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Author Bará, S.; Nievas, M.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Zamorano, J. url  openurl
  Title Zernike analysis of all-sky night brightness maps Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Applied Optics Abbreviated Journal Appl Opt  
  Volume 53 Issue 12 Pages (down) 2677-2686  
  Keywords modeling; light at night; light pollution; all-sky; Zernike polynomials; image decomposition; sky brightness  
  Abstract All-sky night brightness maps (calibrated images of the night sky with hemispherical field-of-view (FOV) taken at standard photometric bands) provide useful data to assess the light pollution levels at any ground site. We show that these maps can be efficiently described and analyzed using Zernike circle polynomials. The relevant image information can be compressed into a low-dimensional coefficients vector, giving an analytical expression for the sky brightness and alleviating the effects of noise. Moreover, the Zernike expansions allow us to quantify in a straightforward way the average and zenithal sky brightness and its variation across the FOV, providing a convenient framework to study the time course of these magnitudes. We apply this framework to analyze the results of a one-year campaign of night sky brightness measurements made at the UCM observatory in Madrid.  
  Address Área de Óptica, Dept. de Física Aplicada, Fac. de Física, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Optical Society of America Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-6935 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24787595 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 318  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Davies, T.W.; Bennie, J.; Cruse, D.; Blumgart, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Multiple night-time light-emitting diode lighting strategies impact grassland invertebrate assemblages Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 7 Pages (down) 2641-2648  
  Keywords Ecology; grasslands; LED  
  Abstract White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are rapidly replacing conventional outdoor lighting technologies around the world. Despite rising concerns over their impact on the environment and human health, the flexibility of LEDs has been advocated as a means of mitigating the ecological impacts of globally widespread outdoor night-time lighting through spectral manipulation, dimming and switching lights off during periods of low demand. We conducted a three-year field experiment in which each of these lighting strategies was simulated in a previously artificial light naive grassland ecosystem. White LEDs both increased the total abundance and changed the assemblage composition of adult spiders and beetles. Dimming LEDs by 50% or manipulating their spectra to reduce ecologically damaging wavelengths partially reduced the number of commoner species affected from seven to four. A combination of dimming by 50% and switching lights off between midnight and 04:00 am showed the most promise for reducing the ecological costs of LEDs, but the abundances of two otherwise common species were still affected. The environmental consequences of using alternative lighting technologies are increasingly well established. These results suggest that while management strategies using LEDs can be an effective means of reducing the number of taxa affected, averting the ecological impacts of night-time lighting may ultimately require avoiding its use altogether.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28139040 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1634  
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Author Singhal, R. K., Kumar, V., Kumar, M., & Bose, B. url  openurl
  Title Responses of different light intensities and continue light during dark period on rice (Oryza sativa L.) seed germination and seedling development Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages (down) 2602-2609  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Temperature, humidity and moisture content are the important abiotic component regulating seedling establishment in plants including rice. Light factor intensity and duration are also important environmental factors regulating rice growth and development. In the growth and development of rice crop germination followed by seedling establishment is the foremost and very important growth stages. Light component such as intensity, direction and duration are the regulating factor for several physiological, biochemical and molecular processes in plants. To consider these facts, in the present piece of work rice seed of HUR-105 grown under different light regimes, from T1 (2000 lux for 12 h during day time + 12 h dark period) (lower light intensity), T2 (4000 lux for 12 h during day time+ 12 h dark period), T3 (6000 lux for 12 h during day time + 12 h dark period) (moderate), T4 (9000 lux for 12 h during day time + 12 h dark period) (optimum) and to T5 (9000 lux for 12h during day time + 200 lux for 12 h during night time). Germination, seedling growth and biochemical parameters were observed at different time intervals. It was observed that germination %, germination index (GI), germination rate index (GRI), coefficient of velocity of germination (CVG), mean germination rate (MGR), seedling vigour (SV), α-amylase activity and soluble sugar content significantly reduced in both the treatments T1 and T5. Further, the mean time germination and insoluble sugar content were increased in T1 and T5 treatment. The present experiment concluded that both lower light intensity (T1) and addition of low light during dark period (considered as night light pollution) causes stress condition and reduce germination and seedling establishment potential of rice crop.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2738  
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Author Kuffer, M.; Pfeffer, K.; Sliuzas, R.; Taubenbock, H.; Baud, I.; van Maarseveen, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Capturing the Urban Divide in Nighttime Light Images From the International Space Station Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal IEEE J. Sel. Top. Appl. Earth Observations Remote Sensing  
  Volume 11 Issue 8 Pages (down) 2578-2586  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Earlier studies utilizing coarse resolution DMSP-OLS nighttime light (NTL) imagery suggest a negative correlation between the amount of NTL and urban deprivation. The International Space Station (ISS) NTL images offer higher resolution images compared to DMSP-OLS or VIIRS images, allowing an analysis of intraurban NTL variations. The aim of this study is to examine the capacity of ISS images for analyzing the intraurban divide. NTL images of four cities (one African, two Asian, and one South American) have been processed and analyzed. The results show that deprived areas are generally the darker spots of built-up areas within cities, illustrating the urban divide in terms of access to street lighting. However, differences exist between cities: Deprived areas in the African city (Dar es Salaam) generally feature lower NTL emissions compared to the examined cities in South America (Belo Horizonte) and Asia (Mumbai and Ahmedabad). Beyond, variations exist in NTL emissions across deprived areas within cities. Deprived areas at the periphery show less NTL compared to central areas. Edges of deprived areas have higher NTL emissions compared to internal areas. NTL emission differences between types of deprived areas were detected. The correlation between ISS NTL images and population densities is weak; this can be explained by densely built-up deprived areas having less NTL compared to lower density formal areas. Our findings show ISS data complement other data to capture the urban divide between deprived and better-off areas and the need to consider socioeconomic conditions in estimating populations.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1939-1404 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2178  
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Author Miller, S.D.; Straka III, W.C.; Yue, J.; Seaman, C.J.; Xu, S.; Elvidge, C.D.; Hoffmann, L.; Azeem, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Dark Side of Hurricane Matthew: Unique Perspectives from the VIIRS Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.  
  Volume 99 Issue 12 Pages (down) 2561-2574  
  Keywords remote sensing  
  Abstract Hurricane Matthew (28 Sep – 9 October 2016) was perhaps the most infamous storm of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, claiming over 600 lives and causing over $15 billion USD in damages across the central Caribbean and southeastern U.S. seaboard. Research surrounding Matthew and its many noteworthy meteorological characteristics (e.g., rapid intensification into the southernmost Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin on record, strong lightning and sprite production, and unusual cloud morphology) is ongoing. Satellite remote sensing typically plays an important role in the forecasting and study of hurricanes, providing a top-down perspective on storms developing over the remote and inherently data sparse tropical oceans. In this regard, a relative newcomer among the suite of satellite observations useful for tropical cyclone monitoring and research is the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB), a sensor flying onboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. Unlike conventional instruments, the DNB's sensitivity to extremely low levels of visible/near-infrared light offers new insight on storm properties and impacts. Here, we chronicle Matthew’s path of destruction and peer through the DNB’s looking glass of low-light visible observations, including lightning connected to sprite formation, modulation of the atmospheric nightglow by storm-generated gravity waves, and widespread power outages. Collected without moonlight, these examples showcase the wealth of unique information present in DNB nocturnal low-light observations without moonlight, and their potential to complement traditional satellite measurements of tropical storms worldwide.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1959  
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