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Author Rumanova, V.S.; Okuliarova, M.; Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Zeman, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Consequences of low-intensity light at night on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal Can J Physiol Pharmacol  
  Volume 97 Issue (down) 9 Pages 863-871  
  Keywords Animals; mouse models  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms are an inherent property of physiological processes and can be disturbed by irregular environmental cycles, including artificial light at night (ALAN). Circadian disruption may contribute to many pathologies, such as hypertension, obesity and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Our study investigated the consequences of ALAN on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which represent an animal model of essential hypertension and insulin resistance. Adult males were exposed to a light (L)/dark (D) cycle of 12:12 h and the ALAN group experienced dim light at night (1-2 lux), either for 2 or 5 weeks. Rats on ALAN showed a loss of LD variability for systolic blood pressure (SysBP), but not for heart rate. Moreover, a gradual increase of SysBP was recorded over 5 weeks of ALAN. Exposure to ALAN increased plasma insulin and hepatic triglyceride levels. An increased expression of metabolic transcription factors, Pparalpha and Ppar, in the epididymal fat and a decreased expression of Glut4 in the heart was found in the ALAN group. Our results demonstrate that low-intensity ALAN can disturb BP control and augment insulin resistance in SHR, and may represent a serious risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases.  
  Address Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Animal Physiology and Ethology , Ilkovicova 6 , Slovakia , Bratislava, Slovakia, Slovakia , 84215 ; mzeman@fns.uniba.sk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-4212 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31251886 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2567  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kaplan, K.A.; Mashash, M.; Williams, R.; Batchelder, H.; Starr-Glass, L.; Zeitzer, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Light Flashes vs Sham Therapy During Sleep With Adjunct Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Sleep Quality Among Adolescents: A Randomized Clinical Trial Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication JAMA Network Open Abbreviated Journal JAMA Netw Open  
  Volume 2 Issue (down) 9 Pages e1911944  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Importance: Owing to biological, behavioral, and societal factors, sleep duration in teenagers is often severely truncated, leading to pervasive sleep deprivation. Objective: To determine whether a novel intervention, using both light exposure during sleep and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), would increase total sleep time in teenagers by enabling them to go to sleep earlier than usual. Design, Setting, and Participants: This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, conducted between November 1, 2013, and May 31, 2016, among 102 adolescents enrolled full-time in grades 9 to 12, who expressed difficulty going to bed earlier and waking up early enough, was composed of 2 phases. In phase 1, participants were assigned to receive either 3 weeks of light or sham therapy and were asked to try to go to sleep earlier. In phase 2, participants received 4 brief CBT sessions in addition to a modified light or sham therapy. All analyses were performed on an intent-to-treat basis. Interventions: Light therapy consisted of receiving a 3-millisecond light flash every 20 seconds during the final 3 hours of sleep (phase 1) or final 2 hours of sleep (phase 2). Sham therapy used an identical device, but delivered 1 minute of light pulses (appearing in 20-second intervals, for a total of 3 pulses) per hour during the final 3 hours of sleep (phase 1) or 2 hours of sleep (phase 2). Light therapy occurred every night during the 4-week intervention. Cognitive behavioral therapy consisted of four 50-minute in-person sessions once per week. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcome measures included diary-based sleep times, momentary ratings of evening sleepiness, and subjective measures of sleepiness and sleep quality. Results: Among the 102 participants (54 female [52.9%]; mean [SD] age, 15.6 [1.1] years), 72 were enrolled in phase 1 and 30 were enrolled in phase 2. Mixed-effects models revealed that light therapy alone was inadequate in changing the timing of sleep. However, compared with sham therapy plus CBT alone, light therapy plus CBT significantly moved sleep onset a mean (SD) of 50.1 (27.5) minutes earlier and increased nightly total sleep time by a mean (SD) of 43.3 (35.0) minutes. Light therapy plus CBT also resulted in a 7-fold greater increase in bedtime compliance than that observed among participants receiving sham plus CBT (mean [SD], 2.21 [3.91] vs 0.29 [0.76]), as well as a mean 0.55-point increase in subjective evening sleepiness as compared with a mean 0.48-point decrease in participants receiving sham plus CBT as measured on a 7-point sleepiness scale. Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that light exposure during sleep, in combination with a brief, motivation-focused CBT intervention, was able to consistently move bedtimes earlier and increase total sleep time in teenagers. This type of passive light intervention in teenagers may lead to novel therapeutic applications. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01406691.  
  Address Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2574-3805 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31553469 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2683  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaughan, A. E., Oda, T., Sorichetta, A., Stevens, F. R., Bondarenko, M., Bun, R., Krauser, L., Yetman, G., & Nghiem, S. V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluating nighttime lights and population distribution as proxies for mapping anthropogenic CO2 emission in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue (down) 9 Pages 091006  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; greenhouse gas emissions; GHG; Asia; Vietnam; Cambodia; Laos; nighttime light  
  Abstract Tracking spatiotemporal changes in GHG emissions is key to successful implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). And while emission inventories often provide a robust tool to track emission trends at the country level, subnational emission estimates are often not reported or reports vary in robustness as the estimates are often dependent on the spatial modeling approach and ancillary data used to disaggregate the emission inventories. Assessing the errors and uncertainties of the subnational emission estimates is fundamentally challenging due to the lack of physical measurements at the subnational level. To begin addressing the current performance of modeled gridded CO2 emissions, this study compares two common proxies used to disaggregate CO2 emission estimates. We use a known gridded CO2 model based on satellite-observed nighttime light (NTL) data (Open Source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, ODIAC) and a gridded population dataset driven by a set of ancillary geospatial data. We examine the association at multiple spatial scales of these two datasets for three countries in Southeast Asia: Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and characterize the spatiotemporal similarities and differences for 2000, 2005, and 2010. We specifically highlight areas of potential uncertainty in the ODIAC model, which relies on the single use of NTL data for disaggregation of the non-point emissions estimates. Results show, over time, how a NTL-based emissions disaggregation tends to concentrate CO2 estimates in different ways than population-based estimates at the subnational level. We discuss important considerations in the disconnect between the two modeled datasets and argue that the spatial differences between data products can be useful to identify areas affected by the errors and uncertainties associated with the NTL-based downscaling in a region with uneven urbanization rates.  
  Address University of Louisville, Department of Geography and Geosciences, Louisville, KY, United States of America; ae.gaughan(at)louisville.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2727  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rumanova, V.S.; Okuliarova, M.; Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Zeman, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Consequences of low-intensity light at night on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats (1) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal Can J Physiol Pharmacol  
  Volume 97 Issue (down) 9 Pages 863-871  
  Keywords Animals; Ppar; blood pressure; circadian; circadien; insulin resistance; metabolism; metabolisme; recepteurs actives par les proliferateurs de peroxysomes; resistance a l'insuline; tension arterielle  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms are an inherent property of physiological processes and can be disturbed by irregular environmental cycles, including artificial light at night (ALAN). Circadian disruption may contribute to many pathologies, such as hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Our study investigated the consequences of ALAN on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats, which represent an animal model of essential hypertension and insulin resistance. Adult males were exposed to a 12 h light – 12 h dark cycle and the ALAN group experienced dim light at night (1-2 lx), either for 2 or 5 weeks. Rats on ALAN showed a loss of light-dark variability for systolic blood pressure, but not for heart rate. Moreover, a gradual increase of systolic blood pressure was recorded over 5 weeks of ALAN. Exposure to ALAN increased plasma insulin and hepatic triglyceride levels. An increased expression of metabolic transcription factors, Pparalpha and Ppargamma, in the epididymal fat and a decreased expression of Glut4 in the heart was found in the ALAN group. Our results demonstrate that low-intensity ALAN can disturb blood pressure control and augment insulin resistance in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and may represent a serious risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases.  
  Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-4212 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31251886 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2811  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sánchez, S. F.; Aceituno, J.; Thiele, U.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Alves, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Night Sky at the Calar Alto Observatory Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Publ Astron Soc Pac  
  Volume 119 Issue (down) 860 Pages 1186-1200  
  Keywords Skyglow, Darkness  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1131  
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