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Author Pattison, P.M.; Tsao, J.Y.; Brainard, G.C.; Bugbee, B.
Title LEDs for photons, physiology and food Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 563 Issue (down) 7732 Pages 493-500
Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Plants; Review
Abstract Lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) not only is more energy efficient than traditional lighting, but also enables improved performance and control. The colour, intensity and distribution of light can now be controlled with unprecedented precision, enabling light to be used both as a signal for specific physiological responses in humans and plants, and as an efficient fuel for fresh food production. Here we show how a broad and improved understanding of the physiological responses to light will facilitate greater energy savings and provide health and productivity benefits that have not previously been associated with lighting.
Address Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30464269 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2110
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Author Bissonnette, T.H.
Title Modification of Mammalian Sexual Cycles; Reactions of Ferrets (Putorius vulgaris) of Both Sexes to Electric Light Added After Dark in November and December Type Journal Article
Year 1932 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume 110 Issue (down) 767 Pages 322-336
Keywords Animals
Abstract Studies by Rowan (1930 and preceding papers) and Bissonnette (1931, a, b, 1932, a, b, and preceding papers) and Bissonnette and Wadlund (1931) have shown that in juncos, canaries, crows and starlings, at least, among birds, the sexual cycle is conditioned to a great degree by daily light ration. Sexual activity in both males and females can be modified at will by altering the daily light ration with controlled electric lighting from ordinary incandescent bulbs. Gonad changes, controllable in this way, are closely correlated with migrations in juncos and crows, as demonstrated by Rowan (1930, and preceding papers), who, however, maintains that it is the added periods of muscular exercise, rather than the light, as such, that condition these changes, in spite of the fact that it is always the added light he uses, rather than exercise, to get his effects. Bissonnette disagrees, and holds it is the light that is the major factor in conditioning the changes in sexual cycles. It has been found, also, that intensity and colour, or wave-length, as well as daily period of light are factors in conditioning sexual activity in starlings, and the method of increase of light also plays a part (Bissonnette, 1931, b, 1932 ; Bissonnette and Wadlund, 1931).
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2389
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Author Dias, K.S.; Dosso, E.S.; Hall, A.S.; Schuch, A.P.; Tozetti, A.M.
Title Ecological light pollution affects anuran calling season, daily calling period, and sensitivity to light in natural Brazilian wetlands Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Science of Nature Abbreviated Journal Sci Nat
Volume 106 Issue (down) 7-8 Pages 46
Keywords Animals
Abstract Ecological light pollution alters an environment's light cycle, potentially affecting photoperiod-controlled behavior. Anurans, for example, generally breed nocturnally, and the influence of light pollution on their natural history may therefore be especially strong. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by measuring male calling behavior of anuran communities in natural wetlands in southern Brazil exposed or not exposed to street lights. We recorded seasonal and diel calling activity and calling response to a light pulse. The peak calling season differed between continuously lit and unlit locations with most species in illuminated wetlands shortening their calling season and calling earlier in the year. In unlit breeding sites, Boana pulchella, Pseudis minuta, and Pseudopaludicola falcipes confined their calling activity to well-defined hours of the night, but in continuously lit areas, these species called more continuously through the night. A 2-minute light pulse inhibited calling, but only in unlit wetlands. After a light pulse, frogs quickly resumed calling-suggesting acclimatization to brief artificial light exposure. Our field experiment presents a convincing example of ecological light pollution showing that artificial light alters the seasonal and diel calling time of some South American wetland anurans. It also documents their acclimatization to brief lighting when being continuously exposed to light.
Address Laboratorio de Ecologia de Vertebrados Terrestres, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos – UNISINOS, Campus Sao Leopoldo, Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, 93020-190, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-1042 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31280391 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2560
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Author LeGates, T.A.; Fernandez, D.C.; Hattar, S.
Title Light as a central modulator of circadian rhythms, sleep and affect Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Nature Reviews. Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Neurosci
Volume 15 Issue (down) 7 Pages 443-454
Keywords Human Health; photobiology; circadian disruption; asynchronization; sleep; mood; Review
Abstract Light has profoundly influenced the evolution of life on earth. As widely appreciated, light enables us to generate images of our environment. However, light – through intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) – also influences behaviours that are essential for our health and quality of life but are independent of image formation. These include the synchronization of the circadian clock to the solar day, tracking of seasonal changes and the regulation of sleep. Irregular light environments lead to problems in circadian rhythms and sleep, which eventually cause mood and learning deficits. Recently, it was found that irregular light can also directly affect mood and learning without producing major disruptions in circadian rhythms and sleep. In this Review, we discuss the indirect and direct influence of light on mood and learning, and provide a model for how light, the circadian clock and sleep interact to influence mood and cognitive functions.
Address 1] Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biology, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA. [2] Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neuroscience, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-003X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24917305 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 299
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Author Lee, J.G.-H.; MacGregor-Fors, I.; Yeh, P.J.
Title Sunrise in the city: disentangling drivers of the avian dawn chorus onset in urban greenspaces Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol
Volume 48 Issue (down) 7 Pages 955-964
Keywords Animals
Abstract Urban systems are known to have a number of effects on avian diversity, density, and morphological and behavioral traits. However, no study to date has simultaneously examined the wide range of urban variables in relation to the avian dawn chorus, a complex behavioral phenomenon. Previous studies investigating adjustments of the dawn chorus onset in urban settings have mainly been confined to relationships with noise and light levels. In addition to noise and light levels, in this study we included other potentially related environmental characteristics describing vegetation structure, urban infrastructure, and human activity, all of which have been shown to be drivers of bird diversity in urban areas. We conducted dawn chorus surveys at 38 Los Angeles urban greenspaces and used a classification and regression tree analysis to identify specific urban scenarios that best explained timing differences in the dawn chorus onset. Our results show that light level was the most important determinant of the dawn chorus onset time, in which, counter-intuitively, bird communities in greenspaces with higher light levels had later onsets. In addition, noise was an important factor for the chorus onset in greenspaces with higher light levels. Although our results differ from those of previous studies, these findings highlight the importance of noise and light levels in explaining dawn chorus onset variation, indicating the need for further research in untangling this complex and ecologically important phenomenon.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1623
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