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Author Hänel, A.; Posch, T.; Ribas, S.J.; Aubé, M.; Duriscoe, D.; Jechow, A.; Kollath, Z.; Lolkema, D.E.; Moore, C.; Schmidt, N.; Spoelstra, H.; Wuchterl, G.; Kyba, C.C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measuring night sky brightness: methods and challenges Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 205 Issue Pages 278-290  
  Keywords skyglow  
  Abstract Measuring the brightness of the night sky has become an increasingly important topic in recent years, as artificial lights and their scattering by the Earthâ??s atmosphere continue spreading around the globe. Several instruments and techniques have been developed for this task. We give an overview of these, and discuss their strengths and limitations. The different quantities that can and should be derived when measuring the night sky brightness are discussed, as well as the procedures that have been and still need to be defined in this context. We conclude that in many situations, calibrated consumer digital cameras with fisheye lenses provide the best relation between ease-of-use and wealth of obtainable information on the night sky. While they do not obtain full spectral information, they are able to sample the complete sky in a period of minutes, with colour information in three bands. This is important, as given the current global changes in lamp spectra, changes in sky radiance observed only with single band devices may lead to incorrect conclusions regarding long term changes in sky brightness. The acquisition of all-sky information is desirable, as zenith-only information does not provide an adequate characterization of a site. Nevertheless, zenith-only single-band one-channel devices such as the â??Sky Quality Meterâ? continue to be a viable option for long-term studies of night sky brightness and for studies conducted from a moving platform. Accurate interpretation of such data requires some understanding of the colour composition of the sky light. We recommend supplementing long-term time series derived with such devices with periodic all-sky sampling by a calibrated camera system and calibrated luxmeters or luminance meters.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1731  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Villamizar, N.; García-Alcazar, A.; Sánchez-Vázquez, F. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of light spectrum and photoperiod on the growth, development and survival of European sea bass (Dicentrarchuslabrax) larvae Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 292 Issue 1-2 Pages 80-86  
  Keywords animals; fish; light spectrum; photoperiod  
  Abstract This study investigates how the characteristics (spectrum and photoperiod) of artificial light affect European sea bass eggs and larvae from &#8722; 1 to 40 days post-hatching. Fertilised eggs and larvae were reared under five different light treatments: 12L:12D red light (LDR; half-peak bandwidth = 641–718 nm), 12L:12D blue light (LDB; half-peak bandwidth = 435–500 nm), 12L:12D broad-spectrum white light (LDW; 367 < &#955; < 1057 nm), 24L:0D broad-spectrum white light (LL) and 0L:24D (DD). The results showed that total length at day post-hatching 40 was significantly larger in larvae reared under LDB (15.4 ± 0.6 mm) and LL (15.2 ± 0.6 mm) than in larvae reared under LDR (11.7 ± 0.7 mm). Overall wet weight was highest under LDB (21.6 ± 2.02 mgr) and lowest in LDR larvae (13.6 ± 1.48 mgr). Yolk sac and oil globule absorption occurred more slowly in LDR and DD larvae, while LDB larvae developed their fin, teeth and swim bladder significantly earlier than the rest of the groups. DD larvae were unable to capture food and mortality was 100% by day post-hatching 18, while LDR larvae did not feed on rotifers, but fed on Artemia from day post-hatching 16 onwards. The best survival was obtained with the LL treatment, although significantly more problems with swim bladder development and lower jaw malformations were also identified in this group. In summary, these results highlight the key role of the light spectrum and photoperiod for European sea bass larvae, the best performance being achieved under the light conditions that best approached those of their natural aquatic environment (LDB). These findings should be considered when designing rearing protocols for larvae in aquaculture.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1606  
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Author Nasar, J.L.; Bokharaei, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting modes and their effects on impressions of public squares Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Environmental Psychology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Psychology  
  Volume 49 Issue Pages 96-105  
  Keywords Psychology  
  Abstract Lighting may affect impressions of public places after dark. Prospect-refuge theory suggests that people would favor uniform, bright, or overhead lighting to the alternatives. The study had 363 (161 men, 202 women) adult participants. An on-line survey displayed color slides of two simulated squares, each repeated for all mixes of lighting modes (order randomized across participants). One square also varied the peripheral lighting tilt (down or out). For ratings, each participant was assigned at random to use one of twelve items for evaluation, excitement, restfulness, or behavioral intent. Because the scales had high inter-item reliability, we combined them into a composite preference scale. In agreement with P-R theory, uniform, bright, and overhead lighting received the higher scores. The peripheral lighting tilt (down or out) did not affect preference. Lighting designs might do well to offer unobstructed views of information ahead. Research could test on-site experience and different aspects of lighting.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0272-4944 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1612  
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Author Alamús, R.; Bará, S.; Corbera, J.; Escofet, J.; Palà , V.; Pipia, L.; Tardà, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ground-based hyperspectral analysis of the urban nightscape Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing  
  Volume 124 Issue Pages 16-26  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Airborne hyperspectral cameras provide the basic information to estimate the energy wasted skywards by outdoor lighting systems, as well as to locate and identify their sources. However, a complete characterization of the urban light pollution levels also requires evaluating these effects from the city dwellers standpoint, e.g. the energy waste associated to the excessive illuminance on walls and pavements, light trespass, or the luminance distributions causing potential glare, to mention but a few. On the other hand, the spectral irradiance at the entrance of the human eye is the primary input to evaluate the possible health effects associated with the exposure to artificial light at night, according to the more recent models available in the literature. In this work we demonstrate the possibility of using a hyperspectral imager (routinely used in airborne campaigns) to measure the ground-level spectral radiance of the urban nightscape and to retrieve several magnitudes of interest for light pollution studies. We also present the preliminary results from a field campaign carried out in the downtown of Barcelona.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0924-2716 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1613  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, J.G.-H.; MacGregor-Fors, I.; Yeh, P.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sunrise in the city: disentangling drivers of the avian dawn chorus onset in urban greenspaces Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol  
  Volume 48 Issue 7 Pages 955-964  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Urban systems are known to have a number of effects on avian diversity, density, and morphological and behavioral traits. However, no study to date has simultaneously examined the wide range of urban variables in relation to the avian dawn chorus, a complex behavioral phenomenon. Previous studies investigating adjustments of the dawn chorus onset in urban settings have mainly been confined to relationships with noise and light levels. In addition to noise and light levels, in this study we included other potentially related environmental characteristics describing vegetation structure, urban infrastructure, and human activity, all of which have been shown to be drivers of bird diversity in urban areas. We conducted dawn chorus surveys at 38 Los Angeles urban greenspaces and used a classification and regression tree analysis to identify specific urban scenarios that best explained timing differences in the dawn chorus onset. Our results show that light level was the most important determinant of the dawn chorus onset time, in which, counter-intuitively, bird communities in greenspaces with higher light levels had later onsets. In addition, noise was an important factor for the chorus onset in greenspaces with higher light levels. Although our results differ from those of previous studies, these findings highlight the importance of noise and light levels in explaining dawn chorus onset variation, indicating the need for further research in untangling this complex and ecologically important phenomenon.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1623  
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