|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Petrželková, K. J.; Downs, N. C.; Zukal, J.; Racey, P. A.
Title A comparison between emergence and return activity in pipistrelle bats Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Acta Chiropterologica Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 381-390
Keywords (up) animals; fying mammals: animal behaviour
Abstract Bats may be vulnerable to predation during evening emergence and morning return to their roosts. Early emergence increases the risk of exposure to raptorial birds, but emerging late confers a risk of missing the dusk peak of aerial insects. Here, both emergence and return activity was studied in detail at the same roosts for the first time. We investigated six maternity colonies of pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus) in NE Scotland and recorded light levels and time of emergence and return of the bats with respect to sunset and sunrise on the same nights. Parameters of return activity generally occurred at lower light intensities than those of emergence. Therefore, the interval between dawn return and sunrise was generally longer than that between sunset and dusk emergence. Emergence and return were equal in duration. Bats clustered more on emergence in comparison with return during pregnancy and lactation, whereas during postlactation this trend was reversed.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher BioOne Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1598
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Olde Engberink, A.H.O.; Huisman, J.; Michel, S.; Meijer, J.H.
Title Brief light exposure at dawn and dusk can encode day-length in the neuronal network of the mammalian circadian pacemaker Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication FASEB Journal : Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Abbreviated Journal Faseb J
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords (up) Animals; Gaba; plasticity; seasonal; suprachiasmatic nucleus
Abstract The central circadian pacemaker in mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is important for daily as well as seasonal rhythms. The SCN encodes seasonal changes in day length by adjusting phase distribution among oscillating neurons thereby shaping the output signal used for adaptation of physiology and behavior. It is well-established that brief light exposure at the beginning and end of the day, also referred to as “skeleton” light pulses, are sufficient to evoke the seasonal behavioral phenotype. However, the effect of skeleton light exposure on SCN network reorganization remains unknown. Therefore, we exposed mice to brief morning and evening light pulses that mark the time of dawn and dusk in a short winter- or a long summer day. Single-cell PER2::LUC recordings, electrophysiological recordings of SCN activity, and measurements of GABA response polarity revealed that skeleton light-regimes affected the SCN network to the same degree as full photoperiod. These results indicate the powerful, yet potentially harmful effects of even relatively short light exposures during the evening or night for nocturnal animals.
Address Department of Cellular and Chemical Biology, Laboratory for Neurophysiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0892-6638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32869393 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3116
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Elgert, C.; Hopkins, J.; Kaitala, A.; Candolin, U.
Title Reproduction under light pollution: maladaptive response to spatial variation in artificial light in a glow-worm Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. B.
Volume 287 Issue 1931 Pages 20200806
Keywords (up) Animals; glow-worms; Lampyris noctiluca; insects; maladaptive response; reproduction
Abstract The amount of artificial light at night is growing worldwide, impacting the behaviour of nocturnal organisms. Yet, we know little about the consequences of these behavioural responses for individual fitness and population viability. We investigated if females of the common glow-worm Lampyris noctiluca—which glow in the night to attract males—mitigate negative effects of artificial light on mate attraction by adjusting the timing and location of glowing to spatial variation in light conditions. We found females do not move away from light when exposed to a gradient of artificial light, but delay or even refrain from glowing. Further, we demonstrate that this response is maladaptive, as our field study showed that staying still when exposed to artificial light from a simulated streetlight decreases mate attraction success, while moving only a short distance from the light source can markedly improve mate attraction. These results indicate that glow-worms are unable to respond to spatial variation in artificial light, which may be a factor in their global decline. Consequently, our results support the hypothesis that animals often lack adaptive behavioural responses to anthropogenic environmental changes and underlines the importance of considering behavioural responses when investigating the effects of human activities on wildlife.
Address Organismal and Evolutionary Biology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, 00014 Helsinki, Finland; christina.elgert(at)helsinki.fi
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3049
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Mulder, R.A.; Lesku, J.A.
Title Impacts of artificial light at night on sleep: A review and prospectus Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 409-418
Keywords (up) Animals; Human Activities; Review
Abstract Natural cycles of light and darkness govern the timing of most aspects of animal behavior and physiology. Artificial light at night (ALAN)-a recent and pervasive form of pollution-can mask natural photoperiodic cues and interfere with biological rhythms. One such rhythm vulnerable to perturbation is the sleep-wake cycle. ALAN may greatly influence sleep in humans and wildlife, particularly in animals that sleep predominantly at night. There has been some recent evidence for impacts of ALAN on sleep, but critical questions remain. Some of these can be addressed by adopting approaches already entrenched in sleep research. In this paper, we review the current evidence for impacts of ALAN on sleep, highlight gaps in our understanding, and suggest opportunities for future research.
Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29869374 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1933
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, H.-B.; Whittaker, D.S.; Truong, D.; Mulji, A.K.; Ghiani, C.A.; Loh, D.H.; Colwell, C.S.
Title Blue light therapy improves circadian dysfunction as well as motor symptoms in two mouse models of Huntington's disease Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms Abbreviated Journal Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms
Volume 2 Issue Pages 39-52
Keywords (up) animals; Human Health
Abstract Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) exhibit movement disorders, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive impairments as the disease progresses. Abnormal sleep/wake cycles are common among HD patients with reports of delayed sleep onset, fatigue during the day, and a delayed pattern of melatonin secretion all of which suggest circadian dysfunction. Mouse models of HD confirm disrupted circadian rhythms with pathophysiology found in the central circadian clock (suprachiasmatic nucleus). Importantly, circadian dysfunction manifests early in disease, even before the classic motor symptoms, in both patients and mouse models. Therefore, we hypothesize that the circadian dysfunction may interact with the disease pathology and exacerbate the HD symptoms. If correct, early intervention may benefit patients and delay disease progression. One test of this hypothesis is to determine whether light therapy designed to strengthen this intrinsic timing system can delay the disease progression in mouse models. Therefore, we determined the impact of blue wavelength-enriched light on two HD models: the BACHD and Q175 mice. Both models received 6 hours of blue-light at the beginning of their daily light cycle for 3 months. After treatment, both genotypes showed improvements in their locomotor activity rhythm without significant change to their sleep behavior. Critically, treated mice of both lines exhibited improved motor performance compared to untreated controls. Focusing on the Q175 genotype, we sought to determine whether the treatment altered signaling pathways in brain regions known to be impacted by HD using NanoString gene expression assays. We found that the expression of several HD relevant markers was altered in the striatum and cortex of the treated mice. Our study demonstrates that strengthening the circadian system can delay the progression of HD in pre-clinical models. This work suggests that lighting conditions should be considered when managing treatment of HD and other neurodegenerative disorders.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2451-9944 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1626
Permanent link to this record