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Author Manriquez, P.H.; Jara, M.E.; Diaz, M.I.; Quijon, P.A.; Widdicombe, S.; Pulgar, J.; Manriquez, K.; Quintanilla-Ahumada, D.; Duarte, C.
Title Artificial light pollution influences behavioral and physiological traits in a keystone predator species, Concholepas concholepas Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 661 Issue Pages 543-552
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is an increasing global problem that, despite being widely recognized in terrestrial systems, has been studied much less in marine habitats. In this study we investigated the effect of ALAN on behavioral and physiological traits of Concholepas concholepas, an important keystone species of the south-eastern Pacific coast. We used juveniles collected in intertidal habitats that had not previously been exposed to ALAN. In the laboratory we exposed them to two treatments: darkness and white LED (Lighting Emitting Diodes) to test for the impacts of ALAN on prey-searching behavior, self-righting time and metabolism. In the field, the distribution of juveniles was observed during daylight-hours to determine whether C. concholepas preferred shaded or illuminated microhabitats. Moreover, we compared the abundance of juveniles collected during day- and night-time hours. The laboratory experiments demonstrated that juveniles of C. concholepas seek out and choose their prey more efficiently in darkened areas. White LED illuminated conditions increased righting times and metabolism. Field surveys indicated that, during daylight hours, juveniles were more abundant in shaded micro-habitats than in illuminated ones. However, during darkness hours, individuals were not seen to aggregate in any particular microhabitats. We conclude that the exposure to ALAN might disrupt important behavioral and physiological traits of small juveniles in this species which, as a mechanism to avoid visual predators, are mainly active at night. It follows that ALAN in coastal areas might modify the entire community structure of intertidal habitats by altering the behavior of this keystone species.
Address Departamento de Ecologia y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30682607 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2213
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Author Wakefield, A.; Broyles, M.; Stone, E.L.; Harris, S.; Jones, G.; Minderman, J.
Title Quantifying the attractiveness of broad-spectrum street lights to aerial nocturnal insects Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol
Volume 55 Issue 2 Pages 714-722
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Sodium street lights, dominated by long wavelengths of light, are being replaced by broad‐spectrum, white lights globally, in particular light‐emitting diodes (LEDs). These white lights typically require less energy to operate and are therefore considered “eco‐friendly”. However, little attention has been paid to the impacts white lights may have upon local wildlife populations.

We compared insect attraction to orange (high‐pressure sodium, HPS) and white (metal halide, MH and LED) street lights experimentally using portable street lights and custom‐made flight intercept traps.

Significantly more (greater than five times as many) insects were attracted to white MH street lights than white (4,250 K) LED and HPS lights. There was no statistical difference in the numbers of insects attracted to LED and HPS lights for most taxa caught. However, rarefaction shows a greater diversity of insects caught at LED than HPS lights.

Policy implications. With the current, large‐scale conversion to white light‐emitting diode (LED) lighting, our results give insight into how changes to street light technology may affect wildlife populations and communities. We recommend avoiding metal halide light installations as they attract many more insects than competing technologies. We highlight the need to tailor LED lighting to prevent disturbances across multiple insect taxa.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2224
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Author Duarte, C.; Quintanilla-Ahumada, D.; Anguita, C.; Manríquez, P.H.; Widdicombe, S.; Pulgar, J.; Silva-Rodriguez, E.A.; Miranda, C.; Manríquez, K.; Quijón, P.A.
Title Artificial light pollution at night (ALAN) disrupts the distribution and circadian rhythm of a sandy beach isopod Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Coastal habitats, in particular sandy beaches, are becoming increasingly exposed to artificial light pollution at night (ALAN). Yet, only a few studies have this far assessed the effects of ALAN on the species inhabiting these ecosystems. In this study we assessed the effects of ALAN on Tylos spinulosus, a prominent wrack-consumer isopod living in sandy beaches of north-central Chile. This species burrows in the sand during daylight and emerges at night to migrate down-shore, so we argue it can be used as a model species for the study of ALAN effects on coastal nocturnal species. We assessed whether ALAN alters the distribution and locomotor activity of this isopod using a light system placed in upper shore sediments close to the edge of the dunes, mimicking light intensities measured near public lighting. The response of the isopods was compared to control transects located farther away and not exposed to artificial light. In parallel, we measured the isopods’ locomotor activity in the laboratory using actographs that recorded their movement within mesocosms simulating the beach surface. Measurements in the field indicated a clear reduction in isopod abundance near the source of the light and a restriction of their tidal distribution range, as compared to control transects. Meanwhile, the laboratory experiments showed that in mesocosms exposed to ALAN, isopods exhibited reduced activity and a circadian rhythm that was altered and even lost after a few days. Such changes with respect to control mesocosms with a natural day/night cycle suggest that the changes observed in the field were directly related to a disruption in the locomotor activity of the isopods. All together these results provide causal evidence of negative ALAN effects on this species, and call for further research on other nocturnal sandy beach species that might become increasingly affected by ALAN.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2228
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Author Fonken, L.K.; Bedrosian, T.A.; Zhang, N.; Weil, Z.M.; DeVries, A.C.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Dim light at night impairs recovery from global cerebral ischemia Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Experimental Neurology Abbreviated Journal Exp Neurol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Nighttime lighting is one of the great conveniences of modernization; however, there is mounting evidence that inopportune light exposure can disrupt physiological and behavioral functions. Hospital patients may be particularly vulnerable to the consequences of light at night due to their compromised physiological state. Cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA) was used to test the hypothesis in mice that exposure to dim light at night impairs central nervous system (CNS) recovery from a major pathological insult. Mice exposed to dim light at night (5lx) had higher mortality in the week following cardiac arrest compared to mice housed in dark nights (0lx). Neuronal damage was significantly greater in surviving mice exposed to dim light at night after CA versus those housed in dark nights. Dim light at night may have elevated neuronal damage by amplifying pro-inflammatory pathways in the CNS; Iba1 immunoreactivity (an indication of microglia activation) and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression were elevated in mice exposed to dim light at night post-CA. Furthermore, selective inhibition of IL-1beta or TNFalpha ameliorated damage in mice exposed to dim light at night. The effects of light at night on CA outcomes were also prevented by using a wavelength of nighttime light that has minimal impact on the endogenous circadian clock, suggesting that replacing broad-spectrum nighttime light with specific circadian-inert wavelengths could be protective. Together, these data indicate that exposure to dim light at night after global cerebral ischemia increases neuroinflammation, in turn exacerbating neurological damage and potential for mortality.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0014-4886 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30822422 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2235
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Author Farnworth, B.; Meitern, R.; Innes, J.; Waas, J.R.
Title Increasing predation risk with light reduces speed, exploration and visit duration of invasive ship rats (Rattus rattus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 3739
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Exploiting predation cues to deter pests remains an untapped management tool for conservationists. We examined foraging and movement patterns of 20 wild ship rats (Rattus rattus) within a large, outdoor 'U maze' that was either illuminated or dark to assess if light (an indirect predation cue) could deter rodents from ecologically vulnerable locations. Light did not alter rats' foraging behaviour (latency to approach seed tray, visits to seed tray, time per visit to seed tray, total foraging duration, foraging rate) within the experimental resource patch but three of seven movement behaviours were significantly impaired (53% fewer visits to the maze, 70% less exploration within the maze, 40% slower movement within the maze). The total time males spent exposed to illumination also declined by 45 minutes per night, unlike females. Individual visits tended to be longer under illumination, but the latency to visit and the latency to cross through the U maze were unaffected by illumination. Elevating predation risk with illumination may be a useful pest management technique for reducing ship rat activity, particularly in island ecosystems where controlling mammalian predators is paramount to preserving biodiversity.
Address Biological Sciences, School of Science, University of Waikato, Private Bag, 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30842448; PMCID:PMC6403350 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2250
Permanent link to this record