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Author Zhang, F.-S.; Wang, Y.; Wu, K.; Xu, W.-Y.; Wu, J.; Liu, J.-Y.; Wang, X.-Y.; Shuai, L.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of artificial light at night on foraging behavior and vigilance in a nocturnal rodent Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume In press Issue Pages (down) 138271  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night has greatly changed the physical environment for many organisms on a global scale. As an energy efficient light resource, light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been widely used in recent years. As LEDs often have a broad spectrum, many biological processes may be potentially affected. In this study, we conducted manipulated experiments in rat-proof enclosures to explore the effects of LED night lighting on behavior of a nocturnal rodent, the Mongolian five-toed jerboa (Allactaga sibirica). We adopted the giving-up density (GUD) method and camera video trapping to study behavioral responses in terms of patch use, searching efficiency and vigilance. With the presence of white LED lighting, jerboas spent less time in patches, foraged less intensively (with higher GUDs) and became vigilant more frequently, while their searching efficiency was higher than under dark treatment. Although both positive and negative effects of LEDs on foraging were detected, the net effect of LEDs on jerboas is negative, which may further translate into changes in population dynamics, inter-specific interaction and community structure. This is the first study to explore the effects of LED lighting on foraging behavior and search efficiency in rodents with the potential positive effects of using artificial light regimes as a pest management tool.  
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  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2877  
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Author Kozaki, T.; Hidaka, Y.; Takakura, J.-Y.; Kusano, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Salivary melatonin suppression under 100-Hz flickering blue light and non-flickering blue light conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neurosci Lett  
  Volume 722 Issue Pages (down) 134857  
  Keywords Human Health; Flickering light; Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell; Light; Light emitting diode; Melatonin  
  Abstract Bright light at night has been known to suppress melatonin secretion. Photoreceptors, known as intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), project dark/bright information into the superchiasmatic nucleus, which regulates the circadian system. Electroretinograms of ipRGCs show fluctuation that is synchronized with light ON-OFF stimulation. This finding suggests that the flickering condition of light may have an impact on our circadian system. In this study, we evaluate light-induced melatonin suppression under flickering and non-flickering light conditions. Fifteen male subjects between the ages of 20 and 23 years (mean +/- SD, 21.9 +/- 1.9) were exposed to three light conditions (dim, 100-Hz flickering and non-flickering light) from 1:00 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. Saliva samples were taken just before 1:00 and at 1:15, 1:30, 2:00, and 2:30 a.m. Repeated-measure t-test with Bonferroni correction showed a significant decrease in melatonin levels under both 100-Hz and non-flickering light conditions compared to dim light conditions after 2:00 a.m. Moreover, at 2:30 a.m., the rate of change in melatonin level under 100 Hz of flickering light was significantly lower than that under non-flickering light. Our present findings suggest that 100-Hz flickering light may suppress melatonin secretion more than non-flickering light.  
  Address Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Nishikyushu University, 4490-9 Osaki, Kanzaki, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3940 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32097701 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2855  
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Author Xue, X.; Lin, Y.; Zheng, Q.; Wang, K.; Zhang, J.; Deng, J.; Abubakar, G.A.; Gan, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping the fine-scale spatial pattern of artificial light pollution at night in urban environments from the perspective of bird habitats Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 702 Issue Pages (down) 134725  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; ALAN pollution; Circuitscape; Land cover; Nighttime light image; Urban ecology  
  Abstract The increase in artificial light at night (ALAN) is a global concern, while the pattern of ALAN pollution inside urban areas has not yet been fully explored. To fill this gap, we developed a novel method to map fine-scale ALAN pollution patterns in urban bird habitats using high spatial resolution ALAN satellite data. First, an ALAN pollution map was derived from JL1-3B satellite images. Then, the core habitat nodes (CHNs) representing the main habitats for urban birds to inhabit were identified from the land cover map, which was produced using Gaofen2 (GF2) data, and the high probability corridors (HPCs), indicating high connectivity paths, were derived from Circuitscape software. Finally, the ALAN patterns in the CHNs and HPCs were analysed, and the mismatch index was proposed to evaluate the trade-off between human activity ALAN demands and ALAN supply for the protection of urban birds. The results demonstrated that 115 woodland patches covering 4149.0ha were selected as CHNs, and most of the CHNs were large urban parks or scenic spots located in the urban fringe. The 2923 modelled HPCs occupying 1179.2ha were small remaining vegetation patches and vegetated corridors along the major transport arteries. The differences in the ALAN pollution patterns between CHNs and HPCs were mainly determined by the characteristics of the green space patches and the light source types. The polluted regions in the CHNs were clustered in a few regions that suffered from concentrated and intensive ALAN, while most of the CHNs remained unaffected. In contrast, the 727 HPCs were mainly polluted by street lighting was scattered and widely distributed, resulting a more varying influence to birds than that in the CHNs. Relating patterns of the ALAN to bird habitats and connectivity provides meaningful information for comprehensive planning to alleviate the disruptive effects of ALAN pollution.  
  Address College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, Zhejiang, China. Electronic address: ganmuye@zju.edu.cn  
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  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31734607 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2765  
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Author Moaraf, S.; Vistoropsky, Y.; Pozner, T.; Heiblum, R.; Okuliarova, M.; Zeman, M.; Barnea, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night affects brain plasticity and melatonin in birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neurosci Lett  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 134639  
  Keywords Animals; Artificial Light At Night (ALAN); cell proliferation; circadian cycle; melatonin; neuronal densities; zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN), which disrupts the daily cycle of light, has vast biological impacts on all organisms, and is also associated with several health problems. The few existing studies on neuronal plasticity and cognitive functions in mammals indicate that a disruption of the circadian cycle impairs learning and memory and suppresses neurogenesis. However, nothing is known about the effect of ALAN on neuronal plasticity in birds. To this end, zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were exposed to ecologically relevant ALAN intensities (0.5, 1.5 and 5 lux), treated with BrdU to quantify cell proliferation in their ventricular zone (VZ), and compared to controls that were kept under dark nights. We found, in our diurnal birds, that ALAN significantly increased cell proliferation in the VZ. However, neuronal densities in two brain regions decreased under ALAN, suggesting neuronal death. In addition, ALAN suppressed nocturnal melatonin production in a dose-dependent manner, and might also increase body mass. Taken together, our findings add to the notion of the deleterious effect of ALAN.  
  Address Department of Natural and Life Sciences, The Open University of Israel, Ra'anana, 43107, Israel  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3940 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31760086 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2760  
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Author Vanbergen, A.J.; Potts, S.G.; Vian, A.; Malkemper, E.P.; Young, J.; Tscheulin, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Risk to pollinators from anthropogenic electro-magnetic radiation (EMR): Evidence and knowledge gaps Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume 695 Issue Pages (down) 133833  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; review; anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation; AREMR; bees; Apis mellifera; pollinators  
  Abstract Worldwide urbanisation and use of mobile and wireless technologies (5G, Internet of Things) is leading to the proliferation of anthropogenic electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and campaigning voices continue to call for the risk to human health and wildlife to be recognised. Pollinators provide many benefits to nature and humankind, but face multiple anthropogenic threats. Here, we assess whether artificial light at night (ALAN) and anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (AREMR), such as used in wireless technologies or emitted from power lines, represent an additional and growing threat to pollinators. A lack of high quality scientific studies means that knowledge of the risk to pollinators from anthropogenic EMR is either inconclusive, unresolved, or only partly established. A handful of studies provide evidence that ALAN can alter pollinator communities, pollination and fruit set. Laboratory experiments provide some, albeit variable, evidence that the honey bee Apis mellifera and other invertebrates can detect EMR, potentially using it for orientation or navigation, but they do not provide evidence that AREMR affects insect behaviour in ecosystems. Scientifically robust evidence of AREMR impacts on abundance or diversity of pollinators (or other invertebrates) are limited to a single study reporting positive and negative effects depending on the pollinator group and geographical location. Therefore, whether anthropogenic EMR (ALAN or AREMR) poses a significant threat to insect pollinators and the benefits they provide to ecosystems and humanity remains to be established.  
  Address Agroécologie, AgroSup Dijon, INRA, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, F-21000 Dijon, France; adam.vanbergen(at)inra.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2613  
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