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Author Gaston, K.J.
Title Lighting up the nighttime Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 362 Issue (down) 6416 Pages 744-746
Keywords Commentary
Abstract Among the most visually compelling images of the whole Earth have been those created using data obtained at night by astronauts or from satellites. The proliferation in use of electric lighting—including from industrial, commercial, municipal, and domestic sources—is striking. It sketches the spatial distribution of much of the human population, outlining a substantial proportion of the world's coastline, highlighting a multitude of towns and cities, and drawing the major highways that connect them. The data embodied in these nighttime images have been used to estimate and map levels of energy use, urbanization, and economic activity. They have also been key in focusing attention on the environmental impacts of the artificial light at night itself. Explicit steps need to be taken to limit these impacts, which vary according to the intensity, spectrum, spatial extent, and temporal dynamics of this lighting.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK. k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30442788 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2058
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Author Alessandro Manfrin, Gabriel Singer, Stefano Larsen, Nadine Weiss, Roy H. A. van Grunsven, Nina-Sophie Weiss, Stefanie Wohlfahrt, Michael T. Monaghan and Franz Hölker
Title Artificial light at night affects organism flux across ecosystem boundaries and drives community structure in the recipient ecosystem Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Frontiers in Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue (down) 61 Pages
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread alteration of the natural environment that can affect the functioning of ecosystems. ALAN can change the movement patterns of freshwater animals that move into the adjacent riparian and terrestrial ecosystems, but the implications for local riparian consumers that rely on these subsidies are still unexplored. We conducted a two-year field experiment to quantify changes of freshwater-terrestrial linkages by installing streetlights in a previously light-native riparian area adjacent to an agricultural drainage ditch. We compared the abundance and community composition of emerging aquatic insects, flying insects, and ground-dwelling arthropods with an unlit control site. Comparisons were made within and between years using generalized least squares and a BACI design (Before-After Control-Impact). Aquatic insect emergence, the proportion of flying insects that were aquatic in origin, and the total abundance of flying insects all increased in the ALAN-illuminated area. The abundance of several night-active ground-dwelling predators (Pachygnatha clercki, Trochosa sp., Opiliones) increased under ALAN and their activity was extended into the day. Conversely, the abundance of nocturnal ground beetles (Carabidae) decreased under ALAN. The changes in composition of riparian predator and scavenger communities suggest that the increase in aquatic-to-terrestrial subsidy flux may cascade through the riparian food web. The work is among the first studies to experimentally manipulate ALAN using a large-scale field experiment, and provides evidence that ALAN can affect processes that link adjacent ecosystems. Given the large number of streetlights that are installed along shorelines of freshwater bodies throughout the globe, the effects could be widespread and represent an underestimated source of impairment for both aquatic and riparian systems.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1746
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Author Bharti, N.; Tatem, A.J.; Ferrari, M.J.; Grais, R.F.; Djibo, A.; Grenfell, B.T.
Title Explaining seasonal fluctuations of measles in Niger using nighttime lights imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 334 Issue (down) 6061 Pages 1424-1427
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Cities; Emigration and Immigration; Epidemics; *Epidemiologic Methods; Humans; Light; Measles/*epidemiology/transmission; Niger/epidemiology; *Population Density; Remote Sensing Technology; *Seasons; Spacecraft
Abstract Measles epidemics in West Africa cause a significant proportion of vaccine-preventable childhood mortality. Epidemics are strongly seasonal, but the drivers of these fluctuations are poorly understood, which limits the predictability of outbreaks and the dynamic response to immunization. We show that measles seasonality can be explained by spatiotemporal changes in population density, which we measure by quantifying anthropogenic light from satellite imagery. We find that measles transmission and population density are highly correlated for three cities in Niger. With dynamic epidemic models, we demonstrate that measures of population density are essential for predicting epidemic progression at the city level and improving intervention strategies. In addition to epidemiological applications, the ability to measure fine-scale changes in population density has implications for public health, crisis management, and economic development.
Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. nbharti@princeton.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22158822; PMCID:PMC3891598 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2770
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Author Garstang, R.H.
Title Model for Artificial Night-Sky Illumination. Type Journal Article
Year 1986 Publication Publ Astron Soc Pac Abbreviated Journal
Volume 98 Issue (down) 601 Pages 364-375
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract A model has been constructed to allow calculation of the night-sky brightness caused by a city at its center and outside the city, and at arbitrary zenith distances. A circular city of uniform brightness is assumed, with the total brightness proportional to the population. Molecular scattering and aerosol scattering are included, with the amount of aerosols being an adjustable parameter, and different scale heights being adopted for molecules and aerosols. The reflectivity of the ground and the fraction of light radiated above the horizontal are taken as parameters. Applications are given to several cities, to the general population-distance relations, to brightness-distance relations, and to the city center brightness-population relations
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 560
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Author Davies, T.W.; Duffy, J.P.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title The nature, extent, and ecological implications of marine light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Volume 12 Issue (down) 6 Pages 347-355
Keywords Ecology; light pollution; oceans; marine; ecology; ecosystem; Review
Abstract Despite centuries of use, artificial light at night has only recently been recognized as a cause for environmental concern. Its global extent and ongoing encroachment into naturally lit ecosystems has sparked scientific interest into the many ways in which it may negatively affect human health, societal attitudes, scientific endeavors, and biological processes. Yet, perhaps because sources of artificial light are largely land based, the potential for artificial light pollution to interfere with the biology of the ocean has not been explored in any detail. There is little information on how light pollution affects those species, behaviors, and interactions that are informed by the intensity, spectra, and periodicity of natural nighttime light in marine ecosystems. Here, we provide an overview of the extent of marine light pollution, discuss how it changes the physical environment, and explore its potential role in shaping marine ecosystems.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Cornwall, UK
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 365
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