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Author Bullock, B.; McGlashan, E.M.; Burns, A.C.; Lu, B.S.; Cain, S.W.
Title Traits related to bipolar disorder are associated with an increased post-illumination pupil response Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Psychiatry Research Abbreviated Journal Psychiatry Res
Volume 278 Issue (up) Pages 35-41
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Mood states in bipolar disorder appear to be closely linked to changes in sleep and circadian function. It has been suggested that hypersensitivity of the circadian system to light may be a trait vulnerability for bipolar disorder. Healthy persons with emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder also appear to exhibit problems with circadian rhythms, which may be associated with individual differences in light sensitivity. This study investigated the melanopsin-driven post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) in relation to emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder (measured with the General Behavior Inventory) in a non-clinical group (n=61). An increased PIPR was associated with increased bipolar disorder-related traits. Specifically, the hypomania scale of the General Behavior Inventory was associated with an increased post-blue PIPR. Further, both the full hypomania and shortened '7 Up' scales were significantly predicted by PIPR, after age, sex and depressive traits were controlled. These findings suggest that increased sensitivity to light may be a risk factor for mood problems in the general population, and support the idea that hypersensitivity to light is a trait vulnerability for, rather than symptom of, bipolar disorder.
Address School of Psychological Sciences and Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: sean.cain@monash.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0165-1781 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31136914 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2510
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Author Shen, J.; Tower, J.
Title Effects of light on aging and longevity Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ageing Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Ageing Res Rev
Volume 53 Issue (up) Pages 100913
Keywords Human Health; Review; Aging; longevity
Abstract Increasing evidence suggests an important role for light in regulation of aging and longevity. UV radiation is a mutagen that can promote aging and decrease longevity. In contrast, NIR light has shown protective effects in animal disease models. In invertebrates, visible light can shorten or extend lifespan, depending on the intensity and wavelength composition. Visible light also impacts human health, including retina function, sleep, cancer and psychiatric disorders. Possible mechanisms of visible light include: controlling circadian rhythms, inducing oxidative stress, and acting through the retina to affect neuronal circuits and systems. Changes in artificial lighting (e.g., LEDs) may have implications for human health. It will be important to further explore the mechanisms of how light affects aging and longevity, and how light affects human health.
Address Molecular and Computational Biology Program, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA 90089-2910, United States
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1568-1637 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31154014 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2514
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Author Song, J.; Tong, X.; Wang, L.; Zhao, C.; Prishchepov, A.V.
Title Monitoring finer-scale population density in urban functional zones: A remote sensing data fusion approach Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume 190 Issue (up) Pages 103580
Keywords Remote Sensing; nighttime light; numerical methods
Abstract Spatial distribution information on population density is essential for understanding urban dynamics. In recent decades, remote sensing techniques have often been applied to assess population density, particularly night-time light data (NTL). However, such attempts have resulted in mapped population density at coarse/medium resolution, which often limits the applicability of such data for fine-scale territorial planning. The improved quality and availability of multi-source remote sensing imagery and location-based service data (LBS) (from mobile networks or social media) offers new potential for providing more accurate population information at the micro-scale level. In this paper, we developed a fine-scale population distribution mapping approach by combining the functional zones (FZ) mapped with high-resolution satellite images, NTL data, and LBS data. Considering the possible variations in the relationship between population distribution and nightlight brightness in functional zones, we tested and found spatial heterogeneity of the relationship between NTL and the population density of LBS samples. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) was thus implemented to test potential improvements to the mapping accuracy. The performance of the following four models was evaluated: only ordinary least squares regression (OLS), only GWR, OLS with functional zones (OLS&FZ) and GWR with functional zones (GWR&FZ). The results showed that NTL-based GWR&FZ was the most accurate and robust approach, with an accuracy of 0.71, while the mapped population density was at a unit of 30 m spatial resolution. The detailed population density maps developed in our approach can contribute to fine-scale urban planning, healthcare and emergency responses in many parts of the world.
Address Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark; songjinchao08(at)163.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2516
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Author Huang, X., Wang, C., & Lu, J.
Title Understanding Spatiotemporal Development of Human Settlement in Hurricane-prone Areas on U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts using Nighttime Remote Sensing Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue (up) Pages 1-22
Keywords Remote Sensing; hurricanes; cyclones; Weather; natural disasters; DMSP-OLS; nighttime light; night lights; vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index; VANUI
Abstract Hurricanes, as one of the most devastating natural disasters, have posed great threats to people in coastal areas. A better understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics of human settlement in hurricane-prone areas is demanded for sustainable development. This study uses the DMSP/OLS nighttime light (NTL) data sets from 1992 to 2013 to examine human settlement development in areas with different levels of hurricane proneness. The DMSP/OLS NTL data from six satellites were intercalibrated and desaturated with AVHRR and MODIS optical imagery to derive the vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index (VANUI), a popular index that quantifies human settlement intensity. The derived VANUI time series was examined with the Mann-Kendall test and Theil-Sen test to identify significant spatiotemporal trends. To link the VANUI product to hurricane impacts, four hurricane-prone zones were extracted to represent different levels of hurricane proneness. Aside from geographic division, a wind-speed weighted track density function was developed and applied to historical North Atlantic Basin (NAB)-origin storm tracks to better categorize the four levels of hurricane proneness. Spatiotemporal patterns of human settlement in the four zones were finally analyzed. The results clearly exhibit a north-south and inland-coastal discrepancy of human settlement dynamics. This study also reveals that both the zonal extent and zonal increase rate of human settlement positively correlate with hurricane proneness levels. The intensified human settlement in high hurricane-exposure zones deserves further attention for coastal resilience.
Address Department of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, 29208, U.S.A
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2519
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Author Deng, J., Che, T., Xiao, C., Wang, S., Dai, L., & Meerzhan, A.
Title Suitability Analysis of Ski Areas in China: An Integrated Study Based on Natural and Socioeconomic Conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Cryosphere Abbreviated Journal The Cryosphere
Volume 13 Issue (up) Pages 2149–2167
Keywords Remote Sensing; China; Skiing; winter sports; GIS; Asia
Abstract The successful bidding of the 2022 Winter Olympics (Beijing 2022, officially known as the XXIV Olympic Winter Games) has greatly stimulated Chinese enthusiasm to participate in winter sports. Consequently, the Chinese ski industry is rapidly booming driven by enormous market demand and government support. However, investing in ski area at an unreasonable location will cause problems both from economic perspective (in terms of operation and management) as well as geographical concerns (such as environmental degradation). To evaluate the suitability of a ski area based on scientific 20 metrics has since become a prerequisite to the sustainable development of ski industry. In this study, we evaluate the locational suitability of ski areas in China by integrating their natural and socioeconomic conditions using linear weighted method based on geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis combined with remote sensing, online and field survey data. Key indexes for evaluating the natural suitability include snow cover, air temperature, topographic conditions, groundwater, and vegetation, whereas socioeconomic suitability is evaluated based on economic conditions, accessibility of transportation, 25 distance to tourist attractions, and distance to cities. As such, an integrated metrics considering both natural and socioeconomic suitability is defined to be a threshold and used to identify the suitability of a candidate region for ski area development. The results show that 92% of existing ski areas are located in areas with an integrated index greater than 0.5. In contrary, a ski area is considered to be a dismal prospect when the locational integrated index is less than 0.5. Finally, corresponding development strategies for decision-makers are proposed based on the multi-criteria metrics, which will be extended to incorporate potential influences from future climate change and socioeconomic development.
Address Heihe Remote Sensing Experimental Research Station, Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing of Gansu Province, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, China; chetao(at)lzb.ac.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Copernicus Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2522
Permanent link to this record