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Author Lu, H.; Liu, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatial effects of carbon dioxide emissions from residential energy consumption: A county-level study using enhanced nocturnal lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Applied Energy Abbreviated Journal Applied Energy  
  Volume 131 Issue (up) Pages 297-306  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract As the world’s largest developing country and greenhouse gas emitter, China’s residential energy consumption (REC) is now responsible for over 11% of the country’s total energy consumption. In this paper, we present a novel method that utilizes spatially distributed information from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP–OLS) and human activity index (HAI) to test the hypothesis that counties with similar carbon dioxide emissions from REC are more spatially clustered than would be expected by chance. Our results revealed a high degree of county-level clustering in the distribution of emissions per capita. However, further analysis showed that high-emission counties tended to be surrounded by counties with relatively low per capita GDP levels. Therefore, our results contrasted with other evidence that REC emissions were closely related to GDP levels. Accordingly, we stress the need for the consideration of other factors in determining emission patterns, such as residential consumption patterns (e.g., consumer choices, behavior, knowledge, and information diffusion).  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-2619 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2493  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhen, J.; Pei, T.; Xie, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Kriging methods with auxiliary nighttime lights data to detect potentially toxic metals concentrations in soil Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 659 Issue (up) Pages 363-371  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The spatial distribution of potentially toxic metals (PTMs) has been shown to be related to anthropogenic activities. Several auxiliary variables, such as those related to remote sensing data (e.g. digital elevation models, land use, and enhanced vegetation index) and soil properties (e.g. pH, soil type and cation exchange capacity), have been used to predict the spatial distribution of soil PTMs. However, these variables are mostly focused on natural processes or a single aspect of anthropogenic activities and cannot reflect the effects of integrated anthropogenic activities. Nighttime lights (NTL) images, a representative variable of integrated anthropogenic activities, may have the potential to reflect PTMs distribution. To uncover this relationship and determine the effects on evaluation precision, the NTL was employed as an auxiliary variable to map the distribution of PTMs in the United Kingdom. In this study, areas with a digital number (DN)>/=50 and an area>30km(2) were extracted from NTL images to represent regions of high-frequency anthropogenic activities. Subsequently, the distance between the sampling points and the nearest extracted area was calculated. Barium, lead, zinc, copper, and nickel concentrations exhibited the highest correlation with this distance. Their concentrations were mapped using distance as an auxiliary variable through three different kriging methods, i.e., ordinary kriging (OK), cokriging (CK), and regression kriging (RK). The accuracy of the predictions was evaluated using the leave-one-out cross validation method. Regardless of the elements, CK and RK always exhibited lower mean absolute error and root mean square error, in contrast to OK. This indicates that using the NTL as the auxiliary variable indeed enhanced the prediction accuracy for the relevant PTMs. Additionally, RK showed superior results in most cases. Hence, we recommend RK for prediction of PTMs when using the NTL as the auxiliary variable.  
  Address State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources(GPMR), Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30599355 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2494  
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Author Wilson, P.; Thums, M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Whiting, S.; Pendoley, K.; Ferreira, L.C.; Meekan, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High predation of marine turtle hatchlings near a coastal jetty Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 236 Issue (up) Pages 571-579  
  Keywords Animals; Sea turtles; marine turtles; reptiles; marine reptiles; Flatback turtle; Natator depressus; jetty  
  Abstract Growing human populations are driving the development of coastal infrastructure such as port facilities. Here, we used passive acoustic telemetry to examine the effects of a jetty and artificial light on the rates of predation of flatback turtle (Natator depressus) hatchlings as they disperse through nearshore waters. When released near a jetty, around 70% of the tagged hatchlings were predated before they could transit the nearshore, irrespective of the presence or absence of artificial light. Only 3 to 23% of hatchlings encountered predators at a second study site nearby where there was no jetty and a similar amount of nesting activity. Evidence for predation was provided by rapid tag detachment due to prey handling by a predator or the extensive movement of the tags within the receiver array suggesting that the tag (and hatchling) was inside the stomach of a predator. We found that 70% of the fish predators that consumed tags used the jetty as a refuge during the day and expanded their range along nearshore waters at night, predating on hatchlings in areas adjacent to the jetty with the highest nesting density. Sampling of potential predators including lutjanid reef fishes under the jetty revealed the presence of turtle hatchlings in their gut contents. By providing daytime refuges for predators, nearshore structures such as jetties have the potential to concentrate predators and they may pose a significant threat to populations of vulnerable species. Such effects must be taken into consideration when assessing the environmental impacts associated with these structures.  
  Address Oceans Graduate School and the UWA Oceans Institute, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Perth, Western Australia 6009, Australia; phillipa.wilson(at)research.uwa.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2496  
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Author Mpakairi, K.S.; Muvengwi, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night-time lights and their influence on summer night land surface temperature in two urban cities of Zimbabwe: A geospatial perspective Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Urban Climate Abbreviated Journal Urban Climate  
  Volume 29 Issue (up) Pages 100468  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Owing to the developments that exist in urban landscapes, urban areas experience climates that are different from their surroundings even when in the same climatic region. This is a prominent phenomenon in most urban areas and is commonly known as Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI). An understanding of some of the drivers of SUHI is imperative for cities worldwide if they endeavor to suppress the socio-economic mishaps related to extremely high UHI. In this study, we sought to explain the drivers of SUHI in two developing cities in Zimbabwe using remote sensing data. We do this through the use of a classification and regression model. The model used climate, land descriptors and anthropogenic activity data as predictor variables against summer night land surface temperature. Using the coefficient of determination (R2) and the root mean square error (RMSE) for evaluation, modelled SUHI was strongly related to actual SUHI. We also found out that night-time lights, a proxy of anthropogenic activity, contributed more to summer night surface urban heat island as compared to other variables used in the study. This study adds more knowledge on the likely drivers of UHI for southern African cities. By identifying SUHI drivers in urban cities, it is plausible to formulate policies or initiatives that regulate extreme summer night SUHI.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2212-0955 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2497  
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Author Kim, H.-S.; Lee, Y.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Correlation Analysis of Image Reproduction and Display Color Temperature Change to Prevent Sleep Disorder Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication IEEE Access Abbreviated Journal IEEE Access  
  Volume 7 Issue (up) Pages 59091-59099  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract This paper aims to determine the effect of the smartphone warm color temperature functionthat relieves display’s HEVL (high-energy visible light and short wavelength series blue light), which isknown to cause suppression of melatonin secretion on actual image reproduction quality. For this study,the author of this paper measured the display based on the color difference in 26 sampling colors. It was foundthat for correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4000 K or less, the color difference rose sharply, centeringaround red and green. In hardware or software, a low CCT was realized by reducing the output centered onblue and green, but in actual color quality, a problem arose in the red and green channels. As far as tonegradation is concerned,1E increased for CCT of 4500 K or less while the accuracy of the shadow detail wasreduced. With regard to color gamut reproduction, for the coverage of sRGB color space, the color gamutbecame narrow for CCT of 5500 K or less, and for volume, the color gamut became narrow sharply for CCTof 4000 K. It was found that the maximum CCT changes to prevent a decline in melatonin secretion at alevel of minimizing the degradation of image quality is 4000–4500 K.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2169-3536 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2500  
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