|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Wanjiru Mbugua, S.; Hay Wong, C.; Ratnayeke, S.
Title Effects of artificial light on the larvae of the firefly Lamprigera sp. in an urban city park, Peninsular Malaysia Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology
Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 82-85
Keywords (up) Animals; Fireflies; Lamprigera
Abstract Firefly populations are threatened globally by habitat alteration, pesticide use, and anthropogenic sources of light. Lamprigera fireflies were recently reported at an urban city park in Kuala Lumpur, Peninsular Malaysia. Here we report on the responses of Lamprigera larvae to artificial light from street lamps on paved park trails. Larvae were located farther from artificial light sources when street lamps were illuminated than when they were not, and mostly where light intensities were lowest, off park trails. Larvae that were located within the direct field of illumination tended to be immobile, whereas, when street lamps were turned off, they actively travelled paved trails. Larvae positioned directly in the path of downwelling light from street lamps at dusk may therefore experience an effectively longer diurnal period, limited time for active foraging, and greater exposure to pedestrian traffic.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Sunway University, Bandar Sunway DE 47500, Selangor, Malaysia; samanth.m(at)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1226-8615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2753
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Villamizar, N.; García-Alcazar, A.; Sánchez-Vázquez, F. J.
Title Effect of light spectrum and photoperiod on the growth, development and survival of European sea bass (Dicentrarchuslabrax) larvae Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume 292 Issue 1-2 Pages 80-86
Keywords (up) animals; fish; light spectrum; photoperiod
Abstract This study investigates how the characteristics (spectrum and photoperiod) of artificial light affect European sea bass eggs and larvae from &#8722; 1 to 40 days post-hatching. Fertilised eggs and larvae were reared under five different light treatments: 12L:12D red light (LDR; half-peak bandwidth = 641–718 nm), 12L:12D blue light (LDB; half-peak bandwidth = 435–500 nm), 12L:12D broad-spectrum white light (LDW; 367 < &#955; < 1057 nm), 24L:0D broad-spectrum white light (LL) and 0L:24D (DD). The results showed that total length at day post-hatching 40 was significantly larger in larvae reared under LDB (15.4 ± 0.6 mm) and LL (15.2 ± 0.6 mm) than in larvae reared under LDR (11.7 ± 0.7 mm). Overall wet weight was highest under LDB (21.6 ± 2.02 mgr) and lowest in LDR larvae (13.6 ± 1.48 mgr). Yolk sac and oil globule absorption occurred more slowly in LDR and DD larvae, while LDB larvae developed their fin, teeth and swim bladder significantly earlier than the rest of the groups. DD larvae were unable to capture food and mortality was 100% by day post-hatching 18, while LDR larvae did not feed on rotifers, but fed on Artemia from day post-hatching 16 onwards. The best survival was obtained with the LL treatment, although significantly more problems with swim bladder development and lower jaw malformations were also identified in this group. In summary, these results highlight the key role of the light spectrum and photoperiod for European sea bass larvae, the best performance being achieved under the light conditions that best approached those of their natural aquatic environment (LDB). These findings should be considered when designing rearing protocols for larvae in aquaculture.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1606
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hou, Z.-S.; Wen, H.-S.; Li, J.-F.; He, F.; Li, Y.; Qi, X.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, K.-Q.; Tao, Y.-X.
Title Effects of photoperiod and light Spectrum on growth performance, digestive enzymes, hepatic biochemistry and peripheral hormones in spotted sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume 507 Issue Pages 419-427
Keywords (up) Animals; fishes; spotted sea bass; Lateolabrax maculatus; Photoperiod
Abstract Growth performance, digestive and metabolic activities, and contents of peripheral hormones of spotted sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus) juveniles were evaluated under natural light and three different light spectrums (white, blue and red) in combination with three photoperiods (light: dark cycle, 12: 12-h, 18: 6-h and 24: 0-h). Bass in 18-h blue light environment displayed the best growth performance and digestive enzyme activities, while red light environment significantly impeded growth and digestive enzyme activities. Altered contents of melatonin, cortisol, thyroid hormones (T3 and T4), and testosterone (T) were observed in bass reared in red light, suggesting that red light could disturb endocrine homeostasis associated with biological rhythm (melatonin), stress coping (melatonin and cortisol), growth and development (T3 and T4), and aggressive behavior or hyperactivity (T3, T4 and T). Impaired growth performance might be due to energy used to cope with stress. We concluded that the red spectrum environment was stressful to spotted bass and the selection of appropriate light conditions (such as 18-h blue light) might lead to a beneficial outcome for spotted sea bass culture.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2329
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author May, D.; Shidemantle, G.; Melnick-Kelley, Q.; Crane, K.; Hua, J.
Title The effect of intensified illuminance and artificial light at night on fitness and susceptibility to abiotic and biotic stressors Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 251 Issue Pages 600-608
Keywords (up) Animals; frogs; amphibians; Lithobates sylvaticus
Abstract Changing light conditions due to human activities represents an important emerging environmental concern. Although changes to natural light conditions can be independently detrimental, in nature, organisms commonly face multiple stressors. To understand the consequences of altered light conditions, we exposed a model amphibian (wood frog; Lithobates sylvaticus) to a control and two anthropogenic light conditions: intensified daytime illuminance and artificial light at night – ALAN (intensified daytime illuminance + extended photoperiod). We measured (1) metrics of fitness (hatching success as well as survival to, size at, and time to metamorphosis) (2) susceptibility (time to death) to a commonly co-occurring anthropogenic stressor, road salt (NaCl) and (3) susceptibility (infection load) to a common parasite (trematode). We also explored behavioral (swimming activity) and physiological (baseline corticosterone (CORT) release rates) changes induced by these light conditions, which may mediate changes in the other measured parameters. We found that both intensified daytime illuminance and ALAN reduced hatching success. In contrast, for amphibians that successfully hatched, neither treatment affected amphibian survival or time to metamorphosis but individuals exposed to ALAN were larger at metamorphosis. The light treatments also had marginal effects; individuals in ALAN treatments were more susceptible to NaCl and trematodes. Finally, tadpoles exposed to ALAN moved significantly less than tadpoles in the control and intensified daytime illuminance treatments, while light had no effect on CORT release rate. Overall, changes in light conditions, in particular ALAN, significantly impacted an amphibian model in laboratory conditions. This work underscores the importance of considering not only the direct effects of light on fitness metrics but also the indirect effects of light with other abiotic and biotic stressors. Anthropogenic-induced changes to light conditions are expected to continue increasing over time so understanding the diverse consequences of shifting light conditions will be paramount to protecting wildlife populations.
Address Biological Sciences Department, Binghamton University (SUNY), Binghamton, NY 13902, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2381
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Deng, K.; Zhu, B.-C.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, Q.-H.; Wang, T.-L.; Wang, J.-C.; Cui, J.-G.
Title Mate choice decisions of female serrate-legged small treefrogs are affected by ambient light under natural, but not enhanced artificial nocturnal light conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behavioural Processes
Volume in press Issue Pages 103997
Keywords (up) Animals; frogs; amphibians; serrate-legged small treefrogs; Kurixalus odontotarsus
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread anthropogenic stimulus that can significantly alter nocturnal animals’ behavior, from migration to foraging to vocal communication. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the mate choice decisions of female serrate-legged small treefrogs (Kurixalus odontotarsus) were influenced by ambient light intensity. Standard two-speaker phonotaxis tests were conducted in a sound attenuating chamber. We set four light conditions (I-IV, from low to high) based on a range of light intensities from the maximum natural light at night (i.e., full moon) to that of the actual calling sites, which had artificial light. Contrary to our prediction, female frogs showed a preference for calls on the bright side in treatment I when they were exposed to identical stimuli. However, females preferred longer calls on the dim side to shorter calls on the bright side in this treatment. In addition, there were no significant effects of choice side, light treatment or their interaction on leave time or choice time. Our results suggest that females are more attracted to mates in bright light under natural nocturnal light conditions, but the preference for longer calls is not altered in serrate-legged small treefrogs.
Address Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2730
Permanent link to this record