed on Swedish churches, using the same methods. Churches with bat colonies had decreased significantly in frequency from 61% in 1980s to 38% by 2016. All abandoned churches had been fitted with flood-lights in the period between the two surveys. The loss of bat colonies from lit churches was highly significant and most obvious when lights were applied from all directions, leaving no dark corridor for the bats to leave and return to the roost. In contrast, in churches that were not lit, all of 13 bat colonies remained after 25+ years between the surveys. Lighting of churches and other historical buildings is a serious threat to the long-term survival and reproduction of light-averse bats such as Plecotus spp. and other slow-flying species. Bat roosts are strictly protected according to the EU Habitats Directive and the EUROBATS agreement. Lighting of buildings for aesthetic purposes is becoming a serious environmental issue, because important bat roosts are destroyed in large numbers, and the problem should be handled accordingly. As a start, installation of flood-lights on historical buildings should at least require an environmental impact assessment (EIA).
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition (down) Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1698
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Author White, A.J.; Weinberg, C.R.; Park, Y.-M.; D'Aloisio, A.A.; Vogtmann, E.; Nichols, H.B.; Sandler, D.P.
Title Sleep characteristics, light at night and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer
Volume 141 Issue 11 Pages 2204-2214
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Increasing numbers of women in the US are getting too little sleep. Inadequate sleep has been associated with impaired metabolic function and endocrine disruption. Sister Study cohort participants (n = 50,884), completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires on sleep patterns. Incident breast cancers estrogen receptor (ER) status of the tumor were ascertained from questionnaires and medical records. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Analyses of sleep characteristics reported at the first follow-up interview included only participants who were breast cancer-free at time of follow-up interview. Over approximately 7 years of follow-up, 2,736 breast cancer cases (invasive and ductal carcinoma in situ) were diagnosed. There was little evidence that usual sleep duration or other sleep characteristics were associated with breast cancer. However, relative to those with no difficulty sleeping, women who reported having difficulty sleeping >/= 4 nights a week were at an increased risk of overall (HR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.09-1.61) and postmenopausal breast cancer (HR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.24-1.85). Risk of ER+ invasive cancer was elevated for women who reported having a light or television on in the room while sleeping (HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.97-1.47) or who typically got less sleep than they needed to feel their best (HR = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.98-1.50). In our study, most sleep characteristics, including sleep duration, were not associated with an increased risk although higher risk was observed for some markers of inadequate or poor quality sleep.
Address Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition (down) Conference
Notes PMID:28791684 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1708
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