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Author Sanders, D.; Kehoe, R.; Cruse, D.; van Veen, F.J.F.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Low Levels of Artificial Light at Night Strengthen Top-Down Control in Insect Food Web Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 28 Issue 15 Pages (down) 2474-2478.e3  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light has transformed the nighttime environment of large areas of the earth, with 88% of Europe and almost 50% of the United States experiencing light-polluted night skies [1]. The consequences for ecosystems range from exposure to high light intensities in the vicinity of direct light sources to the very widespread but lower lighting levels further away [2]. While it is known that species exhibit a range of physiological and behavioral responses to artificial nighttime lighting [e.g., 3-5], there is a need to gain a mechanistic understanding of whole ecological community impacts [6, 7], especially to different light intensities. Using a mesocosm field experiment with insect communities, we determined the impact of intensities of artificial light ranging from 0.1 to 100 lux on different trophic levels and interactions between species. Strikingly, we found the strongest impact at low levels of artificial lighting (0.1 to 5 lux), which led to a 1.8 times overall reduction in aphid densities. Mechanistically, artificial light at night increased the efficiency of parasitoid wasps in attacking aphids, with twice the parasitism rate under low light levels compared to unlit controls. However, at higher light levels, parasitoid wasps spent longer away from the aphid host plants, diminishing this increased efficiency. Therefore, aphids reached higher densities under increased light intensity as compared to low levels of lighting, where they were limited by higher parasitoid efficiency. Our study highlights the importance of different intensities of artificial light in driving the strength of species interactions and ecosystem functions.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30057304 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2518  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cavazzani, S.; Ortolani, S.; Bertolo, A.; Binotto, R.; Fiorentin, P.; Carraro, G.; Saviane, I.; Zitelli, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sky Quality Meter and satellite correlation for night cloud-cover analysis at astronomical sites Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 493 Issue 2 Pages (down) 2463-2471  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The analysis of night cloud cover is very important for astronomical observations in real time, considering a typical observation time of about 15 minutes, and to provide statistics. In this article, we use the Sky Quality Meter (SQM) for high-resolution temporal analysis of the La Silla and Asiago (Ekar Observatory) sky: 3 and 5 minutes respectively. We investigate the annual temporal evolution of the natural contributions of the sky at a site not influenced by artificial light at night (ALAN) and at one highly influenced. We also make a correlation between GOES and Aqua satellite data and ground-based SQM data to confirm the relationship between the SQM data and cloud cover. We develop an algorithm that allows the use of the SQM for night cloud detection and reach correlations with the nighttime cloud cover detected by the GOES and Aqua satellites of 97.2 per cent at La Silla and 94.6 per cent at Asiago. Our algorithm also classifies photometric (PN) and spectroscopic nights (SN). We measure 59.1 per cent PN and 21.7 per cent SN for a total percentage of clear nights of 80.8 per cent at La Silla in 2018. The respective Ekar Observatory values are 31.1 per cent PN, 24.0 per cent SN and 55.1 per cent of total clear night time. Application to the SQM network would involve the development of long-term statistics and large data forecasting models for site testing and real-time astronomical observation.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2842  
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Author Farghly, M.F.A.; Mahrose, K.M.; Rehman, Z.U.; Yu, S.; Abdelfattah, M.G.; El-Garhy, O.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Intermittent lighting regime as a tool to enhance egg production and eggshell thickness in Rhode Island Red laying hens Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Poultry Science Abbreviated Journal Poult Sci  
  Volume 98 Issue 6 Pages (down) 2459–2465  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Influences of intermittent light regime as a tool to enhance egg production, egg quality, and blood parameters of laying hens were investigated. A total of 270 hens of Rhode Island Red (during 20 to 36 wk of age) were used to investigate the effects of intermittent light regime in completely randomized design. The birds were divided into 3 equal groups (6 replicates of 15 birds each) and housed in floor pens. The first group was served as non-treated control (C) and was exposed to continuous and constant light for 16 h light/day throughout the experimental period. Whereas, birds of the other groups were exposed to intermittent lights for 20 min/h + 40 min of constant light (T1; FLASH20) and 40 min/h + 20 min of constant light (T2; FLASH40) during the 16 h of light period. Hens of T1 group showed significantly (P </= 0.05) the highest concentration of total antioxidant capacity and the lowest one of malondialdehyde in comparison with the other groups. Hens of T1 group had significantly (P </= 0.05) the greatest egg laying rate and egg mass in comparison with the other counterparts. Feed consumption was similar in the groups under study. Hens exposed to FLASH20 had the lowest (P </= 0.05) FCR when compared with the other treatments. Eggs produced from hens exposed to FLASH20 had the highest value of shell thickness followed by the control and then that of those exposed to FLASH40. There were insignificant differences among the treatments in body weight of hens and all of other egg quality and egg problem traits. In conclusion, intermittent light regime of 20 min/h was the most efficient in comparison with the other ones. Finally, intermittent light regime of 20 min/h during laying period (during 20 to 36 wk of age) is highly recommended.  
  Address Animal Production Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Benha University, Qalubia, Egypt  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0032-5791 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30715501 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2206  
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Author Bará, S.; Aubé, M.; Barentine, J.; Zamorano, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Magnitude to luminance conversions and visual brightness of the night sky Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume 493 Issue 2 Pages (down) 2429–2437  
  Keywords Skyglow; light pollution; atmospheric effects; techniques: photometric; methods: numerical; luminance  
  Abstract The visual brightness of the night sky is not a single-valued function of its brightness in other photometric bands, because the transformations between photometric systems depend on the spectral power distribution of the skyglow. We analyze the transformation between the night sky brightness in the Johnson-Cousins V band (mV, measured in magnitudes per square arcsecond, mpsas) and its visual luminance (L, in SI units cd m−2) for observers with photopic and scotopic adaptation, in terms of the spectral power distribution of the incident light. We calculate the zero-point luminances for a set of skyglow spectra recorded at different places in the world, including strongly light-polluted locations and sites with nearly pristine natural dark skies. The photopic skyglow luminance corresponding to mV = 0.00 mpsas is found to vary between 1.11–1.34 × 105 cd m−2 if mV is reported in the absolute (AB) magnitude scale, and between 1.18–1.43 × 105 cd m−2 if a Vega scale for mV is used instead. The photopic luminance for mV = 22.0 mpsas is correspondingly comprised between 176 and 213 μcd m−2 (AB), or 187 and 227 μcd m−2 (Vega). These constants tend to decrease for increasing correlated color temperatures (CCT). The photopic zero-point luminances are generally higher than the ones expected for blackbody radiation of comparable CCT. The scotopic-to-photopic luminance ratio (S/P) for our spectral dataset varies from 0.8 to 2.5. Under scotopic adaptation the dependence of the zero-point luminances with the CCT, and their values relative to blackbody radiation, are reversed with respect to photopic ones.  
  Address Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia; salva.bara(at)usc.gal  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2825  
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Author Shinobu Yasuo, Ayaka Iwamoto, Sang-il Lee, Shotaro Ochiai, Rina Hitachi, Satomi Shibata, Nobuo Uotsu, Chie Tarumizu, Sayuri Matsuoka, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shigekazu Higuchi url  doi
openurl 
  Title L-Serine Enhances Light-Induced Circadian Phase Resetting in Mice and Humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Nutrition Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 147 Issue 12 Pages (down) 2347-2355  
  Keywords Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract Background: The circadian clock is modulated by the timing of ingestion or food composition, but the effects of specific nutrients are poorly understood.

Objective: We aimed to identify the amino acids that modulate the circadian clock and reset the light-induced circadian phase in mice and humans.

Methods: Male CBA/N mice were orally administered 1 of 20 L-amino acids, and the circadian and light-induced phase shifts of wheel-running activity were analyzed. Antagonists of several neurotransmitter pathways were injected before L-serine administration, and light-induced phase shifts were analyzed. In addition, the effect of L-serine on the light-induced phase advance was investigated in healthy male students (mean ± SD age 22.2 ± 1.8 y) by using dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) determined by saliva samples as an index of the circadian phase.

Results: L-Serine administration enhanced light-induced phase shifts in mice (1.86-fold; P < 0.05). Both L-serine and its metabolite D-serine, a coagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, exerted this effect, but D-serine concentrations in the hypothalamus did not increase after L-serine administration. The effect of L-serine was blocked by picrotoxin, an antagonist of &#947;-aminobutyric acid A receptors, but not by MK801, an antagonist of NMDA receptors. L-Serine administration altered the long-term expression patterns of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. After advancing the light-dark cycle by 6 h, L-serine administration slightly accelerated re-entrainment to the shifted cycle. In humans, L-serine ingestion before bedtime induced significantly larger phase advances of DLMO after bright-light exposure during the morning (means ± SEMs—L-serine: 25.9 ± 6.6 min; placebo: 12.1 ± 7.0 min; P < 0.05).

Conclusion: These results suggest that L-serine enhances light-induced phase resetting in mice and humans, and it may be useful for treating circadian disturbances.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1784  
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