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Author Zhang, P.; Pan, J.; Xie, L.; Zhou, T.; Bai, H.; Zhu, Y.
Title Spatial–Temporal Evolution and Regional Differentiation Features of Urbanization in China from 2003 to 2013 Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 31
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Quantifying the temporal and spatial patterns of impervious surfaces (IS) is important for assessing the environmental and ecological impacts of urbanization. In order to better extract IS, and to explore the divergence in urbanization in different regions, research on the regional differentiation features and regional change difference features of IS are required. To extract China’s 2013 urban impervious area, we used the 2013 night light (NTL) data and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) temporal series data, and used three urban impervious surface extraction indexes—Human Settlements Index, Vegetation-Adjusted NTL Urban Index, and the EVI-adjusted NTL index (EANTLI)—which are recognized as the best and most widely used indexes for extracting urban impervious areas. We used the classification results of the Landsat-8 images as the benchmark data to visually compare and verify the results of the urban impervious area extracted by the three indexes. We determined that the EANTLI index better reflects the distribution of the impervious area. Therefore, we used the EANTLI index to extract the urban impervious area from 2003 to 2013 in the study area, and researched the spatial and temporal differentiation in urban IS. The results showed that China’s urban IS area was 70,179.06 km2, accounting for 0.73% of the country’s land area in 2013, compared with 20,565.24 km2 in 2003, which accounted for 0.21% of the land area, representing an increase of 0.52%. On a spatial scale, like economic development, the distribution of urban impervious surfaces was different in different regions. The overall performance of the urban IS percentage was characterized by a decreasing trend from Northwest China, Southwest China, the Middle Reaches of the Yellow River, Northeast China, the Middle Reaches of the Yangtze River, Southern Coastal China, and Northern Coastal China to Eastern Coastal China. On the provincial scale, the urban IS expansion showed considerable differences in different regions. The overall performance of the Urban IS Expansion index showed that the eastern coastal areas had higher values than the western inland areas. The cities or provinces of Beijing, Tianjin, Jiangsu, and Shanghai had the largest growth in impervious areas. Spatially and temporally quantifying the change in urban impervious areas can help to better understand the intensity of urbanization in a region. Therefore, quantifying the change in urban impervious area has an important role in the study of regional environmental and economic development, policy formulation, and the rational use of resources in both time and space.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2220-9964 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2172
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Author Wang,; Sutton,; Qi,
Title Global Mapping of GDP at 1 km2 Using VIIRS Nighttime Satellite Imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi
Volume 8 Issue 12 Pages 580
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Frequent and rapid spatially explicit assessment of socioeconomic development is critical for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at both national and global levels. Over the past decades, scientists have proposed many methods for estimating human activity on the Earth’s surface at various spatiotemporal scales using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Line System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime light (NTL) data. However, the DMSP-OLS NTL data and the associated processing methods have limited their reliability and applicability for systematic measuring and mapping of socioeconomic development. This study utilized Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) NTL and the Isolation Forest machine learning algorithm for more intelligent data processing to capture human activities. We used machine learning and NTL data to map gross domestic product (GDP) at 1 km2. We then used these data products to derive inequality indexes (e.g., Gini coefficients) at nationally aggregate levels. This flexible approach processes the data in an unsupervised manner at various spatial scales. Our assessments show that this method produces accurate subnational GDP data products for mapping and monitoring human development uniformly across the globe.
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ISSN (down) 2220-9964 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2787
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Author Lin, J.; Shi, W.
Title Statistical Correlation between Monthly Electric Power Consumption and VIIRS Nighttime Light Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 32
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The nighttime light (NTL) imagery acquired from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) enables feasibility of investigating socioeconomic activities at monthly scale, compared with annual study using nighttime light data acquired from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS). This paper is the first attempt to discuss the quantitative correlation between monthly composite VIIRS DNB NTL data and monthly statistical data of electric power consumption (EPC), using 14 provinces of southern China as study area. Two types of regressions (linear regression and polynomial regression) and nine kinds of NTL with different treatments are employed and compared in experiments. The study demonstrates that: (1) polynomial regressions acquire higher reliability, whose average R square is 0.8816, compared with linear regressions, whose average R square is 0.8727; (2) regressions between denoised NTL with threshold of 0.3 nW/(cm2·sr) and EPC steadily exhibit the strongest reliability among the nine kinds of processed NTL data. In addition, the polynomial regressions for 12 months between denoised NTL with threshold of 0.3 nW/(cm2·sr) and EPC are constructed, whose average values of R square and mean absolute relative error are 0.8906 and 16.02%, respectively. These established optimal regression equations can be used to accurately estimate monthly EPC of each province, produce thematic maps of EPC, and analyze their spatial distribution characteristics.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2220-9964 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2820
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Author Do, Q.-T.; Shapiro, J.N.; Elvidge, C.D.; Abdel-Jelil, M.; Ahn, D.P.; Baugh, K.; Hansen-Lewis, J.; Zhizhin, M.; Bazilian, M.D.
Title Terrorism, geopolitics, and oil security: Using remote sensing to estimate oil production of the Islamic State Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Energy Research & Social Science Abbreviated Journal Energy Research & Social Science
Volume 44 Issue Pages 411-418
Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics
Abstract As the world’s most traded commodity, oil production is typically well monitored and analyzed. It also has established links to geopolitics, international relations, and security. Despite this attention, the illicit production, refining, and trade of oil and derivative products occur all over the world and provide significant revenues outside of the oversight and regulation of governments. A prominent manifestation of this phenomenon is how terrorist and insurgent organizations—including the Islamic State group, also known as ISIL/ISIS or Daesh—use oil as a revenue source. Understanding the spatial and temporal variation in production can help determine the scale of operations, technical capacity, and revenue streams. This information, in turn, can inform both security and reconstruction strategies. To this end, we use satellite multi-spectral imaging and ground-truth pre-war output data to effectively construct a real-time census of oil production in areas controlled by the ISIL terrorist group. More broadly, remotely measuring the activity of extractive industries in conflict-affected areas without reliable administrative data can support a broad range of public policy and decisions and military operations.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN (down) 2214-6296 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1864
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Author Henneken, J.; Jones, T.M.
Title Pheromones-based sexual selection in a rapidly changing world Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Current Opinion in Insect Science Abbreviated Journal Current Opinion in Insect Science
Volume 24 Issue Pages 84-88
Keywords Animals
Abstract Insects utilise chemical cues for a range of different purposes and the complexity and degree of specificity of these signals is arguably unparalleled in the animal kingdom. Chemical signals are particularly important for insect reproduction and the selective pressures driving their evolution and maintenance have been the subject of previous reviews. However, the world in which chemical cues evolved and are maintained is changing at an unprecedented rate. How (or indeed whether) chemical signals used in sexual selection will respond is largely unknown. Here, we explore how recent increases in urbanisation and associated anthropogenic impacts may affect how chemical signals are produced and perceived. We focus on four anthropomorphic influences which have the potential to interact with pheromone-mediated sexual selection processes; climatic temperature shifts, exposure to chemical pollutants, the presence of artificial light at night and nutrient availability. Our aim is to provide a broad overview of key areas where the rapidly changing environment of the future might specifically affect pheromones utilised in sexual selection.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2214-5745 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1736
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