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Author Miller, S.D.; Straka III, W.C.; Yue, J.; Seaman, C.J.; Xu, S.; Elvidge, C.D.; Hoffmann, L.; Azeem, I.
Title The Dark Side of Hurricane Matthew: Unique Perspectives from the VIIRS Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.
Volume 99 Issue 12 Pages (down) 2561-2574
Keywords remote sensing
Abstract Hurricane Matthew (28 Sep – 9 October 2016) was perhaps the most infamous storm of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, claiming over 600 lives and causing over $15 billion USD in damages across the central Caribbean and southeastern U.S. seaboard. Research surrounding Matthew and its many noteworthy meteorological characteristics (e.g., rapid intensification into the southernmost Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin on record, strong lightning and sprite production, and unusual cloud morphology) is ongoing. Satellite remote sensing typically plays an important role in the forecasting and study of hurricanes, providing a top-down perspective on storms developing over the remote and inherently data sparse tropical oceans. In this regard, a relative newcomer among the suite of satellite observations useful for tropical cyclone monitoring and research is the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB), a sensor flying onboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. Unlike conventional instruments, the DNB's sensitivity to extremely low levels of visible/near-infrared light offers new insight on storm properties and impacts. Here, we chronicle Matthew’s path of destruction and peer through the DNB’s looking glass of low-light visible observations, including lightning connected to sprite formation, modulation of the atmospheric nightglow by storm-generated gravity waves, and widespread power outages. Collected without moonlight, these examples showcase the wealth of unique information present in DNB nocturnal low-light observations without moonlight, and their potential to complement traditional satellite measurements of tropical storms worldwide.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1959
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Author Schroer, S.; Huggins, B.J.; Azam, C.; Hölker, F.
Title Working with Inadequate Tools: Legislative Shortcomings in Protection against Ecological Effects of Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages (down) 2551
Keywords Conservation; Animals; Society; Law
Abstract The fundamental change in nocturnal landscapes due to the increasing use of artificial light at night (ALAN) is recognized as being detrimental to the environment and raises important regulatory questions as to whether and how it should be regulated based on the manifold risks to the environment. Here, we present the results of an analysis of the current legal obligations on ALAN in context with a systematic review of adverse effects. The legal analysis includes the relevant aspects of European and German environmental law, specifically nature conservation and immission control. The review represents the results of 303 studies indicating significant disturbances of organisms and landscapes. We discuss the conditions for prohibitions by environmental laws and whether protection gaps persist and, hence, whether specific legislation for light pollution is necessary. While protection is predominantly provided for species with special protection status that reveal avoidance behavior of artificially lit landscapes and associated habitat loss, adverse effects on species and landscapes without special protection status are often unaddressed by existing regulations. Legislative shortcomings are caused by difficulties in proving adverse effect on the population level, detecting lighting malpractice, and applying the law to ALAN-related situations. Measures to reduce ALAN-induced environmental impacts are highlighted. We discuss whether an obligation to implement such measures is favorable for environmental protection and how regulations can be implemented.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2868
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Author Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Effects of street lighting technologies on the success and quality of pollination in a nocturnally pollinated plant Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages (down) e02550
Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly important driver of global change. Lighting directly affects plants, but few studies have investigated indirect effects mediated by interacting organisms. Nocturnal Lepidoptera are globally important pollinators, and pollen transport by moths is disrupted by lighting. Many street lighting systems are being replaced with novel, energy‐efficient lighting, with unknown ecological consequences. Using the wildflower Silene latifolia, we compared pollination success and quality at experimentally lit and unlit plots, testing two major changes to street lighting technology: in lamp type, from high‐pressure sodium lamps to light‐emitting diodes, and in lighting regime, from full‐night (FN) to part‐night (PN) lighting. We predicted that lighting would reduce pollination. S. latifolia was pollinated both diurnally and nocturnally. Contrary to our predictions, flowers under FN lighting had higher pollination success than flowers under either PN lighting or unlit controls, which did not significantly differ from each other. Lamp type, lighting regime, and distance from the light all significantly affected aspects of pollination quality. These results confirm that street lighting could affect plant reproduction through indirect effects mediated by nocturnal insects, and further highlight the possibility for novel lighting technologies to mitigate the effects of ALAN on ecosystems.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2174
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Author Pan, W.; Fu, H.; Zheng, P.
Title Regional Poverty and Inequality in the Xiamen-Zhangzhou-Quanzhou City Cluster in China Based on NPP/VIIRS Night-Time Light Imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages (down) 2547
Keywords Remote sensing
Abstract Poverty and inequality remain outstanding challenges in many global regions. Understanding the underlying social and economic conditions is important in formulating poverty eradication strategies. Using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Night-Time Light (NTL) images and multidimensional socioeconomic data between 2012 and 2018, this study measured regional poverty and inequality in the Xiamen-Zhangzhou-Quanzhou city cluster in the People’s Republic of China. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and the Theil index decomposition method were used to establish an Integrated Poverty Index (IPI) and a regional inequality index, respectively. The results indicated that: (1) The poverty index is affected by the geographical location, policies, and resources of a district/county. A significant logarithmic correlation model between VIIRS Average Light Index (ALI) and IPI was established. (2) The Theil index derived from Gross Domestic Product (GDP) indicators showed that overall inequality and between-prefecture inequality declined, while within-prefecture inequality remained unchanged. In terms of the contributions to regional inequality, the contribution of within-prefecture inequality is the largest. The results indicated that Suomi National Polar Partnership/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP/VIIRS) night-time data can help to perform district/county-level poverty assessments at small and medium spatial scales, although the evaluation effect on regional inequality is slightly lower.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2871
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Author Ma, X.; Li, C.; Tong, X.; Liu, S.
Title A New Fusion Approach for Extracting Urban Built-up Areas from Multisource Remotely Sensed Data Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 11 Issue 21 Pages (down) 2516
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Recent advances in the fusion technology of remotely sensed data have led to an increased availability of extracted urban information from multiple spatial resolutions and multi-temporal acquisitions. Despite the existing extraction methods, there remains the challenging task of fully exploiting the characteristics of multisource remote sensing data, each of which has its own advantages. In this paper, a new fusion approach for accurately extracting urban built-up areas based on the use of multisource remotely sensed data, i.e., the DMSP-OLS nighttime light data, the MODIS land cover product (MCD12Q1) and Landsat 7 ETM+ images, was proposed. The proposed method mainly consists of two components: (1) the multi-level data fusion, including the initial sample selection, unified pixel resolution and feature weighted calculation at the feature level, as well as pixel attribution determination at decision level; and (2) the optimized sample selection with multi-factor constraints, which indicates that an iterative optimization with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), the modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI), and the bare soil index (BSI), along with the sample training of the support vector machine (SVM) and the extraction of urban built-up areas, produces results with high credibility. Nine Chinese provincial capitals along the Silk Road Economic Belt, such as Chengdu, Chongqing, Kunming, Xining, and Nanning, were selected to test the proposed method with data from 2001 to 2010. Compared with the results obtained by the traditional threshold dichotomy and the improved neighborhood focal statistics (NFS) method, the following could be concluded. (1) The proposed approach achieved high accuracy and eliminated natural elements to a great extent while obtaining extraction results very consistent to those of the more precise improved NFS approach at a fine scale. The average overall accuracy (OA) and average Kappa values of the extracted urban built-up areas were 95% and 0.83, respectively. (2) The proposed method not only identified the characteristics of the urban built-up area from the nighttime light data and other daylight images at the feature level but also optimized the samples of the urban built-up area category at the decision level, making it possible to provide valuable information for urban planning, construction, and management with high accuracy.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2731
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