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Author Lyytimäki, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Avoiding overly bright future: The systems intelligence perspective on the management of light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Environmental Development Abbreviated Journal Environmental Development  
  Volume 16 Issue (up) Pages 4-14  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2211-4645 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1200  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S.; Ribas, S.; Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modal evaluation of the anthropogenic night sky brightness at arbitrary distances from a light source Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Optics Abbreviated Journal J. of Optics  
  Volume 17 Issue (up) Pages 105607  
  Keywords Skyglow; light propagation, atmospheric optics, light pollution  
  Abstract The artificial emissions of light contribute to a high extent to the observed brightness of the night sky in many places of the world. Determining the all-sky radiance of anthropogenic origin requires solving the radiative transfer equation for ground-level light sources, generally resorting to a double-scattering approximation in order to account for the observed radiance patterns with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Since the all-sky radiance distribution produced by an elementary light source depends on the distance to the observer in a way that is not immediately obvious, the contributions of sources located at different distances have to be computed on an individual basis, solving for each one the corresponding scattering integrals. In this paper we show that these calculations may be significantly alleviated by using a modal approach, whereby the hemispheric night-sky radiance is expanded in terms of a convenient basis of two-dimensional (2D) orthogonal functions. Since the modal coefficients of this expansion do vary smoothly with the distance to the observer, the all-sky brightness distributions produced by light sources located at arbitrary intermediate distances can be efficiently estimated by interpolation, provided that the coefficients at a discrete set of distances are accurately determined beforehand.  
  Address Area de Optica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela Campus Sur, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2040-8986 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1235  
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Author Brüning A., Hölker, F., Franke, S., Preuer, T., Kloas, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 543 Issue (up) Pages 214-222  
  Keywords Animals  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1294  
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Author Mège, P.; Ödeen, A.; Théry, M.; Picard, D.; Secondi, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Partial Opsin Sequences Suggest UV-Sensitive Vision is Widespread in Caudata Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evolutionary Biology Abbreviated Journal Evol. Biol.  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages 1-10  
  Keywords Animals; Caudata; amphibians; ultraviolet; ultraviolet vision; opsin; photobiology; SWS1; Paralog gene; Tuning site; Nocturnal species; Sliding window; Ka/Ks  
  Abstract Ultraviolet (UV) vision exists in several animal groups. Intuitively, one would expect this trait to be favoured in species living in bright environments, where UV light is the most present. However, UV sensitivity, as deduced from sequences of UV photoreceptors and/or ocular media transmittance, is also present in nocturnal species, raising questions about the selective pressure maintaining this perceptual ability. Amphibians are among the most nocturnal vertebrates but their visual ecology remains poorly understood relative to other groups. Perhaps because many of these species breed in environments that filter out a large part of UV radiation, physiological and behavioural studies of UV sensitivity in this group are scarce. We investigated the extent of UV vision in Caudata, the order of amphibians with the most nocturnal habits. We could recover sequences of the UV sensitive SWS1 opsin in 40 out of 58 species, belonging to 6 families. In all of these species, the evidence suggests the presence of functional SWS1 opsins under purifying selection, potentially allowing UV vision. Interestingly, most species whose opsin genes failed to amplify exhibited particular ecological features that could drive the loss of UV vision. This likely wide distribution of functional UV photoreceptors in Caudata sheds a new light on the visual ecology of amphibians and questions the function of UV vision in nocturnal animal species.  
  Address GECCO, Université d’Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045, Angers, France; pascal.mege(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0071-3260 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1299  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Silva, A.D.; Diez‐Méndez, D.; Kempenaers, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of experimental night lighting on the daily timing of winter foraging in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol  
  Volume 48 Issue (up) Pages 862-871  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The ecological effects of light pollution are becoming better understood, especially in birds. Recent studies have shown that several bird species can use street lighting to extend activity into the night during the breeding season. However, most of these studies are correlational and little is known about the effects of artificial night lighting on the timing of activities outside the breeding season. During winter, low temperatures and short days may limit foraging opportunities and can negatively affect survival of resident birds. However, night lighting may allow them to expand the time niche available for foraging. Here, we report on a study where we repeatedly manipulated the amount of night lighting during early winter at automated feeding stations in a natural forest. We used video-recordings at the feeders to determine the time of the first (at dawn) and last (at dusk) foraging visits for six songbird species. We predicted that all species, and in particular the naturally early-foraging species, would advance their daily onset of foraging during the mornings with night lighting, but would show minimal or no delays in their daily cessation of foraging during the lighted evenings. We found that two early-foraging species, the blue tit and the great tit, started foraging earlier during the experimentally lighted mornings. However, in great tits, this effect was weak and restricted to nights with inclement weather. The light treatment did not have any effect on the start of foraging in the willow/marsh tit, the nuthatch, the European jay, and the blackbird. Artificial night lighting did not cause later foraging at dusk in any of the six species. Overall, our results suggest that artificial light during winter has only small effects on timing of foraging. We discuss these findings and the importance of temperature and winter weather in shaping the observed foraging patterns.  
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  ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1627  
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