|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Giraudeau, M.; Sepp, T.; Ujvari, B.; Ewald, P.W.; Thomas, F.
Title Human activities might influence oncogenic processes in wild animal populations Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol
Volume 2 Issue Pages 1065-1070
Keywords Commentary; Animals
Abstract Based on the abundant studies available on humans showing clear associations between rapid environmental changes and the rate of neoplasia, we propose that human activities might increase cancer rate in wild populations through numerous processes. Most of the research on this topic has concentrated on wildlife cancer prevalence in environments that are heavily contaminated with anthropogenic chemicals. Here, we propose that human activities might also increase cancer rate in wild populations through additional processes including light pollution, accidental (for example, human waste) or intentional (for example, bird feeders) wildlife feeding (and the associated change of diet), or reduction of genetic diversity in human-impacted habitats. The human species can thus be defined as an oncogenic species, moderating the environment in the way that it causes cancer in other wild populations. As human impacts on wildlife are predicted to increase rather than decrease (for example, in the context of urbanization), acknowledging the possible links between human activity and cancer in wild populations is crucial.
Address MIVEGEC, Montpellier, France. frederic.thomas2@ird.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2397-334X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29784981 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1921
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Halfwerk, W.; Blaas, M.; Kramer, L.; Hijner, N.; Trillo, P.A.; Bernal, X.E.; Page, R.A.; Goutte, S.; Ryan, M.J.; Ellers, J.
Title Adaptive changes in sexual signalling in response to urbanization Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol
Volume 3 Issue Pages 374-380
Keywords Animals
Abstract Urbanization can cause species to adjust their sexual displays, because the effectiveness of mating signals is influenced by environmental conditions. Despite many examples that show that mating signals in urban conditions differ from those in rural conditions, we do not know whether these differences provide a combined reproductive and survival benefit to the urban phenotype. Here we show that male tungara frogs have increased the conspicuousness of their calls, which is under strong sexual and natural selection by signal receivers, as an adaptive response to city life. The urban phenotype consequently attracts more females than the forest phenotype, while avoiding the costs that are imposed by eavesdropping bats and midges, which we show are rare in urban areas. Finally, we show in a translocation experiment that urban frogs can reduce risk of predation and parasitism when moved to the forest, but that forest frogs do not increase their sexual attractiveness when moved to the city. Our findings thus reveal that urbanization can rapidly drive adaptive signal change via changes in both natural and sexual selection pressures.
Address Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2397-334X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30532046 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2136
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sanders, D.; Frago, E.; Kehoe, R.; Patterson, C.; Gaston, K.J.
Title A meta-analysis of biological impacts of artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Ecology; meta-analysis; biology
Abstract Natural light cycles are being eroded over large areas of the globe by the direct emissions and sky brightening that result from sources of artificial night-time light. This is predicted to affect wild organisms, particularly because of the central role that light regimes play in determining the timing of biological activity. Although many empirical studies have reported such effects, these have focused on particular species or local communities and have thus been unable to provide a general evaluation of the overall frequency and strength of these impacts. Using a new database of published studies, we show that exposure to artificial light at night induces strong responses for physiological measures, daily activity patterns and life history traits. We found particularly strong responses with regards to hormone levels, the onset of daily activity in diurnal species and life history traits, such as the number of offspring, predation, cognition and seafinding (in turtles). So far, few studies have focused on the impact of artificial light at night on ecosystem functions. The breadth and often strength of biological impacts we reveal highlight the need for outdoor artificial night-time lighting to be limited to the places and forms-such as timing, intensity and spectrum-where it is genuinely required by the people using it to minimize ecological impacts.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, UK.; k.j.gaston ( at ) exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2397-334X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33139919 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3197
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Conrad, J.; Shatwell, T.
Title Lunar illuminated fraction is a poor proxy for moonlight exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol
Volume 4 Issue Pages 318-319
Keywords Animals; Moonlight; Commentary
Abstract San-Jose et al. recently demonstrated that the colouration of barn owls impacts their hunting success under moonlit conditions, and therefore affects their reproductive success1. They found that near full-moon conditions, the youngest nestlings with white fathers were fed more and were likelier to survive than those with redder fathers. While the study is interesting, the percentage of the Moon that is illuminated (lunar illuminated fraction) is unfortunately a poor proxy for moonlight exposure. We suggest that lunar illluminated fraction should, in general, never be used in biological studies, as alternative variables such as horizontal illuminance better represent moonlight exposure, and therefore offer a greater chance of detecting the effects of moonlight. Here, we provide a brief explanation of how moonlight varies with season and time of night, and stress the need for greater collaboration between biologists and astronomers or physicists in such studies in the future.
Address Seenforschung, Helmholtz-Zentrum fur Umweltforschung-UFZ, Magdeburg, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2397-334X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32015523 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2827
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ogoro M.; Ernest S. J.; Chukwudi D. O.
Title Spatial Trend Of Light Pollution In Obio/Akpor Lga, Rivers State, Nigeria Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Novel Research in Civil Structural and Earth Sciences Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Lighting; Perception
Abstract The study examines the spatial trend of light pollution across the study area. The Global Positioning System (GPS) was used to acquire the coordinates of each respondent resident, where structured questionnaire were administered in the study area and then imported to the ArcGIS 9.3 software environment to analyse the spatial trend in light pollution using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) method of interpolation. Findings, reveals that the perception of pollution by light stray is obviously noticed by the respondents with particular emphasis on light stray from traffic light, neighbor security lights which to a large extend alters their level of comfort and distort their level of outdoor relaxation. Thus, the study recommends, among others, that: shielded light bulbs or properly designed light fittings should be installed to avoid light rays spreading beyond the needed boundaries. And measure should be taken to ensure car drivers use properly fixed headlamps that are not damaged and also, awareness should be passed on adequate use of headlamps by road users (vehicle drivers) on streets when compared with use on highways and minor roads.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2394-7357 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3205
Permanent link to this record