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Author Sharpe, C.M. openurl 
  Title Brief Outline of the History of Electric Illumination in the District of Columbia Type Journal Article
  Year 1946 Publication Records of the Columbia Historical Society, Washington, DC Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 48 Issue (up) Pages 191-207  
  Keywords History  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2430  
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Author Ou, J.; Liu, X.; Liu, P.; Liu, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evaluation of Luojia 1-01 nighttime light imagery for impervious surface detection: A comparison with NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation  
  Volume 81 Issue (up) Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Impervious surface detection is significant to urban dynamic monitoring and environment management. One of the most effective approaches to evaluating the impervious surface is the use of nighttime light imagery. However, little work on this subject was carried out with the new generation nighttime light data from Luojia 1-01 satellite, which has a finer spatial resolution than the predecessors such as the nightlight data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Satellite. Therefore, this study conducted the first investigation of the capacity of Luojia 1-01 nighttime light data in detecting the extent and degree of impervious surfaces. Focusing on three cities of Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou, several maps of the spatial extent of impervious surface areas were first extracted from two types of nighttime lights data (Luojia 1-01 and NPP-VIIRS data) by applying a dynamic threshold segmentation method. Meanwhile, a series of polynomial regression models were adopted to estimate the relation between imperiousness degree and light intensity. The results compared with the reference data derived from Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) show that Luojia 1-01 data can produce a more precise map of the spatial extent of impervious surfaces than NPP-VIIRS data owing to the finer spatial resolution and the wider measurement range. Nevertheless, Luojia 1-01 data failed to provide reliable estimates of the imperviousness degree in comparison with NPP-VIIRS data as this nighttime light imagery with finer spatial resolution can better discriminate the surfaces that have the same imperviousness degree but are illuminated with different light intensities, consequently resulting in a weak correlation between imperviousness degree and light intensity. The over- and under-estimates of imperviousness degree suggested an increase in spatial resolution of nightlight imagery does not always improve the accuracy and reliability of nighttime light-based estimations. These study results confirmed that Luojia 1-01 nightlight imagery is a potential and promising data source for mapping the spatial extent of impervious surface areas, but difficult to accurately estimate the imperviousness degree. Future research may improve the accuracy of imperviousness degree estimation by integrating the Luojia 1-01 nightlight imagery with other useful data sources.  
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  ISSN 0303-2434 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2436  
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Author Casasole, G.; Raap, T.; Costantini, D.; AbdElgawad, H.; Asard, H.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Neither artificial light at night, anthropogenic noise nor distance from roads are associated with oxidative status of nestlings in an urban population of songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 210 Issue (up) Pages 14-21  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Increasing urbanization is responsible for road-related pollutants and causes an unprecedented increase in light and noise pollution, with potential detrimental effects for individual animals, communities and ecosystems. These stressors rarely act in isolation but studies dissecting the effects of these multiple stressors are lacking. Moreover, studies on urban stressors have mainly focused on adults, while exposure in early-life may be detrimental but is largely ignored. To fill this important knowledge gap, we studied if artificial light at night, anthropogenic noise and road-related pollution (using distance from roads as a proxy) explain variation in oxidative status in great tit nestlings (Parus major) in an urban population. Artificial light at night, anthropogenic noise and distance from roads were not associated with variation of the nine studied metrics of oxidative status (superoxide dismutase-SOD-, glutathione peroxidase-GPX, catalase-CAT-, non-enzymatic total antioxidant capacity-TAC-, reduced glutathione-GSH-, oxidized glutathione-GSSG-, ratio GSH/GSSG, protein carbonyls and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances-TBARS). Interestingly, for all oxidative status metrics, we found that there was more variation in oxidative status among individuals of the same nest compared to between different nests. We also showed an increase in protein carbonyls and a decrease of the ratio GSH/GSSG as the day advanced, and an increase of GPX when weather conditions deteriorated. Our study suggests that anthropogenic noise, artificial light at night and road-related pollution are not the most important sources of variation in oxidative status in great tit nestlings. It also highlights the importance of considering bleeding time and weather conditions in studies with free-living animals.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology & Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28499963 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2457  
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Author Welbers, A.A.M.H.; van Dis, N.E.; Kolvoort, A.M.; Ouyang, J.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.; Dominoni, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night Reduces Daily Energy Expenditure in Breeding Great Tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Front. Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume 5 Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The ecological impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly recognized process that accompanies expanding urbanization. Yet, we have limited knowledge on the impact of ALAN on wild species, and on the potential to mitigate any negative effects by using different light sources and colors. In birds, effects of ALAN on activity levels are reported for several species and, hence, their daily energy expenditure (DEE) may be affected. DEE is a potent mediator of life-history trade-offs and fitness and thus an important aspect to consider when examining the potential long-term ecological effects of ALAN. Previous work has suggested that birds exposed to ALAN show higher levels of provisioning and nocturnal activity, suggesting that white ALAN increases DEE. Other factors regulating DEE, such as provisioning behavior and food availability, might also respond to ALAN and thus indirectly affect DEE. We tested the hypothesis that ALAN increases DEE using an experimental setup where four previously unlit transects were illuminated with either white, green, or red LED light, or left dark as a control treatment. This setup was replicated in eight locations across the Netherlands. We measured DEE of our focal species, the great tit (Parus major), using a novel doubly labeled water technique that uses breath rather than blood samples. Contrary to our expectations, birds feeding their offspring under white and green ALAN showed lower DEE compared to birds in the control dark treatment. Differences in chick provisioning activity did not explain this result, as neither visit rates nor daily activity timing was affected by light treatment. However, food availability under white and green light was much higher compared to red light and the dark control. This difference strongly suggests that the lower DEE under white and green ALAN sites is a consequence of higher food availability in these treatments. This result shows that there can be positive, indirect effects of ALAN for breeding song birds which may balance against the negative direct effects shown in previous studies.  
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  ISSN 2296-701X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2460  
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Author Hatori, M.; Gronfier, C.; Van Gelder, R.N.; Bernstein, P.S.; Carreras, J.; Panda, S.; Marks, F.; Sliney, D.; Hunt, C.E.; Hirota, T.; Furukawa, T.; Tsubota, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Global rise of potential health hazards caused by blue light-induced circadian disruption in modern aging societies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication NPJ Aging and Mechanisms of Disease Abbreviated Journal NPJ Aging Mech Dis  
  Volume 3 Issue (up) Pages 9  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract Mammals receive light information through the eyes, which perform two major functions: image forming vision to see objects and non-image forming adaptation of physiology and behavior to light. Cone and rod photoreceptors form images and send the information via retinal ganglion cells to the brain for image reconstruction. In contrast, nonimage-forming photoresponses vary widely from adjustment of pupil diameter to adaptation of the circadian clock. nonimage-forming responses are mediated by retinal ganglion cells expressing the photopigment melanopsin. Melanopsin-expressing cells constitute 1-2% of retinal ganglion cells in the adult mammalian retina, are intrinsically photosensitive, and integrate photic information from rods and cones to control nonimage-forming adaptation. Action spectra of ipRGCs and of melanopsin photopigment peak around 480 nm blue light. Understanding melanopsin function lets us recognize considerable physiological effects of blue light, which is increasingly important in our modern society that uses light-emitting diode. Misalignment of circadian rhythmicity is observed in numerous conditions, including aging, and is thought to be involved in the development of age-related disorders, such as depression, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and cancer. The appropriate regulation of circadian rhythmicity by proper lighting is therefore essential. This perspective introduces the potential risks of excessive blue light for human health through circadian rhythm disruption and sleep deprivation. Knowing the positive and negative aspects, this study claims the importance of being exposed to light at optimal times and intensities during the day, based on the concept of the circadian clock, ultimately to improve quality of life to have a healthy and longer life.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Japan.0000 0004 1936 9959grid.26091.3c  
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  ISSN 2056-3973 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28649427; PMCID:PMC5473809 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2462  
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