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Author Chaiwat, Thanee
Title Night Lights, Economic Growth, and Spatial Inequality of Thailand Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication PIER Discussion Papers Abbreviated Journal
Volume 26 Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract This paper explains the method using a set of night light imaginary to estimate GPP of Thailand. This method is quite new but widely acceptable in the area of economics because luminosity of night lights is normally based on the amount of economic activities in each area. The results showed a high and significant correlation betweein the night lights and the GPP growth. Even if the estimation was controlled by some specific factors, such as population density, timing size of agricultural or manufacturing sector, the relationship is still robust. After this relationship is confirmed in the provincial level of Thailand, this research applied the results to show the relationship between economic values and spatial inequality, which indicates new understanding about spatial development patterns.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Thai Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2170
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Author Caorsi, V.; Sprau, P.; Zollinger, S.A.; Brumm, H.
Title Nocturnal resting behaviour in urban great tits and its relation to anthropogenic disturbance and microclimate Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 73 Issue 2 Pages (up)
Keywords Animals
Abstract The ecological novelty of urbanisation poses many challenges to animals. We investigated whether anthropogenic disturbance (artificial light at night and noise) and abiotic factors in cities (temperature and humidity) predict nocturnal activity and rest in free-living urban great tits (Parus major). Our study is the first to relate nocturnal rest in wild birds to levels of noise pollution during the night, an issue that has been shown to be particularly damaging to human health. Unlike previous work on nocturnal behaviour of urban birds, we considered the combined effect of anthropogenic disturbance and urban microclimate to acknowledge that the umwelt of an animal is composed of multiple environmental variables. Using infrared cameras, we observed the nocturnal resting behaviour as a proxy for sleep in 17 birds in nest boxes deployed across the city of Munich, Germany. Although we found marked differences in resting behaviour between individuals, this variation was not related to the measured environmental factors. This finding contrasts earlier studies that reported nocturnal resting behaviour of birds to vary with temperature and light exposure. Although we did not find evidence that urban environmental factors disrupt resting behaviour in great tits, their sleep might still be impaired by the anthropogenic disturbances. To elucidate this issue, further studies are necessary that, for instance, measure brain activity.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2185
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Author Bará, S., Ulla, A.
Title Light Pollution in the Galician Atlantic Islands Maritime-Terrestrial National Park 2018 Report Type Report
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Conservation; Spain; Galicia; Europe; national park
Abstract The Galician Atlantic Islands Maritime-Terrestrial National Park (PNMTIAG), with the exception of the island of Cortegada, still has night skies of acceptable quality. However, the PNMTIAG islands are under strong photic pressures, both internal and external, that hinder the preservation of the basic features of the natural night, and call for an immediate action of all concerned stakeholders
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher USC Tragsa Place of Publication Editor
Language Galician Summary Language Galician Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2187
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Author Malik, N.; Raj, A.; Dhasmana, R.; Bahadur, H.
Title Effect of Late Night Studying and Excessive Use of Video Display Terminals on the Ocular Health of Medical Undergraduate Students in A Tertiary Care Hospital Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Exp Ophthalmol
Volume 09 Issue 06 Pages (up)
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the effect of late night study and excessive use of smart phones on the ocular health of medical undergraduate students.

Design: An observational and cross-sectional study.

Participants: Two hundred and fifty nine normal and healthy M.B.B.S students of age 18-25 y were included in the study over a period of two months.

Methods: All the volunteers underwent an interview in form of a questionnaire. A complete ophthalmic examination was done including snellen visual acuity assessment, anterior segment examination with slit lamp, posterior segment with direct or indirect ophthalmoscopy; Schirmer’s test and tear film break up time.

Results: A total of 259 subjects were included in the study and maximum subjects 160 (61.8%) were females. According to age, the students were divided in two groups as I and II with age of 17-20 y and 21-23 y respectively. Maximum 195 (75.3%) students belonged to group I. Maximum subjects 245 (94.5%) were using only smartphones and 239 (92.27%) subjects were using smartphones for more than 2 y. The maximum 136 (52.51%) students studied at night with maximum using tube light 112 (43.24%). A significant association was seen between the digital device used and age of the subject (p value=0.01). Number of symptoms experienced by the students showed significant relationship with the number of hours of smartphone usage (p value=0.02). Source of light in which the students studied at night was significantly associated with the number of symptoms experienced (p value=0.03). An association between usage of smartphones (hours) showed significant relationship with slit lamp examination (tear debri) and Schirmer’s (less than 15 mm) with p value of 0.03, 0.05 respectively.

Conclusion: Source of light used to study at night and number of hours of use of devices shows relationship with symptoms. Smart phone users showed computer-related eye problems in more than half of the subjects.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2155-9570 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2197
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Author Hüppop, O.; Ciach, M.; Diehl, R.; Reynolds, D.R.; Stepanian, P.M.; Menz, M.H.M.
Title Perspectives and challenges for the use of radar in biological conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ecography Abbreviated Journal Ecography
Volume in press Issue Pages (up)
Keywords Animals; Review
Abstract Radar is at the forefront for the study of broad‐scale aerial movements of birds, bats and insects and related issues in biological conservation. Radar techniques are especially useful for investigating species which fly at high altitudes, in darkness, or which are too small for applying electronic tags. Here, we present an overview of radar applications in biological conservation and highlight its future possibilities. Depending on the type of radar, information can be gathered on local‐ to continental‐scale movements of airborne organisms and their behaviour. Such data can quantify flyway usage, biomass and nutrient transport (bioflow), population sizes, dynamics and distributions, times and dimensions of movements, areas and times of mass emergence and swarming, habitat use and activity ranges. Radar also captures behavioural responses to anthropogenic disturbances, artificial light and man‐made structures. Weather surveillance and other long‐range radar networks allow spatially broad overviews of important stopover areas, songbird mass roosts and emergences from bat caves. Mobile radars, including repurposed marine radars and commercially dedicated ‘bird radars’, offer the ability to track and monitor the local movements of individuals or groups of flying animals. Harmonic radar techniques have been used for tracking short‐range movements of insects and other small animals of conservation interest. However, a major challenge in aeroecology is determining the taxonomic identity of the targets, which often requires ancillary data obtained from other methods. Radar data have become a global source of information on ecosystem structure, composition, services and function and will play an increasing role in the monitoring and conservation of flying animals and threatened habitats worldwide.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2204
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