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Author Hsu, C.-N.; Tain, Y.-L.
Title Light and Circadian Signaling Pathway in Pregnancy: Programming of Adult Health and Disease Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci
Volume 21 Issue 6 Pages
Keywords (down) Review; Human Health; circadian rhythm; developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD); developmental programming; glucocorticoid; hypertension; light; melatonin; pregnancy
Abstract Light is a crucial environmental signal that affects elements of human health, including the entrainment of circadian rhythms. A suboptimal environment during pregnancy can increase the risk of offspring developing a wide range of chronic diseases in later life. Circadian rhythm disruption in pregnant women may have deleterious consequences for their progeny. In the modern world, maternal chronodisruption can be caused by shift work, jet travel across time zones, mistimed eating, and excessive artificial light exposure at night. However, the impact of maternal chronodisruption on the developmental programming of various chronic diseases remains largely unknown. In this review, we outline the impact of light, the circadian clock, and circadian signaling pathways in pregnancy and fetal development. Additionally, we show how to induce maternal chronodisruption in animal models, examine emerging research demonstrating long-term negative implications for offspring health following maternal chronodisruption, and summarize current evidence related to light and circadian signaling pathway targeted therapies in pregnancy to prevent the development of chronic diseases in offspring.
Address Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32210175 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2874
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Author Touitou, Y.; Point, S.
Title Effects and mechanisms of action of light-emitting diodes on the human retina and internal clock Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res
Volume 190 Issue Pages in press
Keywords (down) Review; Human Health; Biological clock; Blue light; Electronic media; Endocrine disruptor; Environmental synchronizers; Light at night; Melatonin; Night work; Retinal phototoxicity; Shift work; Sleep disorder
Abstract White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) will likely become the most used lighting devices worldwide in the future because of their very low prices over the course of their long lifespans which can be up to several tens of thousands of hours. The expansion of LED use in both urban and domestic lighting has prompted questions regarding their possible health effects, because the light that they provide is potentially high in the harmful blue band (400-500nm) of the visible light spectrum. Research on the potential effects of LEDs and their blue band on human health has followed three main directions: 1) examining their retinal phototoxicity; 2) examining disruption of the internal clock, i.e., an out-of-sync clock, in shift workers and night workers, including the accompanying health issues, most concerningly an increased relative risk of cancer; and 3) examining risky, inappropriate late-night use of smartphones and consoles among children and adolescents. Here, we document the recognized or potential health issues associated with LED lighting together with their underlying mechanisms of action. There is so far no evidence that LED lighting is deleterious to human retina under normal use. However, exposure to artificial light at night is a new source of pollution because it affects the circadian clock. Blue-rich light, including cold white LEDs, should be considered a new endocrine disruptor, because it affects estrogen secretion and has unhealthful consequences in women, as demonstrated to occur via a complex mechanism.
Address Cooper Securite SAS, 63200, Riom, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32758719 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3091
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Author Leung, J.M.; Martinez, M.E.
Title Circadian Rhythms in Environmental Health Sciences Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Current Environmental Health Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Environ Health Rep
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords (down) Review; Human Health; Asthma; Biomarkers; Breast cancer; Circadian rhythms; DNA methylation; Environmental health
Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review aims to explore how circadian rhythms influence disease susceptibility and potentially modify the effect of environmental exposures. We aimed to identify biomarkers commonly used in environmental health research that have also been the subject of chronobiology studies, in order to review circadian rhythms of relevance to environmental health and determine if time-of-day is an important factor to consider in environmental health studies. Moreover, we discuss opportunities for studying how environmental exposures may interact with circadian rhythms to structure disease pathology and etiology. RECENT FINDINGS: In recent years, the study of circadian rhythms in mammals has flourished. Animal models revealed that all body tissues have circadian rhythms. In humans, circadian rhythms were also shown to exist at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, and physiological processes, including responding to oxidative stress, cell trafficking, and sex hormone production, respectively. Together, these rhythms are an essential component of human physiology and can shape an individual's susceptibility and response to disease. Circadian rhythms are relatively unexplored in environmental health research. However, circadian clocks control many physiological and behavioral processes that impact exposure pathways and disease systems. We believe this review will motivate new studies of (i) the impact of exposures on circadian rhythms, (ii) how circadian rhythms modify the effect of environmental exposures, and (iii) how time-of-day impacts our ability to observe the body's response to exposure.
Address Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, Room 16-421C, New York, NY, USA. mem2352@cumc.columbia.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2196-5412 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32662059 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3055
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Author Fleury, G.; Masis-Vargas, A.; Kalsbeek, A.
Title Metabolic Implications of Exposure to Light at Night: Lessons from Animal and Human Studies Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) Abbreviated Journal Obesity (Silver Spring)
Volume 28 Suppl 1 Issue Pages S18-S28
Keywords (down) Review; Human Health; Animals; Obesity
Abstract Lately, the incidence of overweight, obesity, and type 2 diabetes has shown a staggering increase. To prevent and treat these conditions, one must look at their etiology. As life on earth has evolved under the conditions of nature's 24-hour light/dark cycle, it seems likely that exposure to artificial light at night (LAN) would affect physiology. Indeed, ample evidence has shown that LAN impacts many metabolic parameters, at least partly via the biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. This review focuses on the impact of chronic and acute effects of LAN of different wavelengths on locomotor activity, food intake, the sleep/wake cycle, body temperature, melatonin, glucocorticoids, and glucose and lipid metabolism. While chronic LAN disturbs daily rhythms in these parameters, experiments using short-term LAN exposure also have shown acute negative effects in metabolically active peripheral tissues. Experiments using LAN of different wavelengths not only have indicated an important role for melanopsin, the photopigment found in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, but also provided evidence that each wavelength may have a specific impact on energy metabolism. Importantly, exposure to LAN has been shown to impact glucose homeostasis also in humans and to be associated with an increased incidence of overweight, obesity, and atherosclerosis.
Address Hypothalamic Integration Mechanisms, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN), Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1930-7381 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32700826 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3079
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Author Lee, E.; Kim, M.
Title Light and Life at Night as Circadian Rhythm Disruptors Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Chronobiology in Medicine Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 95-102
Keywords (down) Review; Human Health
Abstract Light is an important entraining agent for endogenous circadian rhythms. Artificial light at night (ALAN) negatively influences the circadian system, inducing acute effects on sleep and cognition, as well as chronic endocrine-disrupting effects resulting in obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Although shift workers may be exposed to extreme ALAN, its impact on their health is obscured by factors such as daylight exposure, meal and sleep scheduling, and physical and social behavior. Studies have revealed a significant increase in breast cancer in high ALAN-polluted areas, although the correlation with outdoor or indoor lighting conditions is controversial. Increasing use of electronic devices makes it difficult to assess ALAN exposure in the general population. The development of surrogate markers and critical parameters is crucial for health study by ALAN exposure, and such markers should include risk factors related to ALAN exposure. The present review considers articles investigating the risk of ALAN for shift workers, the general population, and users of electronic devices, and addresses susceptibility factors, including age, sex, and chronotype. Shift workers may be regarded as an extreme ALAN-exposure group, but the growing use of electronic devices and lifestyle changes in the general population make difficult to differentiate ALAN risks to health.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2903
Permanent link to this record