toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Liu, Z.; Qian, M.; Tang, X.; Hu, W.; Sun, S.; Li, G.; Zhang, S.; Meng, F.; Cao, X.; Sun, J.; Xu, C.; Tan, B.; Pang, Q.; Zhao, B.; Wang, Z.; Guan, Y.; Ruan, X.; Liu, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title SIRT7 couples light-driven body temperature cues to hepatic circadian phase coherence and gluconeogenesis Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Nature Metabolism Abbreviated Journal Nat Metab  
  Volume 1 Issue 11 Pages 1141-1156  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The central pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizes peripheral oscillators to coordinate physiological and behavioural activities throughout the body. How circadian phase coherence between the SCN and the periphery is controlled is not well understood. Here, we identify hepatic SIRT7 as an early responsive element to light that ensures circadian phase coherence in the mouse liver. The SCN-driven body temperature (BT) oscillation induces rhythmic expression of HSP70, which promotes SIRT7 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Acute temperature challenge dampens the BT oscillation and causes an advanced liver circadian phase. Further, hepatic SIRT7 deacetylates CRY1, promotes its FBXL3-mediated degradation and regulates the hepatic clock and glucose homeostasis. Loss of Sirt7 in mice leads to an advanced liver circadian phase and rapid entrainment of the hepatic clock upon daytime-restricted feeding. These data identify a BT–HSP70–SIRT7–CRY1 axis that couples the mouse hepatic clock to the central pacemaker and ensures circadian phase coherence and glucose homeostasis.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2522-5812 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2747  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Simons, A.L.; Yin, X.; Longcore, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High correlation but high scale-dependent variance between satellite measured night lights and terrestrial exposure Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal Environ. Res. Commun.  
  Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 021006  
  Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) is a significant factor in ecological and epidemiological research. Although levels of exposure are frequently estimated from satellite-based measurements of upward radiance, and the correlation between upward radiance and zenith sky brightness is established, the correlation between upward radiance and the biologically relevant exposure to light experienced from all directions on the ground has not been investigated. Because ground-based exposure to ALAN can depend on local glare sources and atmospheric scattering, ecological and epidemiological studies using upward radiance have relied on an untested relationship. To establish the nature of the relationship between upward radiance and hemispherical scalar illuminance (SI) on the ground and to calibrate future experimental studies of ALAN, we used hemispheric digital photography to measure SI at 515 locations in coastal southern California, and compared those values to co-located satellite-based measures of upward radiance as described by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellite's Day-Night Band (DNB) sensor and zenith downwards radiance as estimated by the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness (WA). We found significant variations in SI within the geographic scale defined by the resolutions of both the DNB and WA, as well as in both luminance and color correlated temperature (CCT) across individual image hemispheres. We observed up to two or more orders of magnitude in ALAN exposure within any given satellite-measured unit. Notwithstanding this variation, a linear model of log(SI) (log(SImodeled)), dependent only on the percent of the image hemisphere obscured by structures along the horizon (percent horizon) and log(WA) accounted for 76% of the variation in observed log(SI). DNB does not perform as well in alternative models and consequently future studies seeking to characterize the light environment should be built on WA data when the high temporal resolution of DNB measurements are not needed.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2515-7620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2843  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lin, P.; Yang, L.; Zhao, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urbanization effects on Chinese mammal and amphibian richness: a multi-scale study using the urban-rural gradient approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal Environ. Res. Commun.  
  Volume 2 Issue 12 Pages 125002  
  Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The scale and extent of global urbanization are unprecedented and increasing. As urbanization generally encroaches on natural habitats and the urban ecological footprint reaches far beyond the city limits, how urbanization affects biodiversity has received increasing attention from the scientific community. Nonetheless, the comprehensive syntheses of urbanization consequences for biodiversity, including diverse taxonomic groups, across multiple spatial scales and spanning a wide gradient range of urbanization intensity are still insufficient. Here, based on the urban-rural gradient approach, we assessed the effects of urbanization on Chinese mammal and amphibian richness across the entire urbanization gradient (i.e., urbanization level from 0 to 1) at the national, regional and urban agglomeration scales. We used the global mammal and amphibian distribution data along with corresponding background climate, habitat conditions and socioeconomic activities data for analysis. Our results revealed a detailed and diverse pattern of Chinese mammal and amphibian richness along the entire spectrum of urbanization gradient across three spatial scales. And an approximately monotonic decrease only existed in certain urban agglomerations. The imprint of urbanization on mammal and amphibian richness were largely masked by the overall primacy of background climate at the national and regional scales. As the scale of analysis shifting from the country to urban agglomerations, urbanization-associated variables and locally specific limiting factors started to play important roles in driving the richness patterns. Moreover, the environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis can explain the relationship between biodiversity pressure and urbanization activities in certain Chinese urban agglomerations. However, the findings of urbanization effects on biodiversity using the urban-rural gradient analysis should be interpreted with caution because many possible driving forces simultaneously present along the urban-rural gradient and are very challenging to attribute.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2515-7620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3252  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mahdi D. G.; AbdusSamad A. A. url  openurl
  Title Sleep Timing, Light at Night Exposure and it’s Health Effects Among Staff and Students of Bayero University, Kano Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Dutse Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences Abbreviated Journal DUJOPAS  
  Volume 5 Issue 2b Pages 223-230  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The invention of electricity has pervasively challenged our evolutionary adaptation of dusk to down limited light exposure leading to a conflict between our endogenous biological clocks and the environmental time thus posing a significant health concern. This study therefore explored sleep timing habits, light at night exposure and awareness of its health effects among staff and students of Basic Medical Sciences Faculty of Bayero University, Kano. Data were obtained using a semi- structured, interviewer assisted data capturing form while analysis was done using the statistical package for social sciences (SPSSV20.0) software. Quantitative data were summarized using mean±SD while qualitative data were summarized using frequencies and percentages. Independent samples t- test and person’s Chi-square were used to compare discrete and categorical variables respectively, in all cases, statistical significance was considered at P ≤ 0.05. The results indicated that all the respondents were exposed to LAN. The mean duration of LAN exposure was found to be 5.2±1.4 hours. Late retirement to bed was observed higher among male gender with male students sleeping at 00:21±1.4 hrs and female staff sleeping at 22:20±1.5 hrs. Bivariate analysis reveals a strong positive relationship between LAN exposure duration and sleep timing (r=+0.802; p=0.001) as well as sleep duration (r=-0.552; 0=0.001). On the other hand, awareness about the health effects of LAN exposure was observed to be low (17.4%) among the respondents with staff being more aware (38.5%) than students (9.1%). Finding of the present study shows that the respondents are highly exposed to LAN, had less sleep and lower awareness of the consequences of LAN exposure.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2476-8316 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3210  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Anbalagan, M.; Dauchy, R.; Xiang, S.; Robling, A.; Blask, D.; Rowan, B.; Hill, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title SAT-337 Disruption Of The Circadian Melatonin Signal By Dim Light At Night Promotes Bone-lytic Breast Cancer Metastases Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of the Endocrine Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue Supplement_1 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Cancer; Breast cancer; melatonin; shift work; mouse models  
  Abstract Breast cancer metastasis to bone is a major source of morbidity and mortality in women with advanced metastatic breast cancer. Morbidity from metastasis to bone is compounded by the fact that they cannot be surgically removed and can only be treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Thus, there is critical need to develop new treatment strategies that kill bone metastatic tumors and reduce osteolytic lesions to improve patient quality of life and extend patient survival. Circadian rhythms are daily cycles of ~24 h that control many if not most physiologic processes and their disruption by exposure to light at night (LAN) or jet lag has been shown to be strongly associated with the development of cancer, particularly breast cancer. We have found that disruption of the anti-cancer circadian hormone melatonin (MLT) by light at night can significantly enhance the metastatic potential in breast cancer cells. Our work supports the report of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that shift work is a “probable human carcinogen” and highlights the association between exposure to light at night and invasive breast cancer. We recently reported that human breast tumor xenografts grown in athymic nude female rats housed in a photoperiod of 12h light at day: 12h dim light at night (dLAN, 0.2 lux – blocks the nighttime circadian MLT signal), display resistance to doxorubicin (Dox). More importantly, tumor growth and drug resistance could be blocked by the administration of Dox in circadian alignment with nocturnal MLT during dLAN. Our recent preliminary studies show that poorly invasive ERα positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, when injected into the tibia (to mimic bone metastatic disease) of Foxn1nu athymic nude mice (which produce a strong circadian nighttime melatonin signal) housed in a dLAN photoperiod (suppressed nocturnal MLT production) developed full blown breast cancer tumors in bone (P<0.05) that are highly osteolytic (P<0.05). Moreover, patients with metastatic breast cancer are routinely treated with doxorubicin, which itself can promote bone damage. Our studies demonstrate that MLT slows the growth of metastatic breast cancer in bone but that the chrono-therapeutic use of doxorubicin in circadian alignment with melatonin in Foxn1nu mice with tibial breast tumors, reduced tumor growth in bone, reduced bone erosion, and promoted the formation of new bone. Successful use of this chronotherapeutic use of Dox and MLT in clinical trials increasing efficacy in preventing or suppressing breast cancer metastasis to bone while decreasing toxic side effects of doxorubicin would provide a revolutionary advancement in the treatment of bone metastatic breast cancer and decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer metastasis to bone.  
  Address Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 2472-1972 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2433  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: