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Author Zahra, H. S., Iqbal, A., Hassan, S. H., Shakir, H. A., Khan, M., Irfan, M., ... & Ali, S.
Title Epigenetics: A Bridge between Artificial Light at Night and Breast Cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Punjab University Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 34 Issue 2 Pages 231-238
Keywords (down) Review; Human Health
Abstract The second most frequent cancer all over the world is breast cancer (BC). It is

reported that only about 10% BC cases are attributed due to inherited genetic mutations while remaining 90% cancer cases are associated with environmental factors. Artificial light at night (ALAN) is considered one of the major environmental risk factors for breast cancer. It inhibits production of melatonin (MLT) from pineal gland which results in abnormal epigenetic changes that relates with an increased risk of BC. The most important ALAN-mediated epigenetic changes include methylation of DNA and acetylation of histone, which are significant for growth, development and progression of BC. DNA hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands inhibits transcriptional activity by methyltransferase enzyme which results in inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG), while in hypomethylation, demethyltransferase enzyme causes the activation of oncogenes by promoting transcriptional activity. Contrary to DNA methylation, histone acetylation and deacetylation results in chromatin opening and closing, respectively; leading to transcriptional activation and inactivation of genes. Histone acetylation has been frequently detected in oncogenes while histone deacetylation in TSG. Collective data from various studies demonstrate that DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation of TSG lead to inactivation of TSG and activation of oncogenes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence based relationship between ALAN and oncogenes expression through epigenetic remodeling by DNA methylation and histone acetylation.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2973
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Author Torriglia, A.; Mascarelli, F.; Behar-Cohen, F.
Title [New lighting technology and our eyes] Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Medecine Sciences : M/S Abbreviated Journal Med Sci (Paris)
Volume 36 Issue 8-9 Pages 769-773
Keywords (down) Review; Human Health
Abstract The retina is the neurosensitive layer of the eye. In this tissue, photoreceptors convert light into nerve signals to be relayed to the brain. Despite retinal specialization in the treatment of light, excessive exposure can cause retinal damage, called retinal phototoxicity. In recent years, lighting devices rich in wavelengths of high energy (blue light) appeared, raising new concerns about retinal protection against light damage. We focus here on light-induced ocular diseases and the possible influence on visual health of new lighting technologies.

Dans la rétine, couche neurosensorielle de l’œil, les photorécepteurs transforment le signal lumineux en influx nerveux interprétable par le cerveau. Malgré sa spécialisation dans le traitement des signaux lumineux, la rétine peut subir des dommages, à la suite d’une exposition excessive à la lumière ; on parle alors de phototoxicité rétinienne. Ces dernières années, l’apparition de dispositifs d’éclairage riches en longueurs d’onde de forte énergie (ce que l’on nomme lumière bleue), remet le problème de la phototoxicité rétinienne à l’ordre du jour. Nous discutons des pathologies oculaires induites par la lumière et de la possible influence des nouvelles technologies d’éclairage sur notre santé visuelle.
Address Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Inserm, Sorbonne Universite, USPC, universite de Paris Descartes, equipe << Physiopathologie des maladies oculaires : innovations therapeutiques >>, 15 rue de l'Ecole de Medecine, F-75006 Paris, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language French Summary Language Original Title Les nouveaux eclairages et nos yeux
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0767-0974 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32821054 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3097
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Author Foster, R.G.; Hughes, S.; Peirson, S.N.
Title Circadian Photoentrainment in Mice and Humans Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Biology Abbreviated Journal Biology (Basel)
Volume 9 Issue 7 Pages
Keywords (down) Review; Animals; Human Health; circadian; entrainment; human; melanopsin (OPN4); mouse; photoreceptor
Abstract Light around twilight provides the primary entrainment signal for circadian rhythms. Here we review the mechanisms and responses of the mouse and human circadian systems to light. Both utilize a network of photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin (OPN4). In both species action spectra and functional expression of OPN4 in vitro show that melanopsin has a lambdamax close to 480 nm. Anatomical findings demonstrate that there are multiple pRGC sub-types, with some evidence in mice, but little in humans, regarding their roles in regulating physiology and behavior. Studies in mice, non-human primates and humans, show that rods and cones project to and can modulate the light responses of pRGCs. Such an integration of signals enables the rods to detect dim light, the cones to detect higher light intensities and the integration of intermittent light exposure, whilst melanopsin measures bright light over extended periods of time. Although photoreceptor mechanisms are similar, sensitivity thresholds differ markedly between mice and humans. Mice can entrain to light at approximately 1 lux for a few minutes, whilst humans require light at high irradiance (>100's lux) and of a long duration (>30 min). The basis for this difference remains unclear. As our retinal light exposure is highly dynamic, and because photoreceptor interactions are complex and difficult to model, attempts to develop evidence-based lighting to enhance human circadian entrainment are very challenging. A way forward will be to define human circadian responses to artificial and natural light in the “real world” where light intensity, duration, spectral quality, time of day, light history and age can each be assessed.
Address Sleep & Circadian Neuroscience Institute (SCNi), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford Molecular Pathology Institute, South Parks Road, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RF, UK
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 2079-7737 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:32708259; PMCID:PMC7408241 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3082
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Author Andreatta, G.; Tessmar-Raible, K.
Title The still dark side of the moon: molecular mechanisms of lunar-controlled rhythms and clocks Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal J Mol Biol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords (down) Review; Animals; Hormones; Lunar rhythms; Physiology; Proteome; Transcriptome
Abstract Starting with the beginning of the last century, a multitude of scientific studies has documented that the lunar cycle times behaviors and physiology in many organisms. It is plausible that even the first life forms adapted to the different rhythms controlled by the moon. Consistently, many marine species exhibit lunar rhythms, and also the number of documented “lunar-rhythmic” terrestrial species is increasing. Organisms follow diverse lunar geophysical/astronomical rhythms, which differ significantly in terms of period length: from hours (circalunidian and circatidal rhythms) to days (circasemilunar and circalunar cycles). Evidence for internal circatital and circalunar oscillators exists for a range of species based on past behavioral studies, but those species with well-documented behaviorally free-running lunar rhythms are not typically used for molecular studies. Thus, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely obscure: the dark side of the moon. Here we review findings which start to connect molecular pathways with moon-controlled physiology and behaviors. The present data indicate connections between metabolic/endocrine pathways and moon-controlled rhythms, as well as interactions between circadian and circatidal/circalunar rhythms. Moreover, recent high-throughput analyses provide useful leads towards pathways, as well as molecular markers. However, for each interpretation it is important to carefully consider the – partly substantially differing – conditions used in each experimental paradigm. In the future, it will be important to use lab experiments to delineate the specific mechanisms of the different solar- and lunar-controlled rhythms, but to also start integrating them together, as life has evolved equally long under rhythms of both sun and moon.
Address Max Perutz Labs, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna; Research Platform “Rhythms of Life”, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna. Electronic address: kristin.tessmar@mfpl.ac.at
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ISSN 0022-2836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32198116 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2865
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Author Rumanova, V.S.; Okuliarova, M.; Zeman, M.
Title Differential Effects of Constant Light and Dim Light at Night on the Circadian Control of Metabolism and Behavior Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci
Volume 21 Issue 15 Pages
Keywords (down) Review; Animals; behavior; chronodisruption; circadian; corticosterone; dim light at night; hormones; locomotor activity; melatonin; metabolism; rhythms
Abstract The disruption of circadian rhythms by environmental conditions can induce alterations in body homeostasis, from behavior to metabolism. The light:dark cycle is the most reliable environmental agent, which entrains circadian rhythms, although its credibility has decreased because of the extensive use of artificial light at night. Light pollution can compromise performance and health, but underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The present review assesses the consequences induced by constant light (LL) in comparison with dim light at night (dLAN) on the circadian control of metabolism and behavior in rodents, since such an approach can identify the key mechanisms of chronodisruption. Data suggest that the effects of LL are more pronounced compared to dLAN and are directly related to the light level and duration of exposure. Dim LAN reduces nocturnal melatonin levels, similarly to LL, but the consequences on the rhythms of corticosterone and behavioral traits are not uniform and an improved quantification of the disrupted rhythms is needed. Metabolism is under strong circadian control and its disruption can lead to various pathologies. Moreover, metabolism is not only an output, but some metabolites and peripheral signal molecules can feedback on the circadian clockwork and either stabilize or amplify its desynchronization.
Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, Ilkovicova 6, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovakia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32751870 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3062
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