|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.
Title Urban Lighting Masterplan—Definitions, Methodologies and Collaboration Type Book Chapter
Year 2019 Publication Urban Lighting for People: Evidence—Based Lighting Design for the Built Environment Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 18–41
Keywords Planning
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher RIBA Publishing Place of Publication London, UK Editor Davoudian, N.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 9780367814588 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2934
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sairom, L.; Choon, C.
Title An Analysis of the Classification of Seoul's Environmental Lighting Zones based on a High-Resolution Light Pollution Map – Focusing on the Land-Use of Lighting Zone 3 and Lighting Zone 4 Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Architectural Institute of Korea Abbreviated Journal
Volume 36 Issue 11 Pages 171-180
Keywords Planning
Abstract The purpose of this study is to analyze the classification of Seoul's environmental lighting zone based on a high-resolution light pollution map of Seoul. This map was created through a data integration of night time images produced by VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) and ISS (International Space Station). This map provides a detailed space grid of light pollution which allows for a quantitative analysis of the light pollution in Seoul. There are four different environmental lighting zones in Seoul based on land use: Commercial/Industrial zones, Residential zones, Green zones and Protected natural areas. These zones have corresponding light emission standards by regulation in which the emission standards decrease in the order listed. Using the Grasshopper Image Sampler Algorithm of the light pollution map, this paper examines whether the current environmental lighting zone regulations agree with the current state of light pollution level. The result shows that a lot of residential areas of the 25 District of Seoul have the same or even higher light pollution level than commercial areas. This is because a lot of the residential areas have mix-used facilities where high levels of commercial activities occur at night, making the city at higher risk of light pollution. In lighting zone 3, residential zones, there is a clear pattern showing that 2nd class residential zones, 3rd class residential zones and mixed-use residential areas have higher light pollution levels than purely residential areas and 1st class residential zones. Between commercial zones and industrial zones which are both categorized as lighting zones 4, some industrial zones have lower light emission levels than residential zones at night depending on the type of business. Therefore, this research suggests lighting sub-zones for areas to have higher or lower light emission standards depending on its local land-use conditions and commercial activities for a more efficient way to manage and govern light pollution levels at night.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Korean Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2733-6247 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3433
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ahyar, M.; Pramudya, Y.; Okimustava, O.
Title Implementasi Sistem Pengolahan Data Sky Quality Meter Berbasis Visual Basic Untuk Analisis Perubahan Tingkat Kecerahan Langit Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Jurnal Kumparan Fisika Abbreviated Journal
Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 239-246
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Light pollution dramatically affects the brightness of the sky. Sky brightness level can be measured using Sky Quality Meter (SQM). SQM data results are huge data. It needs an application to facilitate data processing. Microsoft Excel Visual Basic features can assist the SQM data processing. The study used observational methods of sky brightness with SQM. Data analysis using the moving average method. Software development used the waterfall model with five stages of modeling, namely: analysis, design, implementation, testing, and maintenance. The waterfall development model was able to create an SQM data processing system. The data with various columns can be selected automatically and quickly. Hence, it is able to graph the level of sky brightness versus time.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Indonesian Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2655-1403 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3316
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gagliardi, G.; Lupia, M.; Cario, G.; Tedesco, F.; Cicchello Gaccio, F.; Lo Scudo, F.; Casavola, A.
Title Advanced Adaptive Street Lighting Systems for Smart Cities Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Smart Cities Abbreviated Journal Smart Cities
Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 1495-1512
Keywords Lighting; Energy
Abstract This paper reports the results of a recently concluded R&D project, SCALS (Smart Cities Adaptive Lighting System), which aimed at the development of all hardware/software components of an adaptive urban smart lighting architecture allowing municipalities to manage and control public street lighting lamps. The system is capable to autonomously adjust street lamps’ brightness on the basis of the presence of vehicles (busses/trucks, cars, motorcycles and bikes) and/or pedestrians in specific areas or segments of the streets/roads of interest to reduce the energy consumption. The main contribution of this work is to design a low cost smart lighting system and, at same time, to define an IoT infrastructure where each lighting pole is an element of a network that can increase their amplitude. More generally, the proposed smart infrastructure can be viewed as the basis of a wider technological architecture aimed at offering value-added services for sustainable cities. The smart architecture combines various sub-systems (local controllers, motion sensors, video-cameras, weather sensors) and electronic devices, each of them in charge of performing specific operations: remote street segments lamp management, single street lamp brightness control, video processing for vehicles motion detection and classification, wireless and wired data exchanges, power consumptions analysis and traffic evaluation. Two pilot sites have been built up in the project where the smart architecture has been tested and validated in real scenarios. Experimental results show that energy savings of up to 80% are possible compared to a traditional street lamp system.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2624-6511 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3274
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lowden, A.; Lemos, N.; Gonçalves, B.; Öztürk, G.; Louzada, F.; Pedrazzoli, M.; Moreno, C.
Title Delayed Sleep in Winter Related to Natural Daylight Exposure among Arctic Day Workers Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 105-116
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Natural daylight exposures in arctic regions vary substantially across seasons. Negative consequences have been observed in self-reports of sleep and daytime functions during the winter but have rarely been studied in detail. The focus of the present study set out to investigate sleep seasonality among indoor workers using objective and subjective measures. Sleep seasonality among daytime office workers (n = 32) in Kiruna (Sweden, 67.86° N, 20.23° E) was studied by comparing the same group of workers in a winter and summer week, including work and days off at the weekend, using actigraphs (motion loggers) and subjective ratings of alertness and mood. Actigraph analyses showed delayed sleep onset of 39 min in winter compared to the corresponding summer week (p < 0.0001) and shorter weekly sleep duration by 12 min (p = 0.0154). A delay of mid-sleep was present in winter at workdays (25 min, p < 0.0001) and more strongly delayed during days off (46 min, p < 0.0001). Sleepiness levels were higher in winter compared to summer (p < 0.05). Increased morning light exposure was associated with earlier mid-sleep (p < 0.001), while increased evening light exposure was associated with delay (p < 0.01). This study confirms earlier work that suggests that lack of natural daylight delays the sleep/wake cycle in a group of indoor workers, despite having access to electric lighting. Photic stimuli resulted in a general advanced sleep/wake rhythm during summer and increased alertness levels.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2137
Permanent link to this record