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Author Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, D.; He, X.; Jendryke, M.
Title A preliminary investigation of Luojia-1 night-time light imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Letters Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Letters
Volume 10 Issue (down) 6 Pages 526-535
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Launched on 2 June 2018, Luojia-1 satellite records night-time light imagery at 130 m resolution, which is higher than most of the existing night-time light images to date. This study evaluated radiometric and spatial properties of the Luojia-1 satellite imagery for cities of Los Angeles, Wuhan and Rome as well as the change detection capability for Zunyi city. For the radiometric property, the analysis shows that the Luojia-1 images correlate well with the radiance of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)’s Day and Night Band (DNB), and that the Luojia-1 images have a wider range of radiance values, as well as higher radiance values (e.g., 40%–90% higher) than the VIIRS DNB images. Using wavelet decomposition and change detection analysis to evaluate spatial property and change detection capability, it was found that the Luojia-1 images provide abundant spatial detail information, with about 20%–54% energy of wavelet component of the images stored in 100–400 m resolutions, and they can help to track the electrification of new roads and buildings at a fine resolution. This study shows that the Luojia-1 images are an effective data source for analysing spatiotemporal distribution of night-time light and its associated socioeconomic attributes.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-704X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2199
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Author Farghly, M.F.A.; Mahrose, K.M.; Rehman, Z.U.; Yu, S.; Abdelfattah, M.G.; El-Garhy, O.H.
Title Intermittent lighting regime as a tool to enhance egg production and eggshell thickness in Rhode Island Red laying hens Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Poultry Science Abbreviated Journal Poult Sci
Volume 98 Issue (down) 6 Pages 2459–2465
Keywords Animals
Abstract Influences of intermittent light regime as a tool to enhance egg production, egg quality, and blood parameters of laying hens were investigated. A total of 270 hens of Rhode Island Red (during 20 to 36 wk of age) were used to investigate the effects of intermittent light regime in completely randomized design. The birds were divided into 3 equal groups (6 replicates of 15 birds each) and housed in floor pens. The first group was served as non-treated control (C) and was exposed to continuous and constant light for 16 h light/day throughout the experimental period. Whereas, birds of the other groups were exposed to intermittent lights for 20 min/h + 40 min of constant light (T1; FLASH20) and 40 min/h + 20 min of constant light (T2; FLASH40) during the 16 h of light period. Hens of T1 group showed significantly (P </= 0.05) the highest concentration of total antioxidant capacity and the lowest one of malondialdehyde in comparison with the other groups. Hens of T1 group had significantly (P </= 0.05) the greatest egg laying rate and egg mass in comparison with the other counterparts. Feed consumption was similar in the groups under study. Hens exposed to FLASH20 had the lowest (P </= 0.05) FCR when compared with the other treatments. Eggs produced from hens exposed to FLASH20 had the highest value of shell thickness followed by the control and then that of those exposed to FLASH40. There were insignificant differences among the treatments in body weight of hens and all of other egg quality and egg problem traits. In conclusion, intermittent light regime of 20 min/h was the most efficient in comparison with the other ones. Finally, intermittent light regime of 20 min/h during laying period (during 20 to 36 wk of age) is highly recommended.
Address Animal Production Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Benha University, Qalubia, Egypt
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0032-5791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30715501 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2206
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Author Nelson, J.A.; Bugbee, B.
Title Economic analysis of greenhouse lighting: light emitting diodes vs. high intensity discharge fixtures Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 9 Issue (down) 6 Pages e99010
Keywords Plants
Abstract Lighting technologies for plant growth are improving rapidly, providing numerous options for supplemental lighting in greenhouses. Here we report the photosynthetic (400-700 nm) photon efficiency and photon distribution pattern of two double-ended HPS fixtures, five mogul-base HPS fixtures, ten LED fixtures, three ceramic metal halide fixtures, and two fluorescent fixtures. The two most efficient LED and the two most efficient double-ended HPS fixtures had nearly identical efficiencies at 1.66 to 1.70 micromoles per joule. These four fixtures represent a dramatic improvement over the 1.02 micromoles per joule efficiency of the mogul-base HPS fixtures that are in common use. The best ceramic metal halide and fluorescent fixtures had efficiencies of 1.46 and 0.95 micromoles per joule, respectively. We also calculated the initial capital cost of fixtures per photon delivered and determined that LED fixtures cost five to ten times more than HPS fixtures. The five-year electric plus fixture cost per mole of photons is thus 2.3 times higher for LED fixtures, due to high capital costs. Compared to electric costs, our analysis indicates that the long-term maintenance costs are small for both technologies. If widely spaced benches are a necessary part of a production system, the unique ability of LED fixtures to efficiently focus photons on specific areas can be used to improve the photon capture by plant canopies. Our analysis demonstrates, however, that the cost per photon delivered is higher in these systems, regardless of fixture category. The lowest lighting system costs are realized when an efficient fixture is coupled with effective canopy photon capture.
Address Crop Physiology Laboratory, Department of Plant Soils and Climate, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, United States of America
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24905835; PMCID:PMC4048233 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2233
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Author Bará, S.; Tapia, C.; Zamorano, J.
Title Absolute Radiometric Calibration of TESS-W and SQM Night Sky Brightness Sensors Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sensors Abbreviated Journal Sensors
Volume 19 Issue (down) 6 Pages 1336
Keywords Instrumentation; calibration; SQM; TESS; photometer; sky brightness
Abstract We develop a general optical model and describe the absolute radiometric calibration of the readings provided by two widely-used night sky brightness sensors based on irradiance-to-frequency conversion. The calibration involves the precise determination of the overall spectral sensitivity of the devices and also the constant G relating the output frequency of the light-to-frequency converter chip to the actual band-weighted and field-of-view averaged spectral radiance incident on the detector (brightness). From these parameters, we show how to define a rigorous astronomical absolute photometric system in which the sensor measurements can be reported in units of magnitudes per square arcsecond with precise physical meaning.
Address Departmento Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2263
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Author Daugaard, S.; Markvart, J.; Bonde, J.P.; Christoffersen, J.; Garde, A.H.; Hansen, A.M.; Schlunssen, V.; Vestergaard, J.M.; Vistisen, H.T.; Kolstad, H.A.
Title Light Exposure during Days with Night, Outdoor, and Indoor Work Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Annals of Work Exposures and Health Abbreviated Journal Ann Work Expo Health
Volume 63 Issue (down) 6 Pages 651–665
Keywords Human Health; Shift work; melatonin suppression; mood disorders
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess light exposure during days with indoor, outdoor, and night work and days off work. METHODS: Light intensity was continuously recorded for 7 days across the year among indoor (n = 170), outdoor (n = 151), and night workers (n = 188) in Denmark (55-56 degrees N) equipped with a personal light recorder. White light intensity, duration above 80, 1000, and 2500 lux, and proportion of red, green, and blue light was depicted by time of the day and season for work days and days off work. RESULTS: Indoor workers' average light exposure only intermittently exceeded 1000 lux during daytime working hours in summer and never in winter. During daytime working hours, most outdoor workers exceeded 2500 lux in summer and 1000 lux in winter. Night workers spent on average 10-50 min >80 lux when working night shifts. During days off work, indoor and night workers were exposed to higher light intensities than during work days and few differences were seen between indoor, outdoor, and night workers. The spectral composition of light was similar for indoor, outdoor, and night workers during days at and off work. CONCLUSION: The night workers of this study were during night hours on average exposed for a limited time to light intensities expected to suppress melatonin. The indoor workers were exposed to light levels during daylight hours that may reduce general well-being and mood, especially in winter. Outdoor workers were during summer daylight hours exposed to light levels comparable to those used for the treatment of depression.
Address Department of Occupational Medicine, Danish Ramazinni Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, 8200 Aarhus, Denmark
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2398-7308 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30865270 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2268
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