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Author Chen, Q.; Ru, T.; Zhai, D.; Huang, X.; Li, Y.; Qian, L.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Half a century of Lighting Research & Technology: A bibliometric review Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 1477153519857788  
  Keywords History; Lighting; Review  
  Abstract Lighting Research & Technology (LRT) is an influential journal in the field of light and lighting dating back to 1969. To celebrate its 50th birthday, the current study explored its bibliometric characteristics and mapped the bibliographic information graphically through VOSviewer software. This analysis found that the number of papers has steadily increased during recent years. The most productive and cited country was the United Kingdom. The most productive and cited institution was Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The most prolific author was Steve Fotios and the most cited author was Mark Rea. The journal most cited together with LRT was Leukos. LRT has become more and more international and interdisciplinary over the last five decades. Suggestions for the development of LRT are provided. Develpoments over the last 50 years have turned LRT into one of leading journals in the light and lighting field, one which has a bright future.  
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  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2573  
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Author Kim, K.-N.; Jo, Y.-C.; Huang, Z.-J.; Song, H.-S.; Ryu, K.-H.; Huang, Q.-Y.; Lei, C.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence of green light illumination at night on biological characteristics of the oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Bulletin of Entomological Research Abbreviated Journal Bull Entomol Res  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) S0007485319000397  
  Keywords Animals; Mythimna separata; biological characteristic; green light; longevity; reproduction  
  Abstract The oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata is an important crop pest in eastern Asia. Nocturnal insects, including nocturnal moths, have phototactic behavior to an artificial light source. Phototactic behavior in insects is species-specific in response to different wavelengths of light sources. Our previous study showed that green (520 nm) light emitting diode (LED) light resulted in a significantly higher phototactic behavior in M. separata moths compared to the other wavelength LED lights. The goal of the present study is to investigate the influence of green light illumination on biological characteristics of different developmental stages in M. separata. Our results revealed that when different developmental stages of M. separata were exposed to the green light illumination in a dark period, several biological characteristics in all developmental stages except for egg stage were positively changed, but those of F1 generation M. separata which are next generation of the adults exposed to the green light did not significantly change compared with the control level. These findings suggest that green light illumination at night (or dark period) has a positive effect on the development and longevity of M. separata.  
  Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University,Wuhan, Hubei,China  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-4853 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31203829 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2585  
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Author Li, X.; Duarte, F.; Ratti, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analyzing the obstruction effects of obstacles on light pollution caused by street lighting system in Cambridge, Massachusetts Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science Abbreviated Journal Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 2399808319861645  
  Keywords Skyglow; Lighting; upward light  
  Abstract Artificial light has transformed urban life, enhancing visibility, aesthetics, and increasing safety in public areas. However, too much unwanted artificial light leads to light pollution, which has a negative effect on public health and urban ecosystems, as well as on the aesthetic and cultural meanings of the night sky. Some of the factors interfering with the estimation of light pollution in cities are urban features, such as the presence of trees, road dimensions, and the physical characteristics of buildings. In this study, we proposed a simplified model for unwanted upward light coming from street luminaires based on a building height model and the publicly accessible Google Street View images. We simulated and analyzed the obstruction effects of different street features on the light pollution caused by the street lighting system in Cambridge, Massachusetts. By providing quantitative information about the connections between the streetscape features and the amount of unwanted upward artificial light, this study provides reference values to inform policies aimed at curbing light pollution.  
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  ISSN 2399-8083 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2587  
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Author Kernbach, M.E.; Newhouse, D.J.; Miller, J.M.; Hall, R.J.; Gibbons, J.; Oberstaller, J.; Selechnik, D.; Jiang, R.H.Y.; Unnasch, T.R.; Balakrishnan, C.N.; Martin, L.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution increases West Nile virus competence of a ubiquitous passerine reservoir species Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 286 Issue 1907 Pages (down) 20191051  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health; anthropogenic; ecoimmunology; host competence; light pollution; reservoir host  
  Abstract Among the many anthropogenic changes that impact humans and wildlife, one of the most pervasive but least understood is light pollution. Although detrimental physiological and behavioural effects resulting from exposure to light at night are widely appreciated, the impacts of light pollution on infectious disease risk have not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that artificial light at night (ALAN) extends the infectious-to-vector period of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), an urban-dwelling avian reservoir host of West Nile virus (WNV). Sparrows exposed to ALAN maintained transmissible viral titres for 2 days longer than controls but did not experience greater WNV-induced mortality during this window. Transcriptionally, ALAN altered the expression of gene regulatory networks including key hubs (OASL, PLBD1 and TRAP1) and effector genes known to affect WNV dissemination (SOCS). Despite mounting anti-viral immune responses earlier, transcriptomic signatures indicated that ALAN-exposed individuals probably experienced pathogen-induced damage and immunopathology, potentially due to evasion of immune effectors. A simple mathematical modelling exercise indicated that ALAN-induced increases of host infectious-to-vector period could increase WNV outbreak potential by approximately 41%. ALAN probably affects other host and vector traits relevant to transmission, and additional research is needed to advise the management of zoonotic diseases in light-polluted areas.  
  Address Center for Global Health Infectious Disease Research, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31337318; PMCID:PMC6661335 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2611  
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Author Wahl, S.; Engelhardt, M.; Schaupp, P.; Lappe, C.; Ivanov, I.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The inner clock – blue light sets the human rhythm Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Biophotonics Abbreviated Journal J Biophotonics  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages (down) e201900102  
  Keywords Human Health; blue light; circadian rhythm; melanopsin; melatonin; visible light  
  Abstract Visible light synchronizes the human biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus to the solar 24-hour cycle. Short wavelengths, perceived as blue color, are the strongest synchronizing agent for the circadian system that keeps most biological and psychological rhythms internally synchronized. Circadian rhythm is important for optimum function of organisms and circadian sleep-wake disruptions or chronic misalignment often may lead to psychiatric and neurodegenerative illness. The beneficial effect on circadian synchronization, sleep quality, mood, and cognitive performance depends not only on the light spectral composition but also on the timing of exposure and its intensity. Exposure to blue light during the day is important to suppress melatonin secretion, the hormone that is produced by the pineal gland and plays crucial role in circadian rhythm entrainment. While the exposure to blue is important for keeping organism's wellbeing, alertness, and cognitive performance during the day, chronic exposure to low-intensity blue light directly before bed-time, may have serious implications on sleep quality, circadian phase and cycle durations. This rises inevitably the need for solutions to improve wellbeing, alertness and cognitive performance in today's modern society where exposure to blue light emitting devices is ever increasing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Carl Zeiss Vision International GmbH, Aalen, Germany  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1864-063X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31433569 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2655  
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