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Author Linares, H.; Masana, E.; Ribas, S.J.; Aubé, M.; Simoneau, A.; Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night sky brightness simulation over Montsec protected area Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 249 Issue Pages 106990  
  Keywords (down) Skyglow  
  Abstract Night sky brightness over Montsec Observatory (north-east of Spain) has been computed and checked against measurements using Illumina numerical model [2]. In a previous publication [20] the methodology was validated and light pollution received in the observatory coming from a unique city was computed. Here we present a simulation that includes all the sources that has a significant impact over the quality of the night sky in this area. The decision of which sources should be included in the simulations was taken following the methodology explained by [6]: using a point spread function (PSF) as a simple approach to estimate which sources are brightening the sky dome over the observer. An ad hoc PSF derived with Illumina was used with the purpose of avoiding to have to rely on already existing empirical PSF. The resulting PSF can be used in any location with similar atmospheric conditions. Differences in the spectrum of the lamps can be accounted easily by adjusting a spectrum scale factor. Illumina simulates the artificial sky brightness received (W/sr/m2) by an observer from any direction. Adding the natural sky brightness allows to compare the simulations to measurements taken with different instrumentation. In our case simulations were checked against ASTMON, SQC and SQM measurements. They show a good agreement both in absolute values and in geographical patterns for the three filters studied, B, V and R. The methodology presented opens many possibilities, such as increasing the reliability of the maps that point out the light pollution main contributors for any location, and reducing the amount of time needed to perform an accurate simulation of the night sky brightness.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2923  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Toward an atlas of the number of visible stars Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 107059  
  Keywords (down) Skyglow  
  Abstract Modelling techniques for the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere allow the computation of maps of artificial night sky brightness in any direction of the sky, involving a large number of details from satellite data. Cinzano et al. (2001a) introduced a method of mapping naked eye star visibility at the zenith from large areas based on satellite radiance measurements and Garstang models of the propagation of light pollution. It takes into account the altitude of each land area from digital elevation data, natural sky brightness in the chosen sky direction based on the Garstang approach, eye capability after Garstang and Schaefer, and atmospheric extinction in the visual photometric band. Here we discuss how to use these methods to obtain maps of the average number of visible stars when looking at the night sky hemisphere, finally answering, site by site, the question of how many stars are visible in the sky. This is not trivial, as the number of stars visible depends on the limiting magnitude in each direction in the sky, and this depends on sky brightness in that direction, atmospheric extinction at that zenith distance and the observer's visual acuity and experience. We present, as an example, a map of the number of visible stars in Italy to an average observer on clear nights with a resolution of approximately 1 km.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2928  
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Author Tahar, M., Ahmad, N., & Ismail, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Identifying Light Pollution Sources at Two Major Observatories in Malaysia Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Sains Malaysiana Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 49 Issue 2 Pages 439-445  
  Keywords (down) Skyglow  
  Abstract A spectral observation and analysis were conducted in order to identify the main contributor of sky brightness at two of Malaysia’s most active observatories. The light pollution observations were carried out under moonless clear night sky

with a 90 mm refractor telescope and SBIG’s Self Guiding Spectrograph. We found that the main contributor to Balai Cerap Teluk Kemang (BCTK) sky brightness is High Pressure Sodium (HPS) street lighting due to its number and density

used within 5 km radius of the observatory. HPS spectral lines dominate the spectrum between 556 – 640 nm, agrees with the orange hue visible to the naked eye. The intensity due to HPS lighting is so high that there was no trace of the

concerned white LED spotlight less than 1 km away. However, some traces of elements from Mercury Vapor (MV) lamps at 3.6 km distance managed to reach the observatory in the green spectrum. The finding concludes that the nearby LED

spotlight does not affect the night sky brightness over BCTK. Meanwhile, Langkawi National Observatory (LNO) sky profile was also observed during heavy fishing season as comparison. The sky spectra for LNO was similar to BCTK in

the reds except for a very distinct peak in green region corresponding highly with green MV (532 – 547 nm) with peaks at 536 nm and 546 nm, matches the lamps used for squid fishing around the island. The intensity of the green MV light matches the intensity of HPS light sources, during the observation period of peak squid season in January. This made LNO a far less favorable condition for astronomical observing site compared to BCTK. We also found that LNO sky has brightened 3.767 times compared to finding of 2013.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2951  
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Author Herdiwijaya, D.; Satyaningsih, R.; Luthfiandari,; Prastyo, H.A.; Arumaningtyas, E.P.; Sulaeman, M.; Setiawan, A.; Yulianti, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measurements of sky brightness at Bosscha Observatory, Indonesia Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Heliyon Abbreviated Journal Heliyon  
  Volume 6 Issue 8 Pages e04635  
  Keywords (down) Skyglow  
  Abstract To determine the level of light pollution due to human activities, we performed sky-brightness measurements at Bosscha Observatory, Indonesia (107°36′E; 6°49′S, 1300 m above sea level) for seven years from 2011 to 2018, using a portable photometer pointed at the zenith. From 1692 nightly records, we found that the average brightness on moonless nights reached the 19.70 ± 0.84 and 19.01 ± 0.88 astronomical magnitudes per square arcsecond (mpass), with median values of 19.73 mpass and 19.03 mpass for the AM and PM periods, respectively. The darkest skies occurred in the peak of the summer season during the month of July, which corresponds to the lowest annual temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. The internal temperature of our Sky Quality Meter is adequately stable, and our results correlate well with other measurements. The sky brightness depends on the age of the Moon (days past new Moon) and on seasonal monthly variations, but it is not related to the lunar distance. The night-SB quality can be modified by the coupled climate system as a diurnal cycle to an 11-year solar cycle. The cities around the Observatory, Bandung and Lembang, clearly make strong contributions to light pollution in the area due to unshielded light sources.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2405-8440 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3093  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cui, H.; Shen, J.; Huang, Y.; Shen, X.; So, C.W.; Pun, C.S.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night Sky Brightness Monitoring Network in Wuxi, China Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 107219  
  Keywords (down) skyglow  
  Abstract The rapid development of cities has brought tremendous pressure to astronomical observation, energy security, and the ecosystem. Automatic monitoring of night sky brightness (NSB) can help us to understand its regional differences and time variations of NSB effectively and to investigate the human and natural factors which lead to these changes. In this paper, the construction of Wuxi City night sky brightness monitoring network (WBMN) in China is presented. In addition to introducing the equipment and the installation of the network, a brief analysis of the data obtained from the stations will also be presented. The impact of human activities on the NSB is illustrated through its changes during the Spring Festival (lunar new year) and non-festival nights, and through a comparison study between NSB data taken from locations of different land usages. It is concluded that, while the reduction in human activities after non-festival midnights or the reduction in moon illumination near the new moon epoch led to darker night skies, brightening of the night skies may be attributed to firework displays during the nights of Spring Festival in 2019. On the other hand, the absence of firework during the Spring Festival in 2020 may explain the darker night skies. Finally, there is an evidence that the urban developments in Wuxi are degrading night sky quality.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3054  
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