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Author Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Casasole, G.; Dehnhard, N.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ambient anthropogenic noise but not light is associated with the ecophysiology of free-living songbird nestlings Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2754  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Urbanization is associated with dramatic increases in noise and light pollution, which affect animal behaviour, physiology and fitness. However, few studies have examined these stressors simultaneously. Moreover, effects of urbanization during early-life may be detrimental but are largely unknown. In developing great tits (Parus major), a frequently-used model species, we determined important indicators of immunity and physiological condition: plasma haptoglobin (Hp) and nitric oxide (NOx) concentration. We also determined fledging mass, an indicator for current health and survival. Associations of ambient noise and light exposure with these indicators were studied. Anthropogenic noise, light and their interaction were unrelated to fledging mass. Nestlings exposed to more noise showed higher plasma levels of Hp but not of NOx. Light was unrelated to Hp and NOx and did not interact with the effect of noise on nestlings' physiology. Increasing levels of Hp are potentially energy demanding and trade-offs could occur with life-history traits, such as survival. Effects of light pollution on nestlings of a cavity-nesting species appear to be limited. Nonetheless, our results suggest that the urban environment, through noise exposure, may entail important physiological costs for developing organisms.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN (down) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28584270; PMCID:PMC5459827 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2451  
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Author Lin, J.; Ding, X.; Hong, C.; Pang, Y.; Chen, L.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, X.; Xin, H.; Wang, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Several biological benefits of the low color temperature light-emitting diodes based normal indoor lighting source Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 7560  
  Keywords Human Health; Lighting  
  Abstract Currently, light pollution has become a nonnegligible issue in our daily life. Artificial light sources with high color temperature were deem to be the major pollution source, which could induce several adverse effects on human's health. In our previous research, we have firstly developed an artificial indoor light with low color temperature (1900 K). However, the biological effects of this artificial light on human's health are unclear. Here, four artificial lights (1900 K, 3000 K, 4000 K and 6600 K) were used to evaluate some biological changes in both human (in total 152 person-times) and murine models. Compared with other three high color temperature artificial lights, our lights (1900 K) presented a positive effect on promoting the secreting of melatonin and glutamate, protecting human's eyes, accelerating would healing and hair regeneration. These systematical studies indicated that the proposed low color temperature (1900 K) light could provide several significant benefits in human's daily life.  
  Address The National Engineering Research Center for Bioengineering Drugs and the Technologies, Institute of Translational Medicine, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, 330031, China. wangxiaolei@ncu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31101840 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2501  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nitta, Y.; Matsui, S.; Kato, Y.; Kaga, Y.; Sugimoto, K.; Sugie, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analysing the evolutional and functional differentiation of four types of Daphnia magna cryptochrome in Drosophila circadian clock Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 8857  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Cryptochrome (CRY) plays an important role in the input of circadian clocks in various species, but gene copies in each species are evolutionarily divergent. Type I CRYs function as a photoreceptor molecule in the central clock, whereas type II CRYs directly regulate the transcriptional activity of clock proteins. Functions of other types of animal CRYs in the molecular clock remain unknown. The water flea Daphnia magna contains four Cry genes. However, it is still difficult to analyse these four genes. In this study, we took advantage of powerful genetic resources available from Drosophila to investigate evolutionary and functional differentiation of CRY proteins between the two species. We report differences in subcellular localisation of each D. magna CRY protein when expressed in the Drosophila clock neuron. Circadian rhythm behavioural experiments revealed that D. magna CRYs are not functionally conserved in the Drosophila molecular clock. These findings provide a new perspective on the evolutionary conservation of CRY, as functions of the four D. magna CRY proteins have diverse subcellular localisation levels. Furthermore, molecular clocks of D. magna have been evolutionarily differentiated from those of Drosophila. This study highlights the extensive functional diversity existing among species in their complement of Cry genes.  
  Address Brain Research Institute, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan. atsushi.sugie@bri.niigata-u.ac.jp  
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  ISSN (down) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31222139; PMCID:PMC6586792 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2579  
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Author Amichai, E.; Kronfeld-Schor, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night Promotes Activity Throughout the Night in Nesting Common Swifts (Apus apus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 11052  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The use of artificial light at night (ALAN) is a rapidly expanding anthropogenic effect that transforms nightscapes throughout the world, causing light pollution that affects ecosystems in a myriad of ways. One of these is changing or shifting activity rhythms, largely synchronized by light cues. We used acoustic loggers to record and quantify activity patterns during the night of a diurnal bird – the common swift – in a nesting colony exposed to extremely intensive artificial illumination throughout the night at Jerusalem's Western Wall. We compared that to activity patterns at three other colonies exposed to none, medium, or medium-high ALAN. We found that in the lower-intensity ALAN colonies swifts ceased activity around sunset, later the more intense the lighting. At the Western Wall, however, swifts remained active throughout the night. This may have important implications for the birds' physiology, breeding cycle, and fitness, and may have cascading effects on their ecosystems.  
  Address School of Zoology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN (down) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31363144 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2594  
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Author Schirmer, A.E.; Gallemore, C.; Liu, T.; Magle, S.; DiNello, E.; Ahmed, H.; Gilday, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping behaviorally relevant light pollution levels to improve urban habitat planning Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 1-13  
  Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing; Society; remote sensing; cities; Urban planning; urban wildlife; urban ecology  
  Abstract Artificial nighttime lights have important behavioral and ecological effects on wildlife. Combining laboratory and field techniques, we identified behaviorally relevant levels of nighttime light and mapped the extent of these light levels across the city of Chicago. We began by applying a Gaussian finite mixture model to 998 sampled illumination levels around Chicago to identify clusters of light levels. A simplified sample of these levels was replicated in the laboratory to identify light levels at which C57BL/6J mice exhibited altered circadian activity patterns. We then used camera trap and high-altitude photographic data to compare our field and laboratory observations, finding activity pattern changes in the field consistent with laboratory observations. Using these results, we mapped areas across Chicago exposed to estimated illumination levels above the value associated with statistically significant behavioral changes. Based on this measure, we found that as much as 36% of the greenspace in the city is in areas illuminated at levels greater than or equal to those at which we observe behavioral differences in the field and in the laboratory. Our findings provide evidence that artificial lighting patterns may influence wildlife behavior at a broad scale throughout urban areas, and should be considered in urban habitat planning.  
  Address Northeastern Illinois University, Dept. of Biology, 5500 St. Louis Ave., Chicago, IL, 60625, USA; a-schirmer(at) neiu.edu)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  ISSN (down) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2615  
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