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Author Rodriguez, A.; Holmes, N.D.; Ryan, P.G.; Wilson, K.-J.; Faulquier, L.; Murillo, Y.; Raine, A.F.; Penniman, J.; Neves, V.; Rodriguez, B.; Negro, J.J.; Chiaradia, A.; Dann, P.; Anderson, T.; Metzger, B.; Shirai, M.; Deppe, L.; Wheeler, J.; Hodum, P.; Gouveia, C.; Carmo, V.; Carreira, G.P.; Delgado-Alburqueque, L.; Guerra-Correa, C.; Couzi, F.-X.; Travers, M.; Le Corre, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A global review of seabird mortality caused by land-based artificial lights Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol  
  Volume 31 Issue 5 Pages 986-1001  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial lights at night cause high mortality of seabirds, one of the most endangered groups of birds globally. Fledglings of burrow-nesting seabirds, and to a lesser extent adults, are grounded by lights when they fly at night. We review the current state of knowledge of light attraction, identify information gaps and propose measures to address the problem. Although other avian families such as Alcidae and Anatidae can be involved, the most affected seabirds are petrels and shearwaters: at least 56 species, more than one-third of them (24) threatened, are grounded by lights. Grounded seabirds have been found worldwide, mainly on oceanic islands but also at some continental locations. Petrel breeding grounds confined to formerly uninhabited islands are particularly at risk from ever-growing levels of light pollution due to tourism and urban sprawl. Where it is impractical to ban external lights, rescue programs of grounded birds offer the most immediate and extended mitigation measures to reduce light-induced mortality, saving thousands of birds every year. These programs also provide useful information for seabird management. However, the data typically are fragmentary and often strongly biased so the phenomenon is poorly understood, leading to inaccurate impact estimates. We identified as the most urgent priority actions: 1) estimation of mortality and impact on populations; 2) assessment of threshold light levels and safe distances from light sources; 3) documenting the fate of rescued birds; 4) improvement of rescue campaigns, particularly in terms of increasing recovery rates and level of care; and 5) research on seabird-friendly lights to reduce attraction. More research is necessary to improve our understanding of this human-wildlife conflict and to design effective management and mitigation measures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address UMR ENTROPIE, Universite de la Reunion 15, avenue Rene Cassin – CS 92003 97744 Saint Denis Cedex 9, La Reunion, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes PMID:28151557 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1632  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stothard, E.R.; McHill, A.W.; Depner, C.M.; Birks, B.R.; Moehlman, T.M.; Ritchie, H.K.; Guzzetti, J.R.; Chinoy, E.D.; LeBourgeois, M.K.; Axelsson, J.; Wright, K.P.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian Entrainment to the Natural Light-Dark Cycle across Seasons and the Weekend Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 508-513  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Reduced exposure to daytime sunlight and increased exposure to electrical lighting at night leads to late circadian and sleep timing [1-3]. We have previously shown that exposure to a natural summer 14 hr 40 min:9 hr 20 min light-dark cycle entrains the human circadian clock to solar time, such that the internal biological night begins near sunset and ends near sunrise [1]. Here we show that the beginning of the biological night and sleep occur earlier after a week's exposure to a natural winter 9 hr 20 min:14 hr 40 min light-dark cycle as compared to the modern electrical lighting environment. Further, we find that the human circadian clock is sensitive to seasonal changes in the natural light-dark cycle, showing an expansion of the biological night in winter compared to summer, akin to that seen in non-humans [4-8]. We also show that circadian and sleep timing occur earlier after spending a weekend camping in a summer 14 hr 39 min:9 hr 21 min natural light-dark cycle compared to a typical weekend in the modern environment. Weekend exposure to natural light was sufficient to achieve approximately 69% of the shift in circadian timing we previously reported after a week's exposure to natural light [1]. These findings provide evidence that the human circadian clock adapts to seasonal changes in the natural light-dark cycle and is timed later in the modern environment in both winter and summer. Further, we demonstrate that earlier circadian timing can be rapidly achieved through natural light exposure during a weekend spent camping.  
  Address Department of Integrative Physiology, Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0354, USA. Electronic address: kenneth.wright@colorado.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes PMID:28162893 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1633  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Davies, T.W.; Bennie, J.; Cruse, D.; Blumgart, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Multiple night-time light-emitting diode lighting strategies impact grassland invertebrate assemblages Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 7 Pages 2641-2648  
  Keywords Ecology; grasslands; LED  
  Abstract White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are rapidly replacing conventional outdoor lighting technologies around the world. Despite rising concerns over their impact on the environment and human health, the flexibility of LEDs has been advocated as a means of mitigating the ecological impacts of globally widespread outdoor night-time lighting through spectral manipulation, dimming and switching lights off during periods of low demand. We conducted a three-year field experiment in which each of these lighting strategies was simulated in a previously artificial light naive grassland ecosystem. White LEDs both increased the total abundance and changed the assemblage composition of adult spiders and beetles. Dimming LEDs by 50% or manipulating their spectra to reduce ecologically damaging wavelengths partially reduced the number of commoner species affected from seven to four. A combination of dimming by 50% and switching lights off between midnight and 04:00 am showed the most promise for reducing the ecological costs of LEDs, but the abundances of two otherwise common species were still affected. The environmental consequences of using alternative lighting technologies are increasingly well established. These results suggest that while management strategies using LEDs can be an effective means of reducing the number of taxa affected, averting the ecological impacts of night-time lighting may ultimately require avoiding its use altogether.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes PMID:28139040 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1634  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Persons, W.E.; Eason, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human activity and habitat type affect perceived predation risk in urban white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology  
  Volume 123 Issue 5 Pages 348-356  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Predation risk is one of the largest costs associated with foraging in small mammals. Small mammals select microhabitat features such as tree and shrub canopy cover, woody debris and vegetative ground cover that can lower the risk of detection from predators and provide greater protection if discovered. Small mammals also increase foraging activity and decrease selection for cover when cloud cover increases and moon illumination is less. Often researchers assume small mammals in urban areas respond to these cues in the same manner as in natural areas, but these cues themselves are altered in urban zones. In this study, we investigated how Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) and coarse woody debris (CWD) affected giving-up density (GUD) in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). Each of three habitat treatments (open flood channel, the edge and interior of the honeysuckle patch) contained cover treatments with coarse woody debris present or absent. The six treatment combinations were compared to environmental variables (temperature, humidity and illumination) and habitat variables to test their effect on GUD. Peromyscus leucopus foraged to lower densities in areas with CWD present and also under the honeysuckle canopy, using this invasive shrub to decrease predation risk, potentially increasing survivability within this urban park. Increased human presence negatively affected foraging behavior across treatments. Human presence and light pollution significantly influenced P. leucopus, modifying their foraging behavior and demonstrating that both fine- and coarse-scale urban factors can affect small mammals. Foraging increased as humidity increased, particularly under the honeysuckle canopy. Changes in illumination due to moonlight and cloud cover did not affect foraging behavior, suggesting urban light pollution may have altered behavioral responses to changes in light levels. Lonicera maackii seemed to facilitate foraging in P. leucopus, even though it adversely affects the plant community, suggesting that its impact may not be entirely negative.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1642  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, C.; Li, G.; Zhu, Y.; Ge, Y.; Kung, H.-te; Wu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A likelihood-based spatial statistical transformation model (LBSSTM) of regional economic development using DMSP/OLS time series and nighttime light imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Spatial Statistics Abbreviated Journal Spatial Statistics  
  Volume 21 Issue B Pages 421-439  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In a regional economy, the central city of a metropolitan area has a radiative effect and an accumulative effect on its surrounding cities. Considering the limitations of traditional data sources (e.g., its subjectivity) and the advantages of nighttime light data, including its objectivity, availability and cyclicity, this paper proposes a likelihood spatial statistical transformation model (LBSSTM) to invert for the gross domestic product (GDP) of the surrounding cities, using time series of Sum of Lights (SOL) data covering the central city and taking advantage of the economic and spatial association between the central city and the surrounding cities within a metropolitan area and the correlation between SOL and GDP. The Wuhan Metropolitan Area is chosen to verify the model using time series analysis and exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA). The experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed LBSSTM. The prediction accuracy of our model is verified by cross-validation using data from 1998, 2004 and 2011, based on the 3σ rule. This model can quantitatively express the agglomeration and diffusion effect of the central city and reveal the spatial pattern of this effect. The results of this work are potentially useful in making spatio-temporal economic projections and filling in missing data from some regions, as well as gaining a deeper quantitative and spatio-temporal understanding of the laws underlying regional economic development.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2211-6753 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1644  
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