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Author Mishra, I.; Knerr, R.M.; Stewart, A.A.; Payette, W.I.; Richter, M.M.; Ashley, N.T.
Title Light at night disrupts diel patterns of cytokine gene expression and endocrine profiles in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages (down) 15833
Keywords Animals
Abstract Increased exposure to light pollution perturbs physiological processes through misalignment of daily rhythms at the cellular and tissue levels. Effects of artificial light-at-night (ALAN) on diel properties of immunity are currently unknown. We therefore tested the effects of ALAN on diel patterns of cytokine gene expression, as well as key hormones involved with the regulation of immunity, in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Circulating melatonin and corticosterone, and mRNA expression levels of pro- (IL-1beta, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines were measured at six time points across 24-h day in brain (nidopallium, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) and peripheral tissues (liver, spleen, and fat) of zebra finches exposed to 12 h light:12 h darkness (LD), dim light-at-night (DLAN) or constant bright light (LLbright). Melatonin and corticosterone concentrations were significantly rhythmic under LD, but not under LLbright and DLAN. Genes coding for cytokines showed tissue-specific diurnal rhythms under LD and were lost with exposure to LLbright, except IL-6 in hypothalamus and liver. In comparison to LLbright, effects of DLAN were less adverse with persistence of some diurnal rhythms, albeit with significant waveform alterations. These results underscore the circadian regulation of biosynthesis of immune effectors and imply the susceptibility of daily immune and endocrine patterns to ALAN.
Address Department of Biology, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA. noah.ashley@wku.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31676761; PMCID:PMC6825233 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2766
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Author Quinn, D.; Kress, D.; Chang, E.; Stein, A.; Wegrzynski, M.; Lentink, D.
Title How lovebirds maneuver through lateral gusts with minimal visual information Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 116 Issue 30 Pages (down) 15033-15041
Keywords Animals; bird; control; flight; gust; visual
Abstract Flying birds maneuver effectively through lateral gusts, even when gust speeds are as high as flight speeds. What information birds use to sense gusts and how they compensate is largely unknown. We found that lovebirds can maneuver through 45 degrees lateral gusts similarly well in forest-, lake-, and cave-like visual environments. Despite being diurnal and raised in captivity, the birds fly to their goal perch with only a dim point light source as a beacon, showing that they do not need optic flow or a visual horizon to maneuver. To accomplish this feat, lovebirds primarily yaw their bodies into the gust while fixating their head on the goal using neck angles of up to 30 degrees . Our corroborated model for proportional yaw reorientation and speed control shows how lovebirds can compensate for lateral gusts informed by muscle proprioceptive cues from neck twist. The neck muscles not only stabilize the lovebirds' visual and inertial head orientations by compensating low-frequency body maneuvers, but also attenuate faster 3D wingbeat-induced perturbations. This head stabilization enables the vestibular system to sense the direction of gravity. Apparently, the visual horizon can be replaced by a gravitational horizon to inform the observed horizontal gust compensation maneuvers in the dark. Our scaling analysis shows how this minimal sensorimotor solution scales favorably for bigger birds, offering local wind angle feedback within a wingbeat. The way lovebirds glean wind orientation may thus inform minimal control algorithms that enable aerial robots to maneuver in similar windy and dark environments.
Address Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305; danquinn@virginia.edu dlentink@stanford.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31289235 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2577
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Author Rea, M.S.; Nagare, R.; Figueiro, M.G.
Title Predictions of melatonin suppression during the early biological night and their implications for residential light exposures prior to sleeping Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages (down) 14114
Keywords Human Health
Abstract The magnitude of nocturnal melatonin suppression depends upon the spectrum, amount, and duration of light exposure. The functional relationship between melatonin suppression and the light spectrum and amount have been previously described. Only one duration-dependent parameter was needed to extend this functional relationship to predict nocturnal melatonin suppression during the early biological night from a variety of published studies. Those predictions suggest that ambient lighting commonly found in North American homes will not suppress melatonin for durations up to 3 h, whereas extended use of self-luminous displays in the home prior to sleep can.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY, 12180-3352, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32839489; PMCID:PMC7445277 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3098
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Author Yao, Q.; Wang, H.; Dai, Q.; Shi, F.
Title Quantification assessment of light pollution of façade lighting display in Shenzhen, China Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Optics Express Abbreviated Journal Opt. Express
Volume 28 Issue 9 Pages (down) 14100
Keywords Lighting; Instrumentation
Abstract In this work, we investigated 39 façade lighting displays, all of which consisted of tri-chromatic light sources, namely blue-, green-, and red- light units, in Shenzhen, China. We extracted the spectral characteristics of the mean peak wavelength/full-width at half-maximum,and proposed universal spectral models. We further established the ‘chromaticity-performance’ relation to quantitatively assess the impact of light pollution on typical species based on corresponding action spectra. The findings provide a low-cost, fast and precise approach to assess light pollution of complicated light environment, and may help reduce energy waste and adverse environmental consequences associated with light pollution.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1094-4087 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2893
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Author Secondi, J.; Davranche, A.; Théry, M.; Mondy, N.; Lengagne, T.; Isaac, N.
Title Assessing the effects of artificial light at night on biodiversity across latitude – Current knowledge gaps Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Abbreviated Journal Global Ecol Biogeogr
Volume in press Issue Pages (down) geb.13037
Keywords Ecology; biodiversity; Review
Abstract Aim

Exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) is a risk factor for organisms. Considering the spread and increasing intensity of night brightness across the globe, and the key role of light at all biological levels, alterations of ecosystems are expected. Yet, we cannot predict the severity of the effects of ALAN in several biomes because little information is available outside the temperate zone. We reviewed current knowledge and identified traits that could be targeted to fill this knowledge gap in order to contribute to the elaboration of a biogeographical framework for the study of ALAN at the global scale.

Location

Global.

Time period

Current and next decades.

Methods

We analysed the latitudinal variation in ALAN and focused on environmental factors that vary with latitude but that have been overlooked. We reviewed biological traits that exhibit latitudinal variation and depend on light and photoperiod and compiled information about the predicted changes in human demography and road networks across different world regions.

Results

Cloud cover amplifies ALAN far away from urbanized areas. Because of the higher frequency of overcast sky nights, exposure effects may be stronger both at high latitudes and across a large fraction of the intertropical zone, although at different times of the year. Intertropical biomes host the largest fraction of global biodiversity. Although currently they are not the most exposed to ALAN, their human populations are growing, and urbanized areas and road networks are expanding. Hence, ALAN could have strong ecological consequences, with cloud cover as an aggravating factor.

Perspectives

Knowledge gaps currently limit our ability to predict the effects of ALAN in different biomes. Therefore, it will be important to start investigating the consequences of this novel environmental factor across the globe, in order to develop a relevant theoretical framework.
Address
Corporate Author Wiley Thesis
Publisher English Place of Publication English Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1466-822X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2758
Permanent link to this record