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Author Borck, P.C.; Batista, T.M.; Vettorazzi, J.F.; Soares, G.M.; Lubaczeuski, C.; Guan, D.; Boschero, A.C.; Vieira, E.; Lazar, M.A.; Carneiro, E.M.
Title Nighttime light exposure enhances Rev-erbalpha-targeting microRNAs and contributes to hepatic steatosis Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental Abbreviated Journal Metabolism
Volume 85 Issue Pages 250-258
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) disrupts the biological rhythms and has been associated with the development of metabolic syndrome. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) display a critical role in fine-tuning the circadian system and energy metabolism. In this study, we aimed to assess whether altered miRNAs expression in the liver underlies metabolic disorders caused by disrupted biological rhythms. RESULTS: We found that C3H/HePas mice exposed to ALAN developed obesity, and hepatic steatosis, which was paralleled by decreased expression of Rev-erbalpha and up-regulation of its lipogenic targets ACL and FAS in liver. Furthermore, the expression of Rev-erbalpha-targeting miRNAs, miR-140-5p, 185-5p, 326-5p and 328-5p were increased in this group. Consistently, overexpression of these miRNAs in primary hepatocytes reduced Rev-erbalpha expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Importantly, overexpression of Rev-erbalpha-targeting miRNAs increased mRNA levels of Acly and Fasn. CONCLUSION: Thus, altered miRNA profile is an important mechanism underlying the disruption of the peripheral clock caused by exposure to ALAN, which could lead to hepatic steatosis.
Address Obesity and Comorbidities Research Center, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas/UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil; Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas/UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0026-0495 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29751019 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1891
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Author Jong, M. de; Eertwegh, L. van den; Beskers, R.E.; Vries, P.P. de; Spoelstra, K.; Visser, M.E.
Title Timing of Avian Breeding in an Urbanised World Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ardea Abbreviated Journal Ardea
Volume 106 Issue 1 Pages 31-38
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract A large part of the world is urbanised, and the process of urbanisation is ongoing. This causes dramatic alterations of species' habitat such as increased night light, sound levels and temperature, along with direct disturbance by human activity. We used eight years of citizen science data from ten common bird species breeding in nest boxes throughout The Netherlands to study the relationship between urbanisation and a key life history trait, timing of breeding. We used nightly light levels in the form of sky brightness and light emission as a proxy for urbanisation as the dramatic change of the night-time environment is a prominent effect of urbanisation. We expected birds to lay earlier in areas with more light at night, i.e. in more urbanised areas. We found, however, no relationship between light levels and seasonal timing in the ten species studied. A limitation of our study is that there was only limited data for the areas that were urbanised most (e.g. inside cities). Most nest box study areas are located in areas with a limited level of urbanisation, and hence with relatively low light levels of light at night. The lack of data on breeding birds in more urbanised environments, which is a rapidly expanding habitat for an increasing number of species worldwide, should be the focus of attention and citizen science would be highly suitable to also provide data for such areas.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0373-2266 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1893
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Author Shen, J.; Zhu, X.; Gu, Y.; Zhang, C.; Huang, J.; Qing, X.
Title Toxic effect of visible light on Drosophila lifespan depending upon diet protein content Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences Abbreviated Journal J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci
Volume 74 Issue 2 Pages 163-167
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract We investigated the toxic effect of visible light on Drosophila lifespan in both sexes. The toxic effect of ultraviolet (UV) light on organisms is well known. However, the effects of illumination with visible light remain unclear. Here, we found that visible light could be toxic to Drosophila survival, depending on the protein content in diet. In addition, further analysis revealed significant interaction between light and sex, and showed that strong light shortened life span by causing opposite direction changes in mortality rate parameters in females versus males. Our findings suggest that photoageing may be a general phenomenon, and support the theory of sexual antagonistic pleiotropy in aging intervention. The results caution that exposure to visible light could be hazardous to life span and suggest that identification of the underlying mechanism would allow better understanding of aging intervention.
Address College of Life Information Science & Instrument Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1079-5006 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29506144 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1903
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Author Alaasam, V.J.; Duncan, R.; Casagrande, S.; Davies, S.; Sidher, A.; Seymoure, B.; Shen, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Ouyang, J.Q.
Title Light at night disrupts nocturnal rest and elevates glucocorticoids at cool color temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 465-472
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Nighttime light pollution is quickly becoming a pervasive, global concern. Since the invention and proliferation of light-emitting diodes (LED), it has become common for consumers to select from a range of color temperatures of light with varying spectra. Yet, the biological impacts of these different spectra on organisms remain unclear. We tested if nighttime illumination of LEDs, at two commercially available color temperatures (3000 and 5000 K) and at ecologically relevant illumination levels affected body condition, food intake, locomotor activity, and glucocorticoid levels in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We found that individuals exposed to 5000 K light had higher rates of nighttime activity (peaking after 1 week of treatment) compared to 3000 K light and controls (no nighttime light). Birds in the 5000 K treatment group also had increased corticosterone levels from pretreatment levels compared to 3000 K and control groups but no changes in body condition or food intake. Individuals that were active during the night did not consequently decrease daytime activity. This study adds to the growing evidence that the spectrum of artificial light at night is important, and we advocate the use of nighttime lighting with warmer color temperatures of 3000 K instead of 5000 K to decrease energetic costs for avian taxa.
Address Department of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29766666 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1909
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Author Wang, L.; Liu, X.; Liu, Z.; Wang, X.; Lei, C.; Zhu, F.
Title Members of the neuropeptide transcriptional network in Helicoverpa armigera and their expression in response to light stress Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Gene Abbreviated Journal Gene
Volume 671 Issue Pages 67-77
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Neuropeptides and peptide hormones play central roles in the regulation of various types of insect physiology and behavior. Artificial light at night, a form of environmental stress, has recently been regarded as a source of light stress on nocturnal insects. Because related genomic information is not available, molecular biological studies on the response of neuropeptides in nocturnal insects to light stress are limited. Based on the de novo sequencing of the Helicoverpa armigera head transcriptome, we obtained 124,960 unigenes. Of these, the number of unigenes annotated as neuropeptides and peptide hormones, neurotransmitter precursor processing enzymes, and neurotransmitter receptors were 34, 17, and 58, respectively. Under light stress, there were sex-specific differences in gene expression measured by qRT-PCR. The IMFamide, leucokinin and sNPF genes were differentially expressed at the mRNA level in males but not in females in response to light stress. The results provide new insights on the diversity of the neuropeptide transcriptional network of H. armigera. In addition, some neuropeptides exhibited sex-specific differential expression in response to light stress. Taken collectively, these results not only expand the catalog of known insect neuropeptides but also provide a framework for future functional studies on the physiological roles they play in the light stress response behavior of nocturnal moths.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0378-1119 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1910
Permanent link to this record