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Author Ardavani, O.; Zerefos, S.; Doulos, L.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Redesigning the exterior lighting as part of the urban landscape: The role of transgenic bioluminescent plants in mediterranean urban and suburban lighting environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production  
  Volume 242 Issue Pages (down) 118477  
  Keywords Plants; Lighting  
  Abstract This research discusses the feasibility of replacing or supporting artificial lighting with Transgenic Bioluminescent Plants (TBP), as a means of minimizing light pollution, reducing electrical energy consumption and de-carbonizing urban and suburban outdoor environments, creating sustainable conditions and enriching the quality of life. Until now, no information is given about the light output of any TBPs and the question “Are the TBPs capable of producing the necessary lighting levels for exterior lighting?” is unanswered. For this reason, a new methodology is proposed for selecting and analyzing the lighting output potential of transgenic plants ted for specific climatic conditions. This methodology considers growth and reduction factors, as well as a formulae for estimating the plants’ luminous output by performing light measurements. Results show that transgenic plants in medium growth can emit a median luminous flux of up to 57 lm, a value that can definitely support low lighting requirements when used in large numbers of plants. From the lighting measurements and calculations performed in this research, the light output of the TBPs for a typical road with 5m width was found equal to 2lx. The amount of plants required was 40 at each side of the road for every 30m of streets with P6 road class. The results show that the use of bioluminescent plants can actually contribute to the reduction of energy consumption, concerning only the lighting criterium, thus creating an enormous opportunity for a new state-of- the-art market and research that could potentially minimize CO2 emissions and light pollution, improve urban and suburban microclimate, mitigate the effects of climate change, as well as provide an alternative means of lighting affecting both outdoor lighting design and landscape planning in suburban and urban settings. Moreover, further research should be applied considering also other possible ecological impacts before applying TBPs for exterior lighting applications.  
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  ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2711  
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Author Li, P.; Zhang, H.; Wang, X.; Song, X.; Shibasaki, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A spatial finer electric load estimation method based on night-light satellite image Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy  
  Volume 209 Issue Pages (down) 118475  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract As a fundamental parameter of the electric grid, obtaining spatial electric load distribution is the premise and basis for numerous studies. As a public, world-wide, and spatialized dataset, NPP/VIIRS night-light satellite image has been long used for socio-economic information estimation, including electric consumption, while little attention has been given to the electric load estimation. Additionally, most of the previous studies were performed at a large spatial scale, which could not reflect the electric information inner a city. Therefore, this paper proposes a method to estimate electric load density at a township-level spatial scale based on NPP/VIIRS night-light satellite data. Firstly, we reveal the different fitting relationships between EC (Electric Consumption)-NLS (Night-Light Sum) and EL (Electric Load)-NLI (Night-Light Intensity). Then, we validated the spatial-scale’s influence on the estimation accuracy by experiment via generating a series of simulated datasets. After working out the super-resolution night-light image with the SRCNN (Super-Resolution Convolutional Neural Network) algorithm, we established a finer spatial estimation model. By taking a monthly data of Shanghai as a case study, we validate the model we established. The result shows that estimating electric load at township-level based on night-light satellite data is feasible, and the SRCNN algorithm can improve the performance.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3068  
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Author Russart, K.L.G.; Chbeir, S.A.; Nelson, R.J.; Magalang, U.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night exacerbates metabolic dysfunction in a polygenic mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci  
  Volume 231 Issue Pages (down) 116574  
  Keywords Animals; diabetes; human health; mouse models; Type 2 diabetes; Insulin Resistance  
  Abstract AIMS: Electric lighting is beneficial to modern society; however, it is becoming apparent that light at night (LAN) is not without biological consequences. Several studies have reported negative effects of LAN on health and behavior in humans and nonhuman animals. Exposure of non-diabetic mice to dim LAN impairs glucose tolerance, whereas a return to dark nights (LD) reverses this impairment. We predicted that exposure to LAN would exacerbate the metabolic abnormalities in TALLYHO/JngJ (TH) mice, a polygenic model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We exposed 7-week old male TH mice to either LD or LAN for 8-10weeks in two separate experiments. After 8weeks of light treatment, we conducted intraperitoneal glucose tolerance testing (ipGTT) followed by intraperitoneal insulin tolerance testing (ipITT). In Experiment 1, all mice were returned to LD for 4weeks, and ipITT was repeated. KEY FINDINGS: The major results of this study are i) LAN exposure for 8weeks exacerbates glucose intolerance and insulin resistance ii) the effects of LAN on insulin resistance are reversed upon return to LD, iii) LAN exposure results in a greater increase in body weight compared to LD exposure, iv) LAN increases the incidence of mice developing overt T2DM, and v) LAN exposure decreases survival of mice with T2DM. SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, LAN exacerbated metabolic abnormalities in a polygenic mouse model of T2DM, and these effects were reversed upon return to dark nights. The applicability of these findings to humans with T2DM needs to be determined.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31207311 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2549  
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Author Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Okuliarova, M.; Senko, T.; Krskova, L.; Zeman, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night attenuates circadian rhythms in the cardiovascular system and suppresses melatonin in rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci  
  Volume 231 Issue Pages (down) 116568  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract AIMS: Cardiovascular parameters exhibit significant 24-h variability, which is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and light/dark cycles control SCN activity. We aimed to study the effects of light at night (ALAN; 1-2lx) on cardiovascular system control in normotensive rats. MAIN METHODS: Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured by telemetry during five weeks of ALAN exposure. From beat-to-beat telemetry data, we evaluated spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (sBRS). After 2 (A2) and 5 (A5) weeks of ALAN, plasma melatonin concentrations and the response of BP and HR to norepinephrine administration were measured. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and endothelin-1 was determined in the aorta. Spontaneous exploratory behaviour was evaluated in an open-field test. KEY FINDINGS: ALAN significantly suppressed the 24-h variability in the HR, BP, and sBRS after A2, although the parameters were partially restored after A5. The daily variability in the BP response to norepinephrine was reduced after A2 and restored after A5. ALAN increased the BP response to norepinephrine compared to the control after A5. Increased eNOS expression was found in arteries after A2 but not A5. Endothelin-1 expression was not affected by ALAN. Plasma melatonin levels were suppressed after A2 and A5. Spontaneous exploratory behaviour was reduced. SIGNIFICANCE: ALAN decreased plasma melatonin and the 24-h variability in the haemodynamic parameters and increased the BP response to norepinephrine. A low intensity ALAN can suppress circadian control of the cardiovascular system with negative consequences on the anticipation of a load.  
  Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31202842 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2548  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author van Hasselt, S.J.; Hut, R.A.; Allocca, G.; Vyssotski, A.L.; Piersma, T.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Meerlo, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cloud cover amplifies the sleep-suppressing effect of artificial light at night in geese Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 116444  
  Keywords Animals; Skyglow  
  Abstract In modern society the night sky is lit up not only by the moon but also by artificial light devices. Both of these light sources can have a major impact on wildlife physiology and behaviour. For example, a number of bird species were found to sleep several hours less under full moon compared to new moon and a similar sleep-suppressing effect has been reported for artificial light at night (ALAN). Cloud cover at night can modulate the light levels perceived by wildlife, yet, in opposite directions for ALAN and moon. While clouds will block moon light, it may reflect and amplify ALAN levels and increases the night glow in urbanized areas. As a consequence, cloud cover may also modulate the sleep-suppressing effects of moon and ALAN in different directions. In this study we therefore measured sleep in barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) under semi-natural conditions in relation to moon phase, ALAN and cloud cover. Our analysis shows that, during new moon nights stronger cloud cover was indeed associated with increased ALAN levels at our study site. In contrast, light levels during full moon nights were fairly constant, presumably because of moonlight on clear nights or because of reflected artificial light on cloudy nights. Importantly, cloud cover caused an estimated 24.8% reduction in the amount of night-time NREM sleep from nights with medium to full cloud cover, particularly during new moon when sleep was unaffected by moon light. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cloud cover can, in a rather dramatic way, amplify the immediate effects of ALAN on wildlife. Sleep appears to be highly sensitive to ALAN and may therefore be a good indicator of its biological effects.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3239  
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