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Author Grove, L. pdf  url
openurl 
  Title Reducing Acadia's Light Pollution Type Manuscript
  Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Conservation; Society; Economics; Acadia National Park; Maine; benefit cost analysis; astrotourism; contingent valuation method; dark sky places; dark sky park  
  Abstract Acadia National Park is among the most visited national parks in the United States, attracting millions of people per year. Thousands of those visitors come to the park for “astro-tourism,” as Acadia has become one of the premier stargazing locations on the east coast. There remains, however, the continued threat from light pollution from the surrounding communities that negatively affects Acadia's darkness, contributing to a lesser visitor experience and potentially harming native ecosystems. Although park management and community organizations have engaged in significant efforts to decrease Acadia's nighttime light levels and raise awareness among visitors and locals regarding the importance of darkness, the park still seek to continue to decrease light pollution. This report developed policy options that could help solve the long-term policy goal of decreasing nighttime lighting levels within and around Acadia while also using the International Dark-Sky Association's Dark-Sky Park designation requirements as a reasonable, short-term policy benchmark.

Working within existing organizations, the policy options crafted to address Acadia’s nighttime lighting levels were analyzed both qualitatively through a criteria evaluation and quantitatively through a Benefit Cost Analysis.

The options included 1) the formation of a Darkness Coalition within the League of Towns, 2) a reimagining of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute Dark-Sky Project into the Dark-Sky Taskforce, 3) the creation of a Lighting Consultant position paid through the Friends of Acadia Wild Acadia initiative, and 4) the combination of Coalition and the Taskforce into the League of Towns – Dark-Sky Partnership (LOT-DSP). The report recommends the adoption of Option 4 – the creation of the LOT – DSP. While this option does not provide the greatest estimated monetary net value compared to the Status Quo in the quantitative evaluation, it still provides an estimated benefit of about $105 million over the course of five years and is the strongest option in the qualitative analysis. The LOT – DSP provides the best opportunity for Acadia to achieve legitimate and long-lasting nighttime light level reduction.
 
  Address Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, Garrett Hall, 235 McCormick Road, P.O. Box 400893, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4893 USA; locher.grove(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis  
  Publisher University of Virginia Place of Publication Charlottesville Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN (up) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1449  
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Author Petrželková, K. J.; Downs, N. C.; Zukal, J.; Racey, P. A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A comparison between emergence and return activity in pipistrelle bats Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Acta Chiropterologica Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 381-390  
  Keywords animals; fying mammals: animal behaviour  
  Abstract Bats may be vulnerable to predation during evening emergence and morning return to their roosts. Early emergence increases the risk of exposure to raptorial birds, but emerging late confers a risk of missing the dusk peak of aerial insects. Here, both emergence and return activity was studied in detail at the same roosts for the first time. We investigated six maternity colonies of pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus) in NE Scotland and recorded light levels and time of emergence and return of the bats with respect to sunset and sunrise on the same nights. Parameters of return activity generally occurred at lower light intensities than those of emergence. Therefore, the interval between dawn return and sunrise was generally longer than that between sunset and dusk emergence. Emergence and return were equal in duration. Bats clustered more on emergence in comparison with return during pregnancy and lactation, whereas during postlactation this trend was reversed.  
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  Publisher BioOne Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1598  
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Author Villamizar, N.; García-Alcazar, A.; Sánchez-Vázquez, F. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of light spectrum and photoperiod on the growth, development and survival of European sea bass (Dicentrarchuslabrax) larvae Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 292 Issue 1-2 Pages 80-86  
  Keywords animals; fish; light spectrum; photoperiod  
  Abstract This study investigates how the characteristics (spectrum and photoperiod) of artificial light affect European sea bass eggs and larvae from &#8722; 1 to 40 days post-hatching. Fertilised eggs and larvae were reared under five different light treatments: 12L:12D red light (LDR; half-peak bandwidth = 641–718 nm), 12L:12D blue light (LDB; half-peak bandwidth = 435–500 nm), 12L:12D broad-spectrum white light (LDW; 367 < &#955; < 1057 nm), 24L:0D broad-spectrum white light (LL) and 0L:24D (DD). The results showed that total length at day post-hatching 40 was significantly larger in larvae reared under LDB (15.4 ± 0.6 mm) and LL (15.2 ± 0.6 mm) than in larvae reared under LDR (11.7 ± 0.7 mm). Overall wet weight was highest under LDB (21.6 ± 2.02 mgr) and lowest in LDR larvae (13.6 ± 1.48 mgr). Yolk sac and oil globule absorption occurred more slowly in LDR and DD larvae, while LDB larvae developed their fin, teeth and swim bladder significantly earlier than the rest of the groups. DD larvae were unable to capture food and mortality was 100% by day post-hatching 18, while LDR larvae did not feed on rotifers, but fed on Artemia from day post-hatching 16 onwards. The best survival was obtained with the LL treatment, although significantly more problems with swim bladder development and lower jaw malformations were also identified in this group. In summary, these results highlight the key role of the light spectrum and photoperiod for European sea bass larvae, the best performance being achieved under the light conditions that best approached those of their natural aquatic environment (LDB). These findings should be considered when designing rearing protocols for larvae in aquaculture.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1606  
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Author Alessandro Manfrin, Gabriel Singer, Stefano Larsen, Nadine Weiss, Roy H. A. van Grunsven, Nina-Sophie Weiss, Stefanie Wohlfahrt, Michael T. Monaghan and Franz Hölker url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night affects organism flux across ecosystem boundaries and drives community structure in the recipient ecosystem Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Frontiers in Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 61 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread alteration of the natural environment that can affect the functioning of ecosystems. ALAN can change the movement patterns of freshwater animals that move into the adjacent riparian and terrestrial ecosystems, but the implications for local riparian consumers that rely on these subsidies are still unexplored. We conducted a two-year field experiment to quantify changes of freshwater-terrestrial linkages by installing streetlights in a previously light-native riparian area adjacent to an agricultural drainage ditch. We compared the abundance and community composition of emerging aquatic insects, flying insects, and ground-dwelling arthropods with an unlit control site. Comparisons were made within and between years using generalized least squares and a BACI design (Before-After Control-Impact). Aquatic insect emergence, the proportion of flying insects that were aquatic in origin, and the total abundance of flying insects all increased in the ALAN-illuminated area. The abundance of several night-active ground-dwelling predators (Pachygnatha clercki, Trochosa sp., Opiliones) increased under ALAN and their activity was extended into the day. Conversely, the abundance of nocturnal ground beetles (Carabidae) decreased under ALAN. The changes in composition of riparian predator and scavenger communities suggest that the increase in aquatic-to-terrestrial subsidy flux may cascade through the riparian food web. The work is among the first studies to experimentally manipulate ALAN using a large-scale field experiment, and provides evidence that ALAN can affect processes that link adjacent ecosystems. Given the large number of streetlights that are installed along shorelines of freshwater bodies throughout the globe, the effects could be widespread and represent an underestimated source of impairment for both aquatic and riparian systems.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1746  
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Author Albreiki, Mohammed S. url  openurl
  Title The effects of light at night and/or melatonin on hormones, metabo- lites, appetite control, vascular function, and behavioural responses. Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication University of Surrey Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Light at night (LAN) is a major factor in disruption of SCN function, including melatonin suppression. Melatonin has been linked to a variety of biological processes such as lipid and glucose metabolism, vascular parameters, appetite, and behaviour. However, few human studies have investigated the effect of LAN and suppressed melatonin prior to and after an evening meal. The current thesis aims to investigate the impact of light at night and/or mela- tonin on hormones, metabolites, appetite, vascular function, and behaviour prior to and after an evening test meal in healthy participants. The first study investigated the effect of dim or bright light conditions on hor- mones, metabolites, appetite, vascular function and behavioural responses. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were reduced, lipid profiles altered and salivary melatonin suppressed under bright light compared to dim light conditions. Subjec- tive mood was improved and appetite scores increased in bright light. No differences were seen in vascular parameters. Although clear differences were apparent it could not be determined whether the effects were due to the light at night, the absence of melatonin or a combination of the two. The second study involved three conditions with the administration of exogenous melatonin 90 mins before the evening test meal under bright and dim light conditions compared to bright light alone with the consequent melatonin suppression. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were reduced and lipid profile altered in bright light when melatonin was suppressed compared to the two conditions with exogenous melatonin. Mood was improved and appetite increased with lower leptin levels and elevated wrist temperature with bright light and suppressed melatonin. Statistical analysis showed that the major effects were due to melatonin. These studies demonstrate a possible role for melatonin in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism when eating late at night which may have implications for shift-workers.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1747  
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