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Author Portugal, S. J., White, C. R., Frappell, P. B.m Green, J. A., & Butler, P. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impacts of “supermoon” events on the physiology of a wild bird Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages (down) 7974-7984  
  Keywords Animals; Moonlight  
  Abstract The position of the Moon in relation to the Earth and the Sun gives rise to several predictable cycles, and natural changes in nighttime light intensity are known to cause alterations to physiological processes and behaviors in many animals. The limited research undertaken to date on the physiological responses of animals to the lunar illumination has exclusively focused on the synodic lunar cycle (full moon to full moon, or moon phase) but the moon's orbit—its distance from the Earth—may also be relevant. Every month, the moon moves from apogee, its most distant point from Earth—and then to perigee, its closest point to Earth. Here, we studied wild barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) to investigate the influence of multiple interacting lunar cycles on the physiology of diurnally active animals. Our study, which uses biologging technology to continually monitor body temperature and heart rate for an entire annual cycle, asks whether there is evidence for a physiological response to natural cycles in lunar brightness in wild birds, particularly “supermoon” phenomena, where perigee coincides with a full moon. There was a three‐way interaction between lunar phase, lunar distance, and cloud cover as predictors of nighttime mean body

temperature, such that body temperature was highest on clear nights when the full

moon coincided with perigee moon. Our study is the first to report the physiological responses of wild birds to “supermoon” events; the wild geese responded to the combination of two independent lunar cycles, by significantly increasing their body temperature at night. That wild birds respond to natural fluctuations in nighttime ambient light levels support the documented responses of many species to anthropogenic sources of artificial light, that birds seem unable to override. As most biological systems are arguably organized foremost by light, this suggests that any interactions between lunar cycles and local weather conditions could have significant impacts on the energy budgets of birds.
 
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2628  
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Author Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The nature of the diffuse light near cities detected in nighttime satellite imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue Pages (down) 7829  
  Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Diffuse glow has been observed around brightly lit cities in nighttime satellite imagery since at least the first publication of large scale maps in the late 1990s. In the literature, this has often been assumed to be an error related to the sensor, and referred to as “blooming”, presumably in relation to the effect that can occur when using a CCD to photograph a bright light source. Here we show that the effect seen on the DMSP/OLS, SNPP/VIIRS-DNB and ISS is not only instrumental, but in fact represents a real detection of light scattered by the atmosphere. Data from the Universidad Complutense Madrid sky brightness survey are compared to nighttime imagery from multiple sensors with differing spatial resolutions, and found to be strongly correlated. These results suggest that it should be possible for a future space-based imaging radiometer to monitor changes in the diffuse artificial skyglow of cities.  
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  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2909  
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Author Li, C.; Zhu, H.; Ye, X.; Jiang, C.; Dong, J.; Wang, D.; Wu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Study on Average Housing Prices in the Inland Capital Cities of China by Night-time Light Remote Sensing and Official Statistics Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages (down) 7732  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In this paper, the annually average Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) night-time light data is first proposed as a surrogate indicator to mine and forecast the average housing prices in the inland capital cities of China. First, based on the time-series analysis of individual cities, five regression models with gross error elimination are established between average night-time light intensity (ANLI) and average commercial residential housing price (ACRHP) adjusted by annual inflation rate or not from 2002 to 2013. Next, an optimal model is selected for predicting the ACRHPs in 2014 of these capital cities, and then verified by the interval estimation and corresponding official statistics. Finally, experimental results show that the quadratic polynomial regression is the optimal mining model for estimating the ACRHP without adjustments in most provincial capitals and the predicted ACRHP of these cities are almost in their interval estimations except for the overrated Chengdu and the underestimated Wuhan, while the adjusted ACRHP is all in prediction interval. Overall, this paper not only provides a novel insight into time-series ACRHP data mining based on time-series ANLI for capital city scale but also reveals the potentiality and mechanism of the comprehensive ANLI to characterize the complicated ACRHP. Besides, other factors influencing housing prices, such as the time-series lags of government policy, are tested and analysed in this paper.  
  Address Key Laboratory for Geographical Process Analysing and Modelling, and College of Urban and Environmental Science, Central China Normal University, 152 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, 430079, China  
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  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:32382080 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2914  
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Solano-Lamphar, H.A.; Videen, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night-sky radiometry can revolutionize the characterization of light-pollution sources globally Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 116 Issue 16 Pages (down) 7712-7717  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The city emission function (CEF), describing the angular emission from an entire city as a light source, is one of the key elements in night-sky radiance models. The CEF describes the rate at which skyglow depends on distance and is indispensable in any prediction of light-pollution propagation into nocturnal environments. Nevertheless, the CEF remains virtually unexplored because appropriate retrieval tools have been unavailable until very recently. A CEF has now been obtained from ground-based night-sky observations and establishes an experiment successfully conducted in the field to retrieve the angular emission function for an urban area. The field campaign was conducted near the city of Los Mochis, Mexico, which is well isolated from other cities and thus dominates all light emissions in its vicinity. The experiment has proven that radiometry of a night sky can provide information on the light output pattern of a distant city and allows for systematic, full-area, and cost-efficient CEF monitoring worldwide. A database of CEFs could initiate a completely new phase in light-pollution research, with significant economy and advanced accuracy of night-sky brightness predictions. The experiment and its interpretation represent unique progress in the field and contribute to our fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which direct and reflected uplight interact while forming the CEF.  
  Address Battlefield Environment Division, Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30936314; PMCID:PMC6475415 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2330  
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Author Rybnikova, N.A.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping geographical concentrations of economic activities in Europe using light at night (LAN) satellite data Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume 35 Issue 22 Pages (down) 7706-7725  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Data on geographical concentrations of economic activities, such as manufacturing, construction, wholesale and retail trade, financial services, etc., are important for identifying clusters of economic activities (EAs) and concentrations of forces behind them. However, such data are essentially sparse due to limited reporting by individual countries and administrative entities. For example, at present, Eurostat provides EA data for <50% of all regional subdivisions of the third tier of the Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS3). Measurements of light at night (LAN), as captured by satellite sensors, are likely to differ in intensity, depending on the source. As a result, LAN levels can become a marker for EAs; the present study attempts to verify this possibility. As the present analysis indicates, the inclusion of LAN intensities in multivariate models (in addition to standard economic and locational variables) helps to explain up to 88.8% of the EA variation, performing especially well for manufacturing, construction, and agriculture (the adjusted coefficient of determination (R2-adjusted) is in the range of 0.754–0.888). The study thus confirms the feasibility of using LAN satellite measurements for reconstructing geographical patterns of EAs, information that may be restricted or is unavailable due to sparse or incomplete reporting.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2664  
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